Search Results

open access

13th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes: Summary Discussion, 10-13 August 2003, Vail, Colorado

Description: The 13th Workshop discussion sessions addressed recent progress, critical issues in implementing new technologies, and the role of fundamental R&D in the growing PV industry. For the first time, we included a rump session, which was held on Sunday evening, August 10. This session included a panel of representatives, from various photovoltaic companies, who led a discussion of''R&D Challenges in Si PV.'' A special poster/presentation session was held on Monday evening, August 11, in which NREL/DOE subcontractors highlighted their results of research performed during the current subcontract period. This session served as a subcontract review. The workshop offered special sessions to discuss: (1) High-Efficiency Si Solar Cells, which reviewed progress made in implementing high-efficiency Si solar cell fabrication processes in the manufacturing environment; (2) Advanced Processing, as future potential approaches for making Si solar cells; (3) Commercial Issues, which addressed basic understanding behind recent processes that have been used by the PV industry; and (4) Automation and Equipment, to address capabilities and requirements of new manufacturing equipment.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Sopori, B.; Sinton, R.; Tan, T. & Swanson, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

2004 research briefs :Materials and Process Sciences Center.

Description: This report is the latest in a continuing series that highlights the recent technical accomplishments associated with the work being performed within the Materials and Process Sciences Center. Our research and development activities primarily address the materials-engineering needs of Sandia's Nuclear-Weapons (NW) program. In addition, we have significant efforts that support programs managed by the other laboratory business units. Our wide range of activities occurs within six thematic areas: Materials Aging and Reliability, Scientifically Engineered Materials, Materials Processing, Materials Characterization, Materials for Microsystems, and Materials Modeling and Simulation. We believe these highlights collectively demonstrate the importance that a strong materials-science base has on the ultimate success of the NW program and the overall DOE technology portfolio.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Cieslak, Michael J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

6th International Microbeam Workshop

Description: The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Prise, Dr Kevin M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming, Semi-Annual Progress Report: July 1 - December 31, 2003

Description: This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the second six months (July 1, 2003-December 31, 2003) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Robinson, Peggy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

ADVANCED CO2 CYCLE POWER GENERATION

Description: Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-FC26-02NT41621 to develop a conceptual design and determine the performance characteristics of a new IGCC plant configuration that facilitates CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration. This new configuration will be designed to achieve CO{sub 2} sequestration without the need for water gas shifting and CO{sub 2} separation, and may eliminate the need for a separate sequestration compressor. This research introduces a novel concept of using CO{sub 2} as a working fluid for an advanced coal gasification based power generation system, where it generates power with high system efficiency while concentrating CO{sub 2} for sequestration. This project supports the DOE research objective of development of concepts for the capture and storage of CO{sub 2}.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Nehrozoglu, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

ADVANCED HEAT EXCHANGERS USING TUNABLE NANOSCALE-MOLECULAR ASSEMBLY

Description: Steam condensation heat transfer on smooth horizontal tubes and enhanced tubes (TURBO-CDI and TURBO-CSL) along with nanoscale hydrophobic coated tubes was studied experimentally. Hydrophobic coatings have been created through self-assembled mono layers (SAMs) on copper alloy (99.9% Cu, 0.1% P) surfaces to enhance steam condensation through dropwise condensation. In general, a SAM system with a long-chain, hydrophobic group is nano-resistant, meaning that such a system forms a protective hydrophobic layer with negligible heat transfer resistance but a much stronger bond. When compared to complete filmwise condensation, the SAM coating on a plain tube increased the condensation heat transfer rate by a factor of 3 for copper alloy surfaces, under vacuum pressure (33.86 kPa) and by a factor of about 8 times when operated at atmospheric pressure (101 kPa). Lifetime of maintaining dropwise condensation is greatly dependent on the processing conditions.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Kim, Kwang J.; Bell, Thomas W.; Vemuri, Srinivas & Govindaraju, Sailaja
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG

Description: The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program initiated this quarter, provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principle activity during this first reporting period were preparing for and conducting a project kick-off meeting, working through plans for the project implementation, and beginning the conceptual design of the test section.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Reome, Scott & Davies, Dan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

ADVANCED, LOW/ZERO EMISSION BOILER DESIGN AND OPERATION

Description: This document reviews the work performed during the quarter October-December 2003. Task 1 (Site Preparation) had been completed in the previous reporting period. In this reporting period, one week of combustion parameters optimization has been performed in Task 2 (experimental test performance) of the project. Under full-oxy conditions (100% air replacement with O{sub 2}-enriched flue gas) in 1.5MW{sub th} coal-fired boiler, the following parameters have been varied and their impact on combustion characteristics measured: the recirculated flue gas flow rate has been varied from 80% to 95% of total flue gas flow, and the total oxygen flow rate into the primary air zone of the boiler has been set to levels ranging from 15% to 25% of the total oxygen consumption in the overall combustion. In current reporting period, significant progress has also been made in Task 3 (Techno-Economic Study) of the project: mass and energy balance calculations and cost assessment have been completed on plant capacity of 533MW{sub e} gross output while applying the methodology described in previous reporting periods. Air-fired PC Boiler and proposed Oxygen-fired PC Boiler have been assessed, both for retrofit application and new unit. The current work schedule is to review in more details the experimental data collected so far as well as the economics results obtained on the 533MWe cases, and to develop a work scope for the remainder of the project. Approximately one week of pilot testing is expected during the first quarter of 2004, including mercury emission measurement and heat transfer characterization. The project was on hold from mid-November through December 2003 due to non-availability of funds. Out of the {approx}$785k allocated DOE funds in this project, $497k have been spent to date ($480 reported so far), mainly in site preparation, test performance and economics assessment. In addition to DOE allocated funds, …
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Chatel-Pelage, Fabienne
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Aggregation of Distributed Generation Assets in New York State (Revised)

Description: This report describes a project to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of aggregating distributed generating resources in New York State. This project demonstrates a system that allows distributed generation (DG) to participate in competitive markets in much the same way as large central-station power plants. This approach involves aggregating the distributed demand-side resources into a single transaction entity consistent with the requirements of the New York Independent System Operator (NYISO). This single entity then buys or sells capacity and energy (i.e., curtailment) in NYISO markets.
Date: January 1, 2004
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Analysis of Current Field Data

Description: This report provides a concise summary of the information collected and analyzed regarding the leak characteristics which define them as applicable candidates for pressure activated sealant technology. This information covers Office of Pipeline Safety reported incidents from 1985 to 1997 and was collected from existing data sources as well as operator and service company input.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Romano, Michael A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Analysis of Devonian Black Shales in Kentucky for Potential Carbon Dioxide Sequestration and Enhanced Natural Gas Production Quarterly Report: October-December 2003

Description: CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. …
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Nuttall, Brandon C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Analysis of KEK-ATF optics and coupling using orbit response matrix analysis

Description: LOCO is a code for analysis of the linear optics in a storage ring based on the closed orbit response to steering magnets. The analysis provides information on focusing errors, BPM gain and rotation errors, and local coupling. Here, we report the results of an application of LOCO to the KEK-ATF. Although the analysis appears to have provided useful information on the optics of the machine, it appears that one of the main aims of the study--to reduce the vertical emittance by correcting the local coupling--was not successful, and we discuss some possible reasons for this.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Wolski, A.; Nelson, J.; Ross, M.; Woodley, M. & Mishra, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Annual Report on the Environment in Japan 2003

Description: The annual report summarizes the state of the global environment and development of individual and community efforts in Japan, FY 2002. Also it introduced the environmental issues and environmental conservation measures by the Japanese government.
Date: January 2004
Creator: Japan. Kankyōshō.
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

Description: Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from microarrays, we have made progress by combining very different analytic approaches.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Wang, Xuefel (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Kang, Huining (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fields, Chris (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Cowie, Jim R. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization of Larrea Tridentata and Ambrosia Dumosa Roots Varies With Precipitation and Season in the Mojave Desert

Description: The percentage of fine roots colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi varied with season and with species in the co-dominant shrubs Lurreu tridentutu and Ambrosia dumosu at a site adjacent to the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) in the Mojave Desert. We excavated downward and outward from the shrub bases in both species to collect and examine fine roots (< 1.0 mm diameter) at monthly intervals throughout 2001 and from October 2002 to September 2003. Fungal structures became visible in cleared roots stained with trypan blue. We quantified the percent colonization of roots by AM fungi via the line intercept method. In both years and for both species, colonization was highest in fall, relatively low in spring when root growth began, increased in late spring, and decreased during summer drought periods. Increases in colonization during summer and fall reflect corresponding increases in precipitation. Spring mycorrhizal colonization is low despite peaks in soil water availability and precipitation, indicating that precipitation is not the only factor influencing mycorrhizal colonization. Because the spring decrease in mycorrhizal colonization occurs when these shrubs initiate a major flush of fine root growth, other phenological events such as competing demands for carbon by fine root initiation, early season shoot growth, and flowering may reduce carbon availability to the fungus, and hence decrease colonization. Another possibility is that root growth exceeds the rate of mycorrhizal colonization.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Apple, M. E.; Thee, C. I.; Smith-Longozo, V. L.; Cogar, C. R.; Wells, C. E. & Nowak, R. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

ASSESSMENT OF LOW COST NOVEL SORBENTS FOR COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT MERCURY CONTROL

Description: This is a Technical Report under a program funded by the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to obtain the necessary information to assess the viability of lower cost alternatives to commercially available activated carbon for mercury control in coal-fired utilities. Novel sorbent evaluations at We Energies' Pleasant Prairie Power Plant (P4) Unit 1 (no SCR in place) have been completed. Nineteen sorbents were evaluated for mercury control. A batch injection rate of 1 lb/Mmacf for 1 hour was conducted for screening purposes at a temperature of 300 F. Four sorbents were further evaluated at three injection rates and two temperatures. The multi-pollutant control test system (PoCT) was installed on P4's Unit 2 (with an SCR) and sorbent evaluations are continuing. Evaluations will continue through the end of January 2004. Tests and analysis on samples from Powerton and Valley to yield waste characterization results for the COHPAC long-term tests are continuing. A no-cost time extension for work to be completed by March 31, 2004 was granted by DOE/NETL.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Ley, Trevor
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

B lifetimes and flavour tagging at CDF Run II

Description: Data samples of {approx} 140pb{sup -1} gathered with CDF Run II's displaced vertex trigger and J/{Psi} trigger have led to measurements of B hadron lifetimes in exclusive and semileptonic modes which are presented here. Also discussed are evaluations of flavour tagging techniques in Run II data. .30.-a - 14.40.Nd.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Farrington, S. M. & U., /Glasgow
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Best Practices: Highlights of the Knowledge-Based Approach Used to Improve Weapon Acquisition

Description: Other written product issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "This is a best practices pamphlet discussing the highlights of the knowledge-based approach to improving weapons acquisition. It reviews the manufacturing processes through three phases, (1) technology development, (2) product development, and (3) production."
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Best Practices: Using A Knowledge-Based Approach To Improve Weapon Acquisition

Description: Other written product issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "At the request of Congress, we have been examining ways the Department of Defense (DOD) can optimize its investment in weapons systems, drawing on lessons learned from the best, mostly commercial, product development efforts. Leading commercial firms we have studied have developed increasingly sophisticated products in less time and at lower cost. Key to their success is their knowledge-based approach to the acquisition of new products. A knowledge-based approach is supported by incentives that encourage realism and candor. This booklet highlights the result of our work to date."
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Biohazardous waste management plan.

Description: This plan describes the process for managing non-medical biohazardous waste at Sandia National Laboratories California. It applies to operations at the Chemical and Radiation Detection Laboratory (CRDL), Building 968, and other biosafety level 1 or 2 activities at the site. It addresses the accumulation, storage, treatment and disposal of biohazardous waste and sharps waste. It also describes the procedures to comply with regulatory requirements and SNL policies applicable to non-medical biohazardous waste.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Lane, Todd W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Back to Top of Screen