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Toward Soil Security on the Northern Great Plains

Description: "This bulletin deals with soil and water conservation problems which relate to agriculture of the northern Great Plains [of the United States]." -- p. i. "The major portion of this bulletin, beginning on page 18, is devoted to a discussion of the controls and cures for land misuse. These suggested practices, in the main, represent the methods of control that are now being used in the several demonstration areas of the Soil Conservation Service. The use of these practices in a few specific demonstration areas is included in the section beginning on page 47. The last section (p. 76) points out a democratic procedure whereby landowners and operators may effect a more appropriate use of the land through soil conservation districts." -- p. 2
Date: 1941
Creator: Rule, Glenn K. (Glenn Kenton), 1893-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Foundations for Farm Buildings

Description: This bulletin discusses different ways of constructing the foundations of farm buildings. "The following general recommendations point out common errors and are intended to assist farmers to provide suitable foundations for ordinary farm structures except where unusual soil conditions are found. The foundation of a farm building may consist of (1) continuous walls, (2) a series of piers either built in place or precast, (3) a combination of walls and piers, (4) a concrete slab laid on the ground, (5) wood posts, or (6) wood sills. The essential features necessary for the successful use of the various types are discussed under the above headings; also the thickness of walls and dimensions of piers for medium-sized structures other than heavy storages are suggested. Requirements for cellar walls are given on pages 18-21. It is necessary that foundation footings be made wide enough to support the structure on the kind of soil to be built on. The characteristics and bearing power of various soils are given on p. 3. The general method of calculating the weight on footings is given on pages 38-44. It can be used where buildings are heavy or are of a different character from those described under Types of Foundations." -- p. 1
Date: 1941
Creator: Miller, Thomas A. H. & Molander, Edward G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Brucellosis of Cattle (Bang's Disease, Infectious Abortion)

Description: This bulletin discusses the infectious disease common in cattle called brucellosis (also known as Bang's disease), which causes abortion. The causes, symptoms, and diagnosis of the disease are discussed as well as various treatments, prevention and control measures, and attempts at eradication.
Date: 1941
Creator: Eichhorn, A. & Crawford, A. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Bacterial Wilt of Corn

Description: This bulletin discusses bacterial wilt, which is a destructive disease of corn and is particularly destructive to sweet corn. It describes the causes and symptoms of the disease, methods of transmission, the effect of weather, and control measures.
Date: 1941
Creator: Elliott, Charlotte
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Ponds for Wildlife

Description: "The first purpose of this bulletin is to show how farmers and ranchers may protect their ponds from sedimentation, soil erosion, and water loss through the use of vegetation suitable as food and shelter for wildlife; the second is to give some information on the management of wildlife in farm ponds. Unless otherwise stated, the information contained in this bulletin pertains to the water area, or pond proper, and the pond area, or the land immediately adjacent to the pond and ordinarily contained within a fence." -- p. ii
Date: 1941
Creator: Allan, Philip Farley, 1909- & Davis, Cecil N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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More Food Through Conservation Farming

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin discusses in general the ways in which conservation measures increase crop production, improve pasture and range, and maintain the productivity of the soil." -- p. i. Many of these topics are discussed with regard to the war production efforts undertaken by the federal government of the United States during the World War II Era.
Date: 1943
Creator: Semple, Arthur T. (Arthur Truman), 1895-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Wood Fuel in Wartime

Description: This bulletin promotes and discusses the use of wood for fuel in the United States in order to aid wartime efforts during World War II. It describes sources of wood for fuel and the labor requirements for wood production and harvesting.
Date: 1942
Creator: Hall, Robert T. & Dickerman, M. B. (Murlyn Bennet), 1912-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Regrassing for Soil Protection in the Southwest

Description: "This bulletin is designed to help the stockmen and farmers, of the Southwest [United States] particularly, in reestablishing depleted ranges where unfavorable climatic conditions and heavy demands on the range have served to make improvement of the range by natural means a slow and difficult process. It discusses the latest methods of artificial revegetation that have proved most effective in regrassing the ranges. It also discusses the more promising grasses and indicates that areas to which they are adapted. It explains the latest methods for harvesting seed and establishing grass on various sites under a wide range of conditions as to elevation, temperature, rainfall, and soils." -- p. i
Date: 1942
Creator: Flory, Evan L. & Marshall, Charles G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Stubble-Mulch Farming for Soil Defense

Description: "Stubble-mulch farming, spectacular in its recent spread across the West, has sound scientific support. In one form or another, it has been demonstrating its advantages on experimental plots and in isolated field trials for many years. It is a practice that furthers the highest crop and livestock production compatible with the principle of soil security. It is a simple but effective method that will help us to avoid in the present emergency the disastrous aftermaths of the plow-up program of the 1920's. Materials for mulching are at hand -- products of the land itself -- waiting to be used for the retention of crop-making moisture and soil. Equipment can be bought on the market, or it can be rigged up by the farmer himself. Stubble-mulch farming can be fitted into a general conservation system -- applied to grain fields, row-crop land, and strip-croppered areas. It is flexible and economical, requires less mule power or machine power." -- p. ii
Date: 1942
Creator: Carter, L. S. (Logan Sampson), 1906- & McDole, G. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Strip Cropping for War Production

Description: "In the nation's effort to produce adequate quantities of all agricultural products to meet the war needs of the United Nations, conservation assumes added importance. Advancements in the management of croplands to conserve soil and moisture, which have come about in recent years as a result of experimentation and the experiences of many farmers, show that conservation increases crop yields. Strip cropping is one of the conservation practices. In its various forms and patterns, it is applicable to a large area of the United States. With the farmer rests the major responsibility of obtaining conservation on the land. Each farmer should examine for himself the need of strip cropping his cultivated land and in doing so should find the information contained in this bulletin helpful. The kinds of strip cropping, the factors influencing their use, methods of application, value in conserving soil and moisture, and the adaptation of strip cropping to the northeastern and north-central, the southeastern and western Gulf, the Great Plains, and the far Western States are discussed." -- p. ii
Date: 1943
Creator: Tower, Harold E. & Gardner, Harry H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Improving Range Conditions for Wartime Livestock Production

Description: "The improvement of range lands to meet the demands for increased livestock production for war purposes is highly important. To bring about the greatest improvement with the least expense it is necessary to know what kinds of range lands will best respond to improvement measures. This bulletin discusses range conditions and describes that characteristics of soil and forage by which the rancher may determine which of his lands are in need of improvement." -- p. i
Date: 1942
Creator: Renner, Frederic Gordon, 1897- & Johnson, E. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Persian Clover

Description: This bulletin discusses the cultivation of Persian clover, a forage crop for both feed and green manure in the southern United States. Fertilizer requirements and seed production are among the topics discussed.
Date: 1943
Creator: Hollowell, E. A. (Eugene Amos)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Pea Aphid on Peas and Methods for Its Control

Description: "The pea aphid is present wherever peas are grown in the United States and is one of the most serious insect enemies of this important food crop. It has many generations a year, and under favorable conditions large and destructive populations of the pest may develop in a relatively short time. Natural enemies cannot be depended on for effective control, and therefore insecticides must be applied when threatening infestations of the aphid develop. Several insecticides and methods for their use are discussed in this bulletin. The choice of these will depend on local conditions, including the type of machinery and insecticide available, but any of them will be effective if applied as directed." -- p. i
Date: 1943
Creator: Dudley, J. E. & Bronson, T. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Muscadine Grapes: A Fruit for the South

Description: This bulletin discusses the cultivation of muscadine grapes in the southern United States. Topics discussed include propagation, pruning and training, soil management, fertilizers, harvesting, common diseases, and varieties.
Date: 1961
Creator: United States. Agricultural Research Service. Crops Research Division.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Muscadine Grapes: A Fruit for the South

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cultivation of muscadine grapes in the southern United States. Topics discussed include propagation, pruning and training, soil management, fertilizers, harvesting, common diseases, and varieties.
Date: 1965
Creator: United States. Agricultural Research Service. Crops Research Division.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Muscadine Grapes: A Fruit for the South

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cultivation of muscadine grapes in the southern United States. Topics discussed include propagation, pruning and training, soil management, fertilizers, harvesting, common diseases, and varieties.
Date: 1971
Creator: United States. Agricultural Research Service. Plant Science Research Division.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Muscadine Grapes: A Fruit for the South

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cultivation of muscadine grapes in the southern United States. Topics discussed include propagation, pruning and training, soil management, fertilizers, harvesting, common diseases, and varieties.
Date: 1973
Creator: United States. Agricultural Research Service. Northeastern Region.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Warm-Water Fishponds

Description: "Fishponds are successful if they are managed well. To provide recreation and supplement income, they must afford good fishing. Mistakes in construction, stocking, and management can lead to disappointments. This bulletin is concerned only with warm-water ponds -- not with cool-water or cold-water ponds. It points out the importance of a favorable site, proper pond construction, erosion control, correct stocking, fertilizing, and weed control. And it tells how to manage a warm-water pond for fishing. By following these guides, you can have a lasting pond that can be fished many times a year." -- p. ii
Date: 1977
Creator: Dillon, Olan W., 1917-; Neely, William W., 1915-; Davison, Verne E. (Verne Elbert), 1904- & Compton, Lawrence V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Catfish Farming

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the farming of channel catfish, which is the most commonly grown species of catfish. Catfish can be grown successfully in ponds, cages, or raceways. Topics discussed include water quality, spawning, feeding, harvesting, diseases, and production costs.
Date: 1981
Creator: United States. Soil Conservation Service.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Soil Productivity As Affected by Crop Rotation

Description: This bulletin discusses the effect of crop rotation practices on soil productivity, and also describes the possible effects of fertilizers and other forms of soil improvement. "The purposes of the discussion which follows are to emphasize the value of crop rotation in farming economy and to stress the principles of rotation in their relation to the maintenance of soil productivity and to soil improvement." -- p. 5
Date: 1926
Creator: Weir, Wilbert W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Forage Crops and Their Culture in Northern Nebraska and the Dakotas

Description: "This bulletin deals with those cultivated forage crops that seem of greatest promise for the dry-farming districts of northern Nebraska and the Dakotas west of the ninety-eighth meridian. Frequent crop failures in the more arid portions of these States result from a low annual precipitation, the irregularity of its amount and distribution during the growing season, and high evaporation. Under conditions of extreme drought, cultivated crops can seldom be economically substituted for native vegetation, and the utilization of such lands for grazing and the cutting of wild hay is most generally advisable. Greater forage production on the better lands may be effected by growing certain cultivated legumes, grasses, and roots." -- p. ii.
Date: 1927
Creator: Garver, Samuel
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Rabbit Skins for Fur

Description: "With the disappearance of many of the fine-pelted wild fur bearers from certain parts of the United States, the use of rabbit skins is steadily increasing. Aided by modern processes, American fur dressers and dyers have become so expert in changing the colors and appearances of furs that in many instances the pelt of the rabbit, under a variety of trade names, is replacing many that are more attractive and costly.... Methods of handling rabbit skins, from the time the pelt is removed until it reaches the raw-fur market or is tanned for home use, are described in this bulletin." -- p. ii
Date: 1927
Creator: Green, D. Monroe
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Propagation of Game Birds

Description: "Success in the propagation of game birds has been enjoyed in the United States by individuals, by sportsmen's organizations, and by State game departments. There have been failures, of course, but methods that assure success are known. These are treated concisely in this bulletin.... Developed methods need only be carried out with energy and intelligence to produce satisfactory results. Raising game birds may be made profitable, since the demand exceeds the supply of adult birds for breeding, of both young and and adults for restocking, and of eggs for distribution to farmers and shooting clubs." -- p. ii. Among the birds discussed are pheasants, quail, partridges, grouse, turkeys, ducks, geese, and swans.
Date: 1927
Creator: McAtee, W. L. (Waldo Lee), 1883-1962
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Chestnut Blight

Description: "Chestnut blight, caused by a fungus brought into this country from Asia before 1904, is responsible for the death of millions of acres of chestnut growth in New England and the Middle Atlantic States. The disease spread rapidly to nearly all parts of the range of the native chestnut, and the remaining stands of the southern Appalachians face certain destruction. The present known distribution, its symptoms, and the fungus that causes the disease are described. The blight fungus itself does not have any effect upon the strength of chestnut timber, and blight-killed trees can be utilized for poles, posts, cordwood, lumber, and extract wood. Search is being made for native and foreign chestnuts resistant to the disease in the hope of finding a tree suitable for replacing the rapidly disappearing stands. Seedlings of Asiatic chestnuts, which have considerable natural resistance even though not immune, are being tested in the United States." -- p. ii
Date: 1930
Creator: Gravatt, G. F. & Gill, L. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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