Search Results

Book Review: What is it Like to be Dead? Near-Death Experiences, Christianity, and the Occult

Description: Review of a book titled "What is it Like to be Dead? Near-Death Experiences, Christianity, and the Occult" written by Jens Schlieter, which discusses near-death experiences in Western Christian and occult traditions between 1580 and 1975. The review discusses Schlieter's methodology and conclusions.
Date: Summer 2020
Creator: Shushan, Gregory
Partner: UNT Libraries

Coping with Cancer: Case Studies on the Effects of Learning About Near-Death Experiences

Description: Abstract: People diagnosed with cancer frequently report deleterious psychological experiences because of their diagnosis and subsequent medical treatment. One particularly helpful coping strategy reported by cancer patients is psychoeducational on spiritual topics. Anecdotally, cancer survivors reported that psychoeducation about near-death experiences (NDEs) has been a source of great comfort. In this article, we present two case studies on cancer survivors who reported that learning about NDEs helped them cope with cancer successfully by enabling them to face with greater peace both ongoing medical treatment and a potential for death.
Date: Summer 2020
Creator: Foster, Ryan D.; Maxwell, Lauren & Butler, William E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Subjective Sleep Quality After a Near-Death Experience

Description: Abstract: Findings from several studies suggest near-death experiences (NDEs) may influence sleep quality. In this study, we examined self-reported duration, latency, and quality of sleep in those who had experienced a life-threatening event and who had and had not reported an associated NDE. Participants were 154 members of the general New Zealand population who completed an online quantitative questionnaire that included the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Near-Death Experience Scale, Impact of Event Scale-Revised, and Life Changes Inventory-Revised. Both the NDE and non-NDE groups indicated sleep habits had changed after their close encounter with death. Participants slept less, took longer to fall asleep, and experienced more sleep disturbances. However, we found no differences between the groups, suggesting sleep alterations occurred in response to the near-death event rather than specifically to the NDE.
Date: Summer 2020
Creator: Lindsay, Nicole & Tassell-Matamua, Natasha
Partner: UNT Libraries

Editor's Foreword

Description: Editorial statement introducing the contents of the journal issue and providing other relevant notes. This issue's articles focus on gaining deeper understandings of currently accepted research about near-death experiences.
Date: Summer 2020
Creator: Holden, Janice Miner
Partner: UNT Libraries

Book Review: Moral development & reality: Beyond the theories of Kholberg, Hoffman, and Haidt (4th ed.)

Description: Review of a book titled "Moral development & reality: Beyond the theories of Kohlberg, Hoffman and Haidt," written by John C. Gibbs, a professor of developmental psychology. This book explores theories of promoting prosocial behavior and morals in at-risk and delinquent youth, and addresses the theories of Jonathan Haidt, Lawrence Kohlberg, and Martin Hoffman regarding moral development.
Date: Spring 2020
Creator: Wade, Jenny
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Mystical Experience and Its Neural Correlates

Description: Abstract: Despite their different etiologies, three types of spiritually transformative experiences (STEs)--near-death experiences, psilocybin experiences, and meditative experiences of cosmic consciousness--appear to have attributes that are common to a broad range of mystical experiences, including an experience of expanded awareness. In addition, all three appear to be associated with profound and lasting transformations in the lives of experiencers. Finally, these three experiences appear to share some common neural correlates. In this article, we discuss similarities in case studies of these STEs, in data from controlled clinical research studies on their transformative effects, as well as from neurophysiological data correlated with the occurrence of STEs themselves. In all three STEs, research shows a reduction in neural activity in the major centers of the brain, including the Default Mode Network, the foundation of egoic stories involving the narrative related to oneself and the world in which one lives. It is proposed that during these STEs, reduced neural activity in areas of the brain that normally act as a filter or reducing valve mechanism opens the capacity to expanded awareness, which is associated with lasting transformation in the lives of experiencers.
Date: Spring 2020
Creator: Woollacott, Marjorie & Shumway-Cook, Anne
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Significance of Autoscopies as a Time Marker for the Occurrence of Near-Death Experiences

Description: Abstract: The physiological and psychological underpinnings of near-death experiences (NDEs) are not yet understood. In this article, we show that for "critical" NDEs reported after cardiac arrest, two different neurophysiological models have been proposed that, in the literature so far, have not been adequately distinguished from each other. In the real-time model, it is postulated that during critical NDEs, residual activities in the cerebrum were sufficient to generate NDEs in real time. In the reconstruction model, it is assumed that due to severe oxygen deficiency, critical NDEs could not have occurred at the time in question but were reconstructed later during the regeneration phase of the brain. To assess the plausibility of these two models, we analyzed the phenomenology of the view of one's own body from above (autoscopy) that frequently occurs in the beginnings of NDEs. In addition to the available literature, we used original descriptions of autoscopies obtained in an online survey conducted in 2015. We found that the reconstruction model is not supported by empirical findings and that some findings even speak against it. We therefore conclude that future discussions of explanatory models of NDEs should focus primarily on the neurophysiological real-time model and a third alternative according to which autoscopies and NDEs occur in relative independence from the prevailing neurophysiological processes in the brain.
Date: Spring 2020
Creator: Nahm, Michael & Weibel, Adrian
Partner: UNT Libraries

Editor's Foreword

Description: Editorial statement introducing the contents of the journal issue and providing other relevant notes. This issue includes articles that examine empirical data related to near-death experiences.
Date: Spring 2020
Creator: Holden, Janice Miner
Partner: UNT Libraries

Book Review: Near-Death Experience in Indigenous Religions

Description: Review of a book titled "Near-Death Experience in Indigenous Religions" written by Gregory Shushan, which is a study of near-death experiences in the indigenous societies of North America, Africa, and Oceania. The review points out the weaknesses in the methodologies used by Shushan and discusses the study's conclusions regarding near-death experiences.
Date: Summer 2018
Creator: Matlock, James
Partner: UNT Libraries

Book Review: Illusory Souls

Description: Review of a book titled Illusory Souls written by Gerald M. Woerlee, an anesthesiologist who is skeptical of near-death experiences. This review addresses Woerlee's ideas regarding the philosophy of the mind and the effect of pharmaceuticals on the function of the mind.
Date: Summer 2018
Creator: Rivas, Titus
Partner: UNT Libraries

Near-Death Experience Features During Various Phases Related to the Unconsciousness: An Exploratory Study of Norwegian Hospital Patients [Brief Report]

Description: Abstract: The objective of this study was to explore the states of consciousness associated with various features of near-death experience (NDE). The sample comprised 23 Norwegian adult survivors of unconsciousness associated with life threatening medical conditions, either cardiac arrest (CA; n=19) or surgery to address another type of trauma (OT; n=4). Of these, 11 CA and 4 OT patients endorsed at least one item on the Near-Death Experience Scale--Norwegian translation. We individually interviewed each of the 23 patients to ascertain their perception of the phase of unconsciousness in which each endorsed item on the NDE Scale occurred. Although most features reportedly occurred during unconsciousness, at least one item was endorsed for four other phases related to unconsciousness: before, while awakening from, after (conscious), and after (asleep/dream). Our results indicate that healthcare providers need to be prepared that ND experiencers may report clinically significant NDE features during both unconsciousness itself and that more research into this topic is warranted.
Date: Summer 2018
Creator: Buer, Øystein; Kalfoss, Mary; Weisaeth, Lars; Stifoss-Hanssen, Hans & Bendz, Bjørn
Partner: UNT Libraries

Does Cultural Context Influence Descriptions of Change After a Near-Death Experience? Exploratory Findings from an Aotearoa New Zealand Sample

Description: Abstract: A host of literature accumulated over the past 40 years attests to the powerfully transformative nature of near-death experiences (NDEs) through a consistently reported pattern of aftereffects. Many of the qualitative and quantitative studies of post-NDE changes have been conducted in the United States and in Western European nations. Although examining the cultural diversity of NDEs was recently highlighted as a research priority, no researchers to date have examined how near-death experiencers (NDErs) from Aotearoa New Zealand describe any changes they experience after their NDEs, whether these descriptions are similar to those in previous research with samples from other Western nations, and, if not, whether culturally-specific explanations might account for those cross-cultural differences. In this exploratory study, our aim was to examine these questions. Participants were 28 individuals who self-identified as NDErs. Four participants were interviewed about their NDEs, whereas a further 24 provided written accounts. All 28 accounts were thematically analyzed, with findings overall indicating that many of the NDE aftereffects reported in previous literature were also evident in our sample. In cases in which participants did not describe typical aftereffects identified in previous literature, possibly culturally specific explanations are provided.
Date: Summer 2018
Creator: Tassell-Matamua, Natasha; Steadman, Kate L. & Frewin, Karen E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Editor's Foreword

Description: Editorial statement introducing the contents of the journal issue and providing other relevant notes. This issue includes articles which address the affects of culture on near-death experiences.
Date: Summer 2018
Creator: Holden, Janice Miner
Partner: UNT Libraries