National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) - 280 Matching Results

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Full-scale wind-tunnel tests of a propeller with the diameter changed by cutting off the blade tips

Description: Tests were conducted in order to determine how the characteristics of a propeller are affected by cutting off the tips. The diameter of a standard 10-foot metal propeller was changed successively to 9 feet 6 inches, 9 feet 0 inches, 8 feet 6 inches, and 8 feet 0 inches. Each propeller thus formed was tested at four pitch settings using an open cockpit fuselage and a D-12 engine. A small loss in propulsive efficiency is indicated. Examples are given showing the application of the results to practical problems.
Date: December 10, 1929
Creator: Wood, Donald H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tests of large airfoils in the propeller research tunnel, including two with corrugated surfaces

Description: This report gives the results of the tests of seven 2 by 12 foot airfoils (Clark Y, smooth and corrugated, Gottingen 398, N.A.C.A. M-6, and N.A.C.A. 84). The tests were made in the propeller research tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at Reynolds numbers up to 2,000,000. The Clark Y airfoil was tested with three degrees of surface smoothness. Corrugating the surface causes a flattening of the lift curve at the burble point and an increase in drag at small flying angles.
Date: May 24, 1929
Creator: Wood, Donald H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Full-scale wind-tunnel tests of a series of metal propellers on a VE-7 airplane

Description: An adjustable blade metal propeller was tested at five different angle settings, forming a series varying in pitch. The propeller was mounted on a VE-7 airplane in the twenty-foot propeller research tunnel of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The efficiencies were found to be from 4 to 7 per cent higher than those of standard wood propellers operating under the same conditions. The results are given in convenient form for use in selecting propellers for aircraft.
Date: January 1, 1929
Creator: Weick, Fred E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interaction between air propellers and airplane structures

Description: The purpose of this investigation was the determination of the character and amount of interaction between air propellers as usually mounted on airplanes and the adjacent parts of the airplane structure - or, more specifically, those parts of the airplane structure within the wash of the propeller, and capable of producing any significant effect on propeller performance. In report no. 177 such interaction between air propellers and certain simple geometrical forms was made the subject of investigation and report. The present investigation aims to carry this general study one stage further by substituting actual airplane structures for the simple geometrical forms. From the point of view of the present investigation, the airplane structures, viewed as an obstruction in the wake of the propeller, must also be viewed as a necessary part of the airplane and not as an appendage which might be installed or removed at will. (author).
Date: January 1, 1927
Creator: Durand, W F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interference tests on NACA pitot tubes

Description: In connection with the standardization of instruments used in the wind tunnel, this investigation was undertaken to determine the nature and magnitude of the errors inherent in the measurement of air speed by a pitot tube when the instrument is mounted close to some other body. The mounting of the instrument in proximity to some other body is so frequent in flight and in wind tunnel research that it seemed advisable to investigate thoroughly the magnitude of the possible errors caused by such proximity. The results of this investigation will facilitate comparisons of the errors due to interference which have been reduced to percentages of the air-speed readings obtained under conditions of no interference.
Date: January 1, 1925
Creator: Reid, Elliott G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The influence of the form of a wooden beam on its stiffness and strength I : deflection of beams with special reference to shear deformations

Description: The purpose of this investigation was to determine to what extent ordinary deflection formulas, which neglect shear deformations, are in error when applied to beams of various sections, and to develop reasonably accurate yet comparatively simple formulas which take into account such deformations. A great many tests were made to determine the amount of shear deformation for beams of various sections tested over many different spans. As the span over which the beam is tested is increased the error introduced by neglecting shear deformations becomes less, and the values obtained by substituting measured deflections in the ordinary formulas approach more nearly the modulus of elasticity in tension and compression. For short spans the error is considerable and increases rapidly as the span is reduced. Two formulas were developed for estimating the magnitude of shear deformations, both of which have been verified by tests. The first assumes the parabolic distribution of shear on a cross section of a beam and, starting with a differential volume, the distortion due to shear is determined by the ordinary methods of summarizing the work. The second assumes that the deflections due to shear in any two beams of the same length, height, and moment of inertia, which are similarly loaded, are proportional to the summations of the shear stresses on their respective vertical sections. Both formulas check experimental results very closely when the calculations are made with great refinement.
Date: January 1, 1924
Creator: Newlin, J A & Trayer, G W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The influence of the form of a wooden beam on its stiffness and strength III : stresses in wood members subjected to combined column and beam action

Description: The general purpose in this study was to determine the stresses in a wooden member subjected to combined beam and column action. What may be considered the specific purpose, as it relates more directly to the problem of design, was to determine the particular stress that obtains at maximum load which, for combined loading, does not occur simultaneously with maximum stress.
Date: January 1, 1925
Creator: Newlin, J A & Trayer, G W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The influence of the form of a wooden beam on its stiffness and strength II : form factors of beams subjected to transverse loading only

Description: The general aim of the investigation described in this report is the achievement of efficient design in wing beams. The purpose of the tests was to determine factors to apply to the usual beam formula in order that the properties of wood based on tests of rectangular sections might be used as a basis of design for beams of any sections and if practical to develop formulas for determining such factors and to verify them by experiment. Such factors for various sections have been determined from test by comparing properties of the beam in question to similar properties of matched beams 2 by 2 inches in section. Furthermore, formulas were worked out, more or less empirical in character, which check all of these test values remarkably well.
Date: January 1, 1924
Creator: Newlin, J A & Trayer, G W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An investigation of the aerodynamic characteristics of an airplane equipped with several different sets of wings

Description: This investigation was conducted by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at Langley Field, Va., at the request of the Army Air Corps, for the purpose of comparing the full scale lift and drag characteristics of an airplane equipped with several sets of wings of commonly used airfoil sections. A Sperry Messenger Airplane with wings of R.A.F.-15, U.S.A.-5, U.S.A.-27, and Gottingen 387 airfoil sections was flown and the lift and drag characteristics of the airplane with each set of wings were determined by means of glide tests. The results are presented in tabular and curve form. (author).
Date: January 1, 1929
Creator: Crowley, J W , Jr & Green, M W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An investigation of the use of discharge valves and an intake control for improving the performance of N.A.C.A. Roots type supercharger

Description: This report presents the results of an analytical investigation on the practicability of using mechanically operated discharge valves in conjunction with a manually operated intake control for improving the performance of N. A. C. A. Roots type superchargers. These valves, which may be either of the oscillating or rotating type, are placed in the discharge opening of the supercharger and are so shaped and synchronized with the supercharger impellers that they do not open until the air has been compressed to the delivery pressure. The intake control limits the quantity of air compressed to engine requirements by permitting the excess air to escape from the compression chamber before compression begins. The percentage power saving and the actual horsepower saved were computed for altitudes from 0 to 20,000 feet. These computations are based on the pressure-volume cards for the conventional and the modified roots type superchargers and on the results of laboratory tests of the conventional type. The use of discharge valves shows a power saving of approximately 26 per cent at a critical altitude of 20,000 feet. In addition, these valves reduce the amplitude of the discharge pulsations and increase the volumetric efficiency. With slow-speed roots blowers operating at high-pressure differences even better results would be expected. For aircraft engine superchargers operating at high speeds these discharge valves increase the performance as above, but have the disadvantages of increasing the weight and of adding a high-speed mechanism to a simple machine. (author).
Date: January 1, 1929
Creator: Schey, Oscar W & Wilson, Ernest E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of turbulence in wind tunnels by a study of the flow about cylinders

Description: With the assistance and cooperation of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics the Bureau of Standards has been engaged for the past year in an investigation of turbulence in wind tunnels, especially in so far as turbulence affects the results of measurements in different wind tunnels. Two methods of making such studies are described in this report together with the results of the use in the 54-inch wind tunnel of the Bureau of Standards. The first method consists in measuring the drag of circular cylinders; the second in measuring the static pressure at some fixed point. Both methods show that the flow is not entirely free from irregularities.
Date: January 1, 1926
Creator: Dryden, H L & Heald, R H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of slipstream velocity

Description: These experiments were made at the request of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department, to investigate the velocity of the air in the slipstream in horizontal and climbing flight to determine the form of expression giving the slipstream velocity in terms of the airspeed of the airplane. The method used consisted in flying the airplane both on a level course and in climb at full throttle and measuring the slipstream velocity at seven points in the slipstream for the whole speed range of the airplane in both conditions. In general the results show that for both condition, horizontal and climbing flights, the slipstream velocity v subscript 3 and airspeed v can be represented by straight lines and consequently the equations are of the form: v subscript s = mv+b where m and b are constant. (author).
Date: January 1925
Creator: Crowley, J. W., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance of Maybach 300-horsepower airplane engine

Description: This report contains the results of a test made upon a Maybach Engine in the altitude chamber of the Bureau of Standards, where controlled conditions of temperature and pressure can be made the same as those of the desired altitude. The results of this test lead to the following conclusions: from the standpoint of thermal efficiency the full-load performance of the engine is excellent at densities corresponding to altitudes up to and including 15,000 feet. The brake mean effective pressure is rather low even at wide-open throttle. This tends to give a high weight per horsepower, in as much as the weight of many engine parts is governed by the size rather than the power of the engine. At part load the thermal efficiency of the engine is low. Judged on a basis of performance the engine's chief claim to interest would appear to lie in the carburetor design, which is largely responsible excellent full-load efficiency and for its poor part-load efficiency.
Date: January 1, 1923
Creator: Sparrow, S W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance of B. M. W. 185-Horsepower Airplane Engine

Description: This report deals with the results of a test made upon a B. M. W. Engine in the altitude chamber of the Bureau of Standards, where controlled conditions of temperature and pressure can be made to simulate those of the desired altitude. A remarkably low value of fuel consumption - 041 per B. H. P. hour - is obtained at 1,200 revolutions per minute at an air density of 0.064 pound per cubic foot and a brake thermal efficiency of 33 per cent and an indicated efficiency of 37 per cent at the above speed and density. In spite of the fact that the carburetor adjustment does not permit the air-fuel ratio of maximum economy to be obtained at air densities lower than 0.064, the economy is superior to most engines tested thus far, even at a density lower than 0.064, the economies superior to most engines tested thus far, even at a density (0.03) corresponding to an altitude of 25,000 feet. The brake mean effective pressure even at full throttle is rather low. Since the weight of much of the engine is governed more by its piston displacement than by the power developed, a decreased mean effective pressure usually necessitates increased weight per horsepower. The altitude performance of the engine is, in general, excellent, and its low fuel consumption is the outstanding feature of merit.
Date: January 1, 1923
Creator: Sparrow, S W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nomenclature for aeronautics

Description: Report defines the principal terms which have come into use in the development of aeronautics. It was prepared in cooperation with a committee engaged upon a similar undertaking in Great Britain. As a result this nomenclature is in substantial agreement with the one which has been adopted by the aeronautical authorities of Great Britain.
Date: 1920
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nomenclature for Aeronautics

Description: This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature by the Executive Committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held August 11, 1933. This publication supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications.
Date: January 1, 1924
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonmetallic diaphragms for instruments

Description: This report, the second of a series of reports relating to the general subject of instrument diaphragms. The first report of the series was published as Technical Report no. 165, "diaphragms for aeronautic instruments," and comprised an outline of historical developments and theoretical principles. The present report relates entirely to nonmetallic diaphragms, the use of which in certain types of pressure elements has been increasing for some time. Little, if any, information has been available to aid the designer of instruments using this form of pressure element. It was to attempt to meet the need for such information that the investigation reported in this paper was undertaken. The report describes the various materials which have been used as nonmetallic diaphragms, discusses the factors which affect the performance of the diaphragms and gives the results of tests made for the purpose of investigating the effect produced by these factors.
Date: January 1, 1925
Creator: Eaton, H N & Buckingham, C T
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nomenclature for aeronautics

Description: This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a special conference on aeronautical nomenclature, composed of representatives of the Army and Navy Air Services, the Air Mail Service, the Bureau of Standards, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, and private life. This report supersedes all previous publications of the committee on this subject. It is published with the intention of securing greater uniformity and accuracy in official documents of the government, and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications. (author).
Date: January 1, 1923
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nomenclature for aeronautics

Description: The purpose of the Committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications. This report supersedes all previous publications of the Committee on this subject.
Date: January 1, 1921
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nomenclature for aeronautics

Description: This nomenclature for aeronautics was prepared by a Special Conference on Aeronautical Nomenclature by the executive committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at a meeting held on August 19, 1924, at which meeting Dr. Joseph S. Ames was appointed chairman of the conference. The conference was composed of representatives of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and specially appointed representatives officially designated by the Army Air Service, the Bureau of Aeronautics of the Navy Department, the Bureau of Standards, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and the Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce. The purpose of the committee in the preparation and publication of this report is to secure uniformity in the official documents of the government and, as far as possible, in technical and other commercial publications.
Date: January 1, 1927
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary report on free flight tests

Description: Results are presented for a series of tests made by the Advisory Committee's staff at Langley Field during the summer of 1919 with the objectives of determining the characteristics of airplanes in flight and the extent to which the actual characteristics differ from those predicted from tests on models in the wind tunnel, and of studying the balance of the machines and the forces which must be applied to the controls in order to maintain longitudinal equilibrium.
Date: 1920
Creator: Warner, E. P. & Norton, F. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A preliminary study of fuel injection and compression ignition as applied to an aircraft engine cylinder

Description: This report summarizes some results obtained with a single cylinder test engine at the Langley Field Laboratory during a preliminary investigation of the problem of applying fuel injection and compression ignition to aircraft engines. For this work a standard Liberty Engine cylinder was fitted with a high compression, 11.4 : 1 compression ratio, piston, and equipped with an airless injection system, including a primary fuel pump, an injection pump, and an automatic injection valve. The results obtained during this investigation have indicated the possibility of applying airless injection and compression ignition to a cylinder of this size, 8-inch bore by 7-inch stroke, when operating at engine speeds as high as 1,850 R. P. M. A minimum specific fuel consumption with diesel engine fuel oil of 0.30 pound per I. HP. Hour was obtained when developing about 16 B. HP. At 1,730 R. P. M.
Date: January 1, 1927
Creator: Gardiner, Arthur W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department