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Master Zophei word list

Description: This is the master word list from the dissertation "The Sound Systems of Zophei Dialects and Other Maraic Languages" which includes the form in both varieties (Tlawngrang and Lawngtlang), tone analysis, English gloss, and part of speech.
Date: September 17, 2021
Creator: Lotven, Samson
Partner: UNT College of Information
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The Sound Systems of Zophei Dialects and Other Maraic Languages

Description: This dissertation presents in-depth description and analysis the Zophei sound system within the context of the closely-related Maraic languages. Zophei (or Zyphe, ISO 639-3 ZYP), a previously undocumented member of the Maraic branch of Kuki-Chin (or South-Central Tibeto-Burman) spoken in Southern Thantlang Township, Chin State, Burma/Myanmar and by thousands of speakers in Indianapolis, Indiana. Using primary data elicited during three years of fieldwork, the sound systems of Lawngtlang, Tlawngrang, and Nuitah Zophei are investigated in detail. Special attention is paid to the segmental, syllable structure, and tonal inventories. A long history of language contact in the Maraic-speaking world has brought on radical innovations in syllable structure, vowel systems, and tone that have, as of yet, seen little linguistic analysis. Outside of the present research program, no previous linguistic work on Zophei exists. As such, this thesis endeavors to describe and analyze the sound systems of Zophei varieties.
Date: December 2021
Creator: Lotven, Samson
Partner: UNT College of Information
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Field notes from elicitations

Description: Field notes from elicitations of common nouns (body parts, family members, colors, natural objects) and sentence structure. Sentence examples demonstrate negation, interrogatives, conditionals, and pronouns in Raji.
Date: 1998/2004
Creator: Rastogi, Kavita
Partner: UNT College of Information
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KokBorok dictionary drafts and notes

Description: Notes from the 1978-88 Linguistic Field Methods course at University of California, Berkeley on KokBorok with the consultant Prashanta Tripura. These are typed drafts of a KokBorok dictionary with notes and questions from the authors to each other. The drafts are organized by initial and rhyme. For some entries, the form is also provided in Bengali (Bng.), Bodo (B.), or the Naitong variety of KokBorok (Ntg.). See table of contents for detailed listing.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Matisoff, James A.; Tripura, Prashanta & Jurafsky, Dan
Partner: UNT College of Information
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KokBorok grammar drafts and notes

Description: Notes from the 1987-88 Linguistic Field Methods course at University of California, Berkeley on KokBorok with the consultant Prashanta Tripura. These are the handwritten and typed drafts of the KokBorok grammar with notes and questions from the authors to each other. See table of contents for detailed listing.
Date: 1988
Creator: Matisoff, James A.; Tripura, Prashanta & Jurafsky, Dan
Partner: UNT College of Information
open access

Notes on KokBorok grammar

Description: Handwritten notes from the 1978-88 Linguistic Field Methods course at University of California, Berkeley on KokBorok with the consultant Prashanta Tripura. Grammatical notes cover reduplication, compound nouns, verbal particles, and serial verbs. Some notes are in Bengali and other languages. Sociolinguistic and historical notes describe sound changes, regional variation, and the relationships between KokBorok and other Bodo-Garo languages. See table of contents for detailed listing.
Date: 1987/1988
Creator: Tripura, Prashanta; Jurafsky, Dan & Matisoff, James A.
Partner: UNT College of Information
open access

Notes on KokBorok grammar

Description: Handwritten notes from the 1978-88 Linguistic Field Methods course at University of California, Berkeley on KokBorok with the consultant Prashanta Tripura. There are word lists of verbs and common nouns and notes from elicitations of grammatical categories including TAM, gender, classifiers, particles, negation, subordinators, and adverbials. See table of contents for detailed listing.
Date: 1987/1988
Creator: Matisoff, James A.
Partner: UNT College of Information
open access

Some Preliminary Issues in the Reconstruction of Proto-KokBorok

Description: This is a description of Proto-KokBorok prepared as part of the 1987-88 Linguistic Field Methods course at University of California, Berkeley on KokBorok with some handwritten notes from Jim Matisoff. Tripura describes regional variation and provides a phoneme inventory, rhyme classes, and correspondences with Bodo.
Date: May 27, 1988
Creator: Tripura, Prashanta
Partner: UNT College of Information

ARPAN meeting of Raji and Bhotia women

Description: Photograph of a cluster meeting that was organized by a local NGO 'ARPAN'. At this lunch meeting, Rastogi met many Raji women to cross-check spellings of various Raji words. Bhotia tribal women were also invited. Though educationally, economically, and socially, Bhotia are better off, Rajis consider themselves King of the forest, so many elderly Raji ladies did not have food as the Bhotia ladies were cooking food.
Date: 2008
Creator: Rastogi, Kavita
Partner: UNT College of Information

ARPAN meeting of Raji and Bhotia women

Description: Photograph of a cluster meeting that was organized by a local NGO 'ARPAN'. At this lunch meeting, Rastogi met many Raji women to cross-check spellings of various Raji words. Bhotia tribal women were also invited. Though educationally, economically, and socially, Bhotia are better off, Rajis consider themselves King of the forest, so many elderly Raji ladies did not have food as the Bhotia ladies were cooking food.
Date: 2008
Creator: Rastogi, Kavita
Partner: UNT College of Information

ARPAN meeting of Raji and Bhotia women

Description: Photograph of a cluster meeting that was organized by a local NGO 'ARPAN'. At this lunch meeting, Rastogi met many Raji women to cross-check spellings of various Raji words. Bhotia tribal women were also invited. Though educationally, economically, and socially, Bhotia are better off, Rajis consider themselves King of the forest, so many elderly Raji ladies did not have food as the Bhotia ladies were cooking food.
Date: 2008
Creator: Rastogi, Kavita
Partner: UNT College of Information
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