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Methods of Poultry Management at the Maine Agricultural Experiment Station

Description: This bulletin discusses the methods of poultry management employed at the U. S. Department of Agriculture's Maine Agricultural Experiment Station. It contains recommendations for breeding, natural and artificial incubation, feeding practices, and sheltering.
Date: 1909
Creator: Pearl, Raymond, 1879-1940
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Standard Varieties of Chickens: III. The Asiatic, English, and French Classes

Description: "The breeds of chickens included in the Asiatic, English, and French classes are in the main of a relatively large size, and have been developed primarily as meat breeds. They are not so commonly kept in this country [the United States] as either the general-purpose or the egg breeds. The best-known meat breeds in the United States are those of the Asiatic class. However, the breeds of the English and French classes, while averaging somewhat smaller in size than those of the Asiatic class, were developed for their table qualities and therefore are popularly grouped among the meat breeds. In the opinion of many persons the Sussex and Orpington breeds, both English, are general-purpose breeds. The Orpington, in particular, is a fairly common and popular farm fowl in the United States. The best-known section of the United States in which large table fowls of superior quality are produced in considerable quantities is the South Shore distrct of Massachusetts, near Boston. The chicks are hatched in the fall or early winter, and both males and females are grown to a good size and marketed as South Shore roasters. The males usually are caponized, but are marketed as roasters rather than capons, and the pullets are marketed before they begin to lay." -- p. 2. These and other breeds of the Asiatic, English, and French classes of chickens are discussed.
Date: 1919
Creator: Slocum, Rob R. (Rob Roy), 1883-1944
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Standard Varieties of Chickens: III. The Asiatic, English, and French Classes

Description: Revised edition. "The breeds of chickens included in the Asiatic, English, and French classes are in the main of a relatively large size, and have been developed primarily as meat breeds. They are not so commonly kept in this country [the United States] as either the general-purpose or the egg breeds. The best-known meat breeds in the United States are those of the Asiatic class. However, the breeds of the English and French classes, while averaging somewhat smaller in size than those of the Asiatic class, were developed for their table qualities and therefore are popularly grouped among the meat breeds. In the opinion of many persons the Sussex and Orpington breeds, both English, are general-purpose breeds. The Orpington, in particular, is a fairly common and popular farm fowl in the United States. The best-known section of the United States in which large table fowls of superior quality are produced in considerable quantities is the South Shore distrct of Massachusetts, near Boston. The chicks are hatched in the fall or early winter, and both males and females are grown to a good size and marketed as South Shore roasters. The males usually are caponized, but are marketed as roasters rather than capons, and the pullets are marketed before they begin to lay." -- p. 2. These and other breeds of the Asiatic, English, and French classes of chickens are discussed.
Date: 1921
Creator: Slocum, Rob R. (Rob Roy), 1883-1944
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Date: 1919
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Date: 1920
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Date: 1926
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Muscadine Grapes

Description: "Muscadine grapes are indigenous to the southeastern section of the United States, where they grow in greater or less profusion in the wild state. Through careful selection from the wild grapes and scientific breeding there have been developed a considerable number of varieties particularly adapted to the home needs in the Southeast, both as table grapes and as raw material for a variety of food and beverage products. Not being resistant to low winter temperatures they do not thrive in the northern grape districts. Muscadines are relatively resistant to grape diseases and insect pests and do well with a minimum of care, but, like most fruits, respond favorably to good cultural treatment. This bulletin sets forth in nontechnical form the information accumulated by the Department [of Agriculture] over a considerable period of years on muscadine grape varieties, their bleeding, culture, and uses." -- p. ii
Date: 1938
Creator: Dearing, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Wildlife Conservation Through Erosion Control in the Piedmont

Description: "Erosion has left scars on a majority of farms in the Southeast. Too poor to produce crops, the eroding spots are usually abandoned. Unless they are treated to stop further washing of the soil they grow steadily larger and continually rob the farmer of more of his land. Fortunately, soil conservation and wildlife management can be effectively combined, and otherwise worthless areas made to produce a crop of game, fur bearers, and other desirable types of wildlife. The general principles of wildlife management on the farm are described in Farmers' Bulletins 1719 and 1759. The purpose of this bulletin is to show how gullies, terrace outlets, waterways, eroding field borders, pastures, and woodlands in the Piedmont region may be protected against erosion through the use of vegetation that will also provide food and cover for wildlife." -- p. ii
Date: 1937
Creator: Stevens, Ross O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Terracing for Soil and Water Conservation

Description: This bulletin describes terracing methods that are able to combat soil erosion and conserve water. There are three types of terraces (drainage, absorptive, and bench) and plans, specifications, construction practices are provided in the bulletin.
Date: 1938
Creator: Hamilton, C. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Implements and Methods of Tillage to Control Soil Blowing on the Northern Great Plains

Description: This bulletin tools and methods of tilling which can help reduce or control soil blowing and soil erosion on farms in the northern Great Plains of the United States. Among the crops discussed with relation to tilling methods are beans, corn, sorghum, potatoes, alfalfa, and sweet clover.
Date: 1938
Creator: Cole, John S. (John Selden) & Morgan, George W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Making Lime on the Farm

Description: "The farmer can buy lime from commercial sources in the form and degree of purity desired; he can produce his own if he has a convenient supply of raw material; or he can cooperate with his neighbors in working a deposit. This bulletin deals with factors which should be considered by a farmer or a group of farmers before investing in equipment for obtaining lime from limestone or marl." -- p. 1
Date: 1938
Creator: Kessler, N. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Culture and Pests of Field Peas

Description: This bulletin discusses the culture of the field and diseases and insects which commonly afflict it. Diseases discussed include leaf spot, stem blight, bacterial blight, left blotch, powdery mildew, downy mildew, anthracnose, fusarium wilt, root rot, and mosaic. The pea weevil, aphid, and moth are the insects discussed, as well as the nematode.
Date: 1938
Creator: McKee, Roland & Schoth, H. A. (Harry August), b. 1891
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Bacterial Wilt of Corn

Description: This bulletin discusses bacterial wilt, which is a destructive disease of corn and is particularly destructive to sweet corn. It describes the causes and symptoms of the disease, methods of transmission, the effect of weather, and control measures.
Date: 1941
Creator: Elliott, Charlotte
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Ponds for Wildlife

Description: "The first purpose of this bulletin is to show how farmers and ranchers may protect their ponds from sedimentation, soil erosion, and water loss through the use of vegetation suitable as food and shelter for wildlife; the second is to give some information on the management of wildlife in farm ponds. Unless otherwise stated, the information contained in this bulletin pertains to the water area, or pond proper, and the pond area, or the land immediately adjacent to the pond and ordinarily contained within a fence." -- p. ii
Date: 1941
Creator: Allan, Philip Farley, 1909- & Davis, Cecil N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Pea Aphid on Peas and Methods for Its Control

Description: "The pea aphid is present wherever peas are grown in the United States and is one of the most serious insect enemies of this important food crop. It has many generations a year, and under favorable conditions large and destructive populations of the pest may develop in a relatively short time. Natural enemies cannot be depended on for effective control, and therefore insecticides must be applied when threatening infestations of the aphid develop. Several insecticides and methods for their use are discussed in this bulletin. The choice of these will depend on local conditions, including the type of machinery and insecticide available, but any of them will be effective if applied as directed." -- p. i
Date: 1943
Creator: Dudley, J. E. & Bronson, T. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Muscadine Grapes: A Fruit for the South

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cultivation of muscadine grapes in the southern United States. Topics discussed include propagation, pruning and training, soil management, fertilizers, harvesting, common diseases, and varieties.
Date: 1965
Creator: United States. Agricultural Research Service. Crops Research Division.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Catfish Farming

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the farming of channel catfish, which is the most commonly grown species of catfish. Catfish can be grown successfully in ponds, cages, or raceways. Topics discussed include water quality, spawning, feeding, harvesting, diseases, and production costs.
Date: 1981
Creator: United States. Soil Conservation Service.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Date: 1930
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Date: 1932
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed and instructions for constructing a concrete vat are given.
Date: 1940
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Hessian Fly and How to Prevent Losses from It

Description: "The Hessian fly undoubtedly is the most injurious insect enemy of wheat in the United States. During the last 37 years at least seven general outbreaks of this pest have occurred in the States east of the Mississippi River. These invasions have averaged about one every five years, although they have occurred at rather irregular intervals. The last one was very destructive and was at its height during the period from 1914 to 1916.... A large proportion of such losses is preventable, although no remedy is known which will destroy the pest or save the crop once it has become thoroughly infested. Control and preventive measures are described on page 13 and summarized on page 16." -- p. 2
Date: 1920
Creator: Walton, William Randolph, 1873-1952
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Grading Wool

Description: Revised edition. "Most wool growers need to know more about wool grading, whether they expect to grade wool or not. This bulletin contains information about the subject so growers interested may improve their position when they are ready to sell their wool. It also suggests ways to handle the wool so that its quality will be maintained through the shearing and the preparation of the fleece." -- p. ii
Date: 1939
Creator: Christie, James W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Soil Defense in the South

Description: "This bulletin describes farming practices that conserve soil, and how such practices may be applied to farms in a large part of the South. Its scope is limited to that part of the Cotton Belt extending west from the Georgia-Alabama line to central Texas and southern Oklahoma." -- p. i.
Date: 1938
Creator: Rowalt, E. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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