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Reconciliation Report

Description: Reconciliation report with an ending account balance of $2,398.57 reconciled for the period ending on December 31, 2002.
Date: January 22, 2003
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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Influence of Clastic Dikes on Vertical Migration of Contaminants in the Vadose Zone at Hanford

Description: The purpose of this study was to examine the hypothesis that clastic dikes could form a preferential flow path through the vadose zone to the water table at the Hanford Site. Clastic dikes are subvertical structures that form within sedimentary sequences after deposition, and cut across the original sedimentary layers. They are common throughout the Hanford Site, often occurring in organized polygonal networks. In the initial phase of the project, we analyzed the large-scale geometry of the clastic dikes and developed an algorithm for simulating their spatial distribution. This result will be useful in providing maps of the potential distribution of clastic dikes in areas where they are not exposed at the surface (e.g., where covered by windblown sand or by construction of facilities like tank farms at the surface). In addition to the study of the large scale distribution of the dikes, a major focus of the project was on field, laboratory, and modeling studies of the hydrogeologic al properties of the clastic dikes and the effect that they have on transport of water through the vadose zone. These studies were performed at two field locations at the Hanford Site. We performed an extensive series of field and laboratory measurements of a large number of samples from the clastic dikes, linked with infrared (IR) and visual imagery of the clastic dikes and surrounding matrix. We developed a series of correlations from the sample data that allowed us to estimate the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of the dike and matrix at an extremely high resolution (approximately 1 mm). The resulting grids, each of which measured several meters on a side and included nearly 4 grid nodes, were used to study the distribution of moisture between the clastic dike and surrounding matrix, as well as the relative velocities that moisture would have …
Date: March 14, 2003
Creator: Murray, Christopher J.; Ward, Anderson L. & Wilson, John L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Reconnaissance of Field Sites for the Study of Chemical Weathering on the Guayana Shield, South America

Description: Despite the fact that chemical weathering of silicate rocks plays an important role in the draw-down of CO{sub 2} over geologic time scales (Berner and Berner, 1996), the overall controls on the rate of chemical weathering are still not completely understood. Lacking a mechanistic understanding of these controls, it remains difficult to evaluate a hypothesis such as that presented by Raymo and Ruddiman (1992), who suggested that enhanced weathering and CO{sub 2} draw-down resulting from the uplift of the Himalayas contributed to global cooling during the Cenozoic. At an even more fundamental level, the three to four order of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory and field weathering rates is still unresolved (White et al., 1996). There is as yet no comprehensive, mechanistic model for silicate chemical weathering that considers the coupled effects of precipitation, vadose zone flow, and chemical reactions. The absence of robust process models for silicate weathering and the failure to resolve some of these important questions may in fact be related-the controls on the overall rates of weathering cannot be understood without considering the weathering environment as one in which multiple, time-dependent chemical and physical processes are coupled (Malmstrom, 2000). Once chemical weathering is understood at a mechanistic process level, the important controls on chemical weathering (physical erosion, temperature, precipitation) can be folded into larger scale models tracking the global carbon cycle. Our goal in this study was to carry out the preliminary work needed to establish a field research site for chemical weathering om the Cuayana Shield in South America. The Guayana Shield is a Precambrian province greater than 1.5 billion years old covering portions of Venezuela, Guyana (the country), Surinam, French Guiana, and Brazil (Figure 1). More important than the age of the rocks themselves, however, is the age of the erosion surface developed on the …
Date: February 1, 2003
Creator: Steefell, C. I.; Viani, B. E.; Ramirez, A. & Lee, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Laser Peening--Strengthening Metals to Improve Fatigue Lifetime and Retard Stress-Induced Corrosion Cracking in Gears, Bolts and Cutter

Description: Laser peening is an emerging modern process that impresses a compressive stress into the surfaces of metals. Treatment can reduce the rate of fatigue cracking and stress-corrosion-cracking in metals (such as gears, bolts and cutters) needed for tunnel boring and other construction & mining applications. Laser peening could also be used to form metals or alloys into a precise shape without yielding and leaving both sulfates in a crack resistant compressive state.
Date: August 20, 2003
Creator: Hackel, L. A. & Chen, H. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Feasibility Study of Passive Aerosol Sampler for Bio-Agent Detection

Description: We propose to establish the feasibility of a passive aerosol sampler for bio-agent collection through laboratory experiments and theoretical analysis. The passive sampler, unlike the typical active sampler, does not require pumps and complex fixtures, and thereby allows for large-scale field monitoring not possible with current active samplers. We plan to conduct experiments using model (both biological and non-biological) aerosols generated in an instrumented test chamber and compare the particles collected on various passive samplers to conventional filter samplers, commercial aerosol measuring instruments and to conventional surface swipes. Theoretical analysis will be used to design prototype passive samplers and to compare experimental results with theory. A successful feasibility study will be used to seek outside funding for applications that will greatly enhance current LLNL programs such as NARAC's atmospheric dispersal modeling, NAI's programs in bioagent monitoring in public locations and fixed sampling stations, and EPD's environmental monitoring and decontamination research. In addition, the feasibility study will position us favorably for responding to new calls for proposals by NIH and EPA for large scale environmental studies.
Date: March 5, 2003
Creator: Keating, G. & Bergman, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Entangled States, Holography and Quantum Surfaces

Description: Starting with an elementary discussion of quantum holography, we show that entangled quantum states of qubits provide a ''local'' representation of the global geometry and topology of quantum Riemann surfaces. This representation may play an important role in both mathematics and physics. Indeed, the simplest way to represent the fundamental objects in a ''theory of everything'' may be as muti-qubit entangled states.
Date: August 13, 2003
Creator: Chapline, G F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: THEORY STUDIES FOR POLARIZED PP SCATTERING (VOLUME 53)

Description: In the past two runs of RHIC, the first measurements with polarized proton beams have been performed. For many years to come, the RHIC spin program will offer exciting physics, exploring QCD and the nucleon in new ways. The aim of this small workshop was to attract several spin theorists to the center for about two weeks, in order to collaborate with both experimentalists and theorists at RBRC, and to initiate and/or complete studies of relevance to RHIC spin. A major focus of polarized-pp measurements at RHIC is on measuring the spin-dependent gluon density, {Delta}g. A channel for accessing {Delta}g is high-p{sub T} pion production. The unpolarized cross section for this reaction has been measured by PHENIX and was found in good agreement with a perturbative-QCD based (NLO) calculation. It was a remarkable and exciting coincidence that PHENIX presented also the first results for the spin asymmetry for {rvec p}{rvec p} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}X during this workshop. This sparked a lot of additional activity and discussion. First steps toward the interpretation of the data were taken. Marco Stratmann and Barbara Jager (Regensburg University) presented recent work on the NLO calculation of the polarized cross section and the spin asymmetry, setting the stage for future full analysis of the data in terms of {Delta}g. Applications to {rvec e}{rvec p} scattering, very relevant to eRHIC, were also worked out and published during this workshop. Stratmann also discussed the procedure of NLO calculations for the case of transverse polarization in pp scattering.
Date: September 15, 2003
Creator: KRETZER,S. VOGELSANG,W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP (VOLUME 55) COLLECTIVE FLOW AND QGP PROPERTIES.

Description: The first three years of RHIC physics, with Au/Au collisions induced at 65, 130 and 200 GeV per nucleon pair, produced dramatic results, particularly with respect to collective observables such as transverse flow and anisotropies in transverse momentum spectra. It has become clear that the data show very strong rescattering at very early times of the reaction, strong enough in fact to be described by the hydrodynamic limit. Therefore, with today's experiments, we are able to investigate the equation of state of hot quark gluon matter, discuss its thermodynamic properties and relate them to experimental observables. At this workshop we came together to discuss our latest efforts both in the theoretical description of heavy ion collisions as well as most recent experimental results that ultimately allow us to extract information on the properties of RHIC matter. About 50 participants registered for the workshop, but many more dropped in from the offices at BNL. The workshop lasted for three days, of which each day was assigned a special topic on which the talks focused. On the first day we dealt with the more general question what the strong collective phenomena observed in RHIC collisions tell us about the properties and the dynamics of RHIC matter. The second day covered all different aspects of momentum anisotropies, and interesting new experimental results were presented for the first time. On the third day, we focused on the late fireball dynamics and the breakdown of the assumption of thermalization. New experimental observables were discussed, which will deliver more information of how the expanding fireball breaks up, once the frequent interaction ceases.
Date: November 17, 2003
Creator: BASS,S. ESUMI,S. HEINZ,U. KOLB,P. SHURYAK,E. XU,N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Environmentally Benign Stab Detonators

Description: This effort attempts to demonstrate that environmentally acceptable energetic sol-gel coated flash metal multilayer nanocomposites can be used to replace current impact initiated devices (IIDs) which have hazardous and toxic components. Successful completion of this project will result in IIDs that include innocuous compounds, have sufficient output energy for initiation, meet current military specifications, are small, cost competitive, and perform as well as or better than current devices. We expect flash metal multilayer and sol-gel to be generic technologies applicable to a wide range of devices, especially in small caliber ammunition and sub-munitions. We will replace the NOL-130 mixture with a nanocomposite that consists of a mechanically robust energetic multilayer foil that has been coated with a sol-gel energetic material. The exothermic reactions are activated in this nanocomposite are the transformation of the multilayer material to its respective intermetallic alloy and the thermite reaction, which is characterized by very high temperatures, a small pressure pulse, and hot particle ejection. The proposed materials and their reaction products consist of, but are not limited to aluminum, nickel, iron, aluminum oxide, titanium, iron oxide and boron. These materials have much more desirable environmental and health characteristics than the NOL-130 composition.
Date: December 15, 2003
Creator: Gash, A.; Barbee, T.; Simpson, R.; Satcher, J. & Walton, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Updated Volumetric Expansion Factors for K Basin Sludge During Storage

Description: Sludge has accumulated in the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins at the Hanford Site. This sludge contains metallic uranium and uranium oxides that will corrode, hydrate, and generate and consume gases during containerized storage. From these corrosion reactions, two sludge expansion mechanisms can be expected: 1) expansion of the volume of the sludge solids from the generation of corrosion oxidation products that occupy more space than the starting-state sludge; and 2) expansion of the bulk sludge volume from the retention of hydrogen gas bubbles. This report provides a review and updated projections of the volumetric expansion occurring due to corrosion and gas retention during the containerized storage of K Basin sludge. New design and safety basis volume expansion values are provided for the following sludge streams: KW Floor, KW North Loadout Pit, KW canister, and fuel piece sludge.
Date: March 14, 2003
Creator: Schmidt, Andrew J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) & Delegard, Calvin H. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Impact of Humidity, Temperature and Ultraviolet Light on the Near-Field Environmental Fate of Pinacolyl Alcohol, Methyl Iodide, Methylphosphonic Dichloride (DCMP) and Thionyl Chloride Using an Environmental Wind Tunnel

Description: Understanding the near-field fate of parent chemicals and their decay products in the atmosphere provides essential information for the development of remote chemical sensors. To elucidate the near-field fate of candidate chemical signatures, selected gas phase compounds were introduced into atmospheres of varying humidity, temperature and incident light flux. These atmospheres were maintained in an environmental wind tunnel for periods typical of near-field transport scenarios. The range of humidity and temperature into which the compounds were emitted encompassed arid, temperate, and tropical values. Simulated sunlight exposure was used to evaluate the impact of time of release on signature composition. The rates of compound decay and evolution of transformation products under the various environmental conditions were monitored in real time. A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer were used to determine chemical concentration, evaluate detectability, and identify potential interferences to the detection capability. Specifically, this report describes the initial system function tests with pinacolyl alcohol and methyl iodide and subsequent atmospheric fate experiments with methylphosphonic dichloride and thionyl chloride. Test system function was evaluated using pinacolyl alcohol because as a relatively non-reactive compound, it served as a negative control for the system. Methyl iodide is a compound known to photodissociate in the atmosphere and therefore was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the test system to detect a known positive effect under specific conditions. Results from the function tests showed that sufficient vapor generation into the large volume of the wind tunnel could be accomplished within a reasonable time period and that the operating conditions of the wind tunnel did not appear to affect the decay rate of the two initial test chemicals. As expected, no near-field decay of pinacolyl alcohol was observed under a wide range of temperature and humidity conditions. Further, both analytical techniques could detect …
Date: January 24, 2003
Creator: Driver, Crystal J.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Su, Yin-Fong; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Fellows, Robert J.; Magnuson, Jon K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Addressing Problems with Scene-Based Wave Front Sensing

Description: Scene-Based Wave Front Sensing uses the correlation between successive subimages to determine phase aberrations which blur digital images. Adaptive Optics technology uses deformable mirrors to correct for these phase aberrations and make the images clearer. The correlation between temporal subimages gives tip-tilt information. If these images do not have identical image content, tip-tilt estimations may be incorrect. Motion detection is necessary to help avoid errors initiated by dynamic subimage content. In this document, I will discuss why edge detection fails as a motion detection method on low resolution images and how thresholding the normalized variance of individual pixels is successful for motion detection.
Date: August 5, 2003
Creator: Chan, C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Building a Bridge to the Ethanol Industry--Follow-up Project: Period of Performance; February 22, 2001- December 31, 2002

Description: Subcontract report summarizing results of a trial of a corn fiber pretreatment process. The results of the trial showed that the carbohydrates in the pretreated liquid and solid streams are readily hydrolyzed by enzymes and easily fermentable to ethanol by yeast.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Ladisch, M.; Mosier, N.; Welch, G. & Dien, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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NSLS 2002 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2002).

Description: The year 2002 has been another highly productive year at the NSLS and an impressive array of highlights from this scientific activity is included in this Activity Report. They have taken significant steps this past year toward better supporting beamlines and users. The number of user science support staff has been increased by about ten positions. They have also worked with their users, DOE, and the other DOE synchrotron facilities to develop a new, more flexible user access policy. Doing things safely remains a top priority, and they are reviewing their training and safety requirements to ensure they are thorough and everyone fully understands the necessity of abiding by them. A major development this past year was approval from DOE for BNL to begin the conceptual design of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). The CFN will have a dramatic impact on nanoscience in the Northeast, facilitating the synthesis, characterization and scientific exploration of new classes of novel nanostructured materials. It will be located adjacent to the NSLS and a number of NSLS beamlines will be optimized to serve the needs of the nanoscience community. The NSLS and CFN user programs will be coordinated to facilitate easy access to both in a single visit. The VUV and X-Ray rings operated with excellent reliability as a result of continued attention to aging critical systems. The DUV-FEL achieved several important milestones this year, including production of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) laser light at 400 nm and 266 nm, laser seeded saturation at 266 nm, and the first observation of High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) light at 266 nm, with a third harmonic at 89 nm. Light from the DUV-FEL is now enabling user science experiments in ion pair imaging and they look forward to an expanding user program and a continued series …
Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: Miller, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Acoustic Propagation in a Water-Filled Cylindrical Pipe

Description: This study was concerned with the physics of the propagation of a tone burst of high frequency sound in a steel water-filled pipe. The choice of the pulse was rather arbitrary, so that this work in no way can be considered as recommending a particular pulse form. However, the MATLAB computer codes developed in this study are general enough to carry out studies of pulses of various forms. Also, it should be pointed out that the codes as written are quite time consuming. A computation of the complete field, including all 5995 modes, requires several hours on a desktop computer. The time required by such computations as these is a direct consequence of the bandwidths, frequencies and sample rates employed. No attempt was made to optimize these codes, and it is assumed that much can be done in this regard.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Sullivan, E. J. & Candy, J. V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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New Approaches to Quantum Computing Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Description: The power of a quantum computer (QC) relies on the fundamental concept of the superposition in quantum mechanics and thus allowing an inherent large-scale parallelization of computation. In a QC, binary information embodied in a quantum system, such as spin degrees of freedom of a spin-1/2 particle forms the qubits (quantum mechanical bits), over which appropriate logical gates perform the computation. In classical computers, the basic unit of information is the bit, which can take a value of either 0 or 1. Bits are connected together by logic gates to form logic circuits to implement complex logical operations. The expansion of modern computers has been driven by the developments of faster, smaller and cheaper logic gates. As the size of the logic gates become smaller toward the level of atomic dimensions, the performance of such a system is no longer considered classical but is rather governed by quantum mechanics. Quantum computers offer the potentially superior prospect of solving computational problems that are intractable to classical computers such as efficient database searches and cryptography. A variety of algorithms have been developed recently, most notably Shor's algorithm for factorizing long numbers into prime factors in polynomial time and Grover's quantum search algorithm. The algorithms that were of only theoretical interest as recently, until several methods were proposed to build an experimental QC. These methods include, trapped ions, cavity-QED, coupled quantum dots, Josephson junctions, spin resonance transistors, linear optics and nuclear magnetic resonance. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely capable of constructing small QCs and several algorithms have been implemented successfully. NMR-QC differs from other implementations in one important way that it is not a single QC, but a statistical ensemble of them. Thus, quantum computing based on NMR is considered as ensemble quantum computing. In NMR quantum computing, the spins with non-zero …
Date: February 7, 2003
Creator: Colvin, M. & Krishnan, V. V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Nuclear structure with accurate chiral perturbation theory nucleon-nucleon potential: Application to 6Li and 10B

Description: The authors calculate properties of A = 6 system using the accurate charge-dependent nucleon-nucleon (NN) potential at fourth order of chiral perturbation theory. By application of the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) and a variational calculation in the harmonic oscillator basis with basis size up to 16 {h_bar}{Omega} they obtain the {sup 6}Li binding energy of 28.5(5) MeV and a converged excitation spectrum. Also, they calculate properties of {sup 10}B using the same NN potential in a basis space of up to 8 {h_bar}{Omega}. The results are consistent with results obtained by standard accurate NN potentials and demonstrate a deficiency of Hamiltonians consisting of only two-body terms. At this order of chiral perturbation theory three-body terms appear. It is expected that inclusion of such terms in the Hamiltonian will improve agreement with experiment.
Date: October 14, 2003
Creator: Navratil, P & Caurier, E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges and Irradiated Metallic Uranium Fuel Particles Series III Testing

Description: The path forward for managing of Hanford K Basin sludge calls for it to be packaged, shipped, and stored at T Plant until final processing at a future date. An important consideration for the design and cost of retrieval, transportation, and storage systems is the potential for heat and gas generation through oxidation reactions between uranium metal and water. This report, the third in a series (Series III), describes work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess corrosion and gas generation from irradiated metallic uranium particles (fuel particles) with and without K Basin sludge addition. The testing described in this report consisted of 12 tests. In 10 of the tests, 4.3 to 26.4 g of fuel particles of selected size distribution were placed into 60- or 800-ml reaction vessels with 0 to 100 g settled sludge. In another test, a single 3.72-g fuel fragment (i.e., 7150-mm particle) was placed in a 60 ml reaction vessel with no added sludge. The twelfth test contained only sludge. The fuel particles were prepared by crushing archived coupons (samples) from an irradiated metallic uranium fuel element. After loading the sludge materials (whether fuel particles, mixtures of fuel particles and sludge, or sludge-only) into reaction vessels, the solids were covered with an excess of K Basin water, the vessels closed and connected to a gas measurement manifold, and the vessels back-flushed with inert neon cover gas. The vessels were then heated to a constant temperature. The gas pressures and temperatures were monitored continuously from the times the vessels were purged. Gas samples were collected at various times during the tests, and the samples analyzed by mass spectrometry. Data on the reaction rates of uranium metal fuel particles with water as a function of temperature and particle size were generated. The data were …
Date: August 1, 2003
Creator: Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Elmore, Monte R.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Report on LCI Database Project Meeting of Interests; Period of Performance: May 7, 2001--December 1, 2001

Description: This is a report of the Meeting of Interests for the Life-cycle Inventory (LCI) Database Project hosted by the Ford Motor Company. The meeting was held to explain the project, discuss related issues and concerns, and to seek the support of a broad spectrum of relevant organizations. The ultimate goal of the project is to develop publicly available LCI Data modules for commonly used materials, products, and processes.
Date: August 1, 2003
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Block Matching for Object Tracking

Description: Models which describe road traffic patterns can be helpful in detection and/or prevention of uncommon and dangerous situations. Such models can be built by the use of motion detection algorithms applied to video data. Block matching is a standard technique for encoding motion in video compression algorithms. We explored the capabilities of the block matching algorithm when applied for object tracking. The goal of our experiments is two-fold: (1) to explore the abilities of the block matching algorithm on low resolution and low frame rate video and (2) to improve the motion detection performance by the use of different search techniques during the process of block matching. Our experiments showed that the block matching algorithm yields good object tracking results and can be used with high success on low resolution and low frame rate video data. We observed that different searching methods have small effect on the final results. In addition, we proposed a technique based on frame history, which successfully overcame false motion caused by small camera movements.
Date: October 13, 2003
Creator: Gyaourova, A; Kamath, C & Cheung, S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Retrieval and Pipeline Transfer Assessment of Hanford Tank 241-AN-105 Waste

Description: This study assesses five steps for Tank 241-AN-105 waste retrieval and subsequent pipeline transfer: 1. Remove supernatant liquid waste from AN-105 and transfer it through a pipeline with inline dilution with water (1st liquid waste transfer). 2. Add water (as a diluent) to Tank AN-105. 3. Mix the saltcake waste and water with mixer pumps to dissolve soluble solids. 4. Let undissolved solids settle to the tank bottom. 5. Remove the resulting supernatant liquid waste from Tank AN-105 (2nd liquid waste transfer). To assess these five steps for waste retrieval and pipeline transfer, AN-105 waste rheology was measured and solids identified with bright field image, select area diffraction, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. By combining available in situ and laboratory data, an AN-105 specific viscosity model was developed that can change from several centiPoise of viscosity to tens of millions of centiPoise as a function of strain rate and solid concentration. This viscosity mo del was implemented into the AN-105 computer model to simulate pump jet mixing. The report also evaluates AN-105 slurry waste transfer to AP-102 and AP-104 through a 3-inch (0.07-m) pipeline.
Date: January 15, 2003
Creator: Onishi, Yasuo; Tingey, Joel M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Liu, Jun; Terrones, Guillermo; Yokuda, Satoru T. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Re-Assessing the Maximum Allowed Infrared (IR) Power for Enchanced Layering in a Conduction Dominated Cryogenic NIF-Scale Hohlraum

Description: Recent measurements of the infrared (IR) absorption coefficient of CH and CD capsules differ significantly from earlier estimated values from thin flat samples. The optimum wavelength for IR enhanced layering of DT and D{sub 2} ice layers inside of a NIF scale hohlraum depends on the relative ice and capsule absorption coefficients. This update of a previous memo shows the maximum ice heating with IR as a function of ice and capsule absorption instead of at discrete wavelengths. Also discussed is the leverage of other parameters, such as the IR absorption of the hohlraum wall and thermal conductivities of the support rods and exchange gas. The most likely capsule and ice absorption values limit the IR heating to between 2-7 Q{sub DT}. We find most leverage of the IR heating comes from increasing the ice to capsule absorption ratio. As before, this is the conduction only limit to IR, with convection potentially playing a large role.
Date: August 11, 2003
Creator: Kozioziemski, B J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Laser Science and Technology Program Annual Report-2002 NIF Programs Directorate

Description: The Laser Science and Technology (LS&T) Program's mission is to develop advanced lasers, optics, materials technologies, and applications to solve problems and create new capabilities of importance to the nation and the Laboratory. A top, near-term priority is to provide technical support in the deployment and upgrade of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our other program activities synergistically develop technologies that are consistent with the goals of the NIF Directorate and develop state-of-the-art capabilities. The primary objectives of LS&T activities in 2002 have been fourfold--(a) to support deployment of hardware and to enhance laser and optics performance for NIF, (b) to develop high-energy petawatt laser science and technology for the Department of Energy (DOE), (c) to develop advanced solid-state laser systems and optical components for the Department of Defense (DoD), and (d) to invent, develop, and deliver improved concepts and hardware for other government agencies and industry. LS&T activities during 2002 focused on seven major areas: (1) NIF Project-LS&T led major advances in the deployment of NIF Final Optics Assembly (FOA) and the development of 30.1 optics processing and treatment technologies to enhance NIF's operations and performance capabilities. (2) Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP)-LS&T personnel continued development of ultrashort-pulse lasers and high-power, large-aperture optics for applications in SSP, extreme-field science and national defense. To enhance the high-energy petawatt (HEPW) capability in NIF, LS&T continued development of advanced compressor-grating and front-end laser technologies utilizing optical-parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA). (3) High-energy-density physics and inertial fusion energy-LS&T continued development of kW- to MW-class, diode-pumped, solid-state laser (DPSSL). (4) Department of Defense (DoD)-LS&T continued development of a 100 kw-class solid-state heat-capacity laser (SSHCL) for missile defense. (5) Nuclear energy applications-LS&T continued to develop laser-shock peening technology to improve the service lifetime of metal nuclear waste containment canisters designed for DOES Yucca Mountain Project. (6) Materials …
Date: March 1, 2003
Creator: Hackel, L. & Chen, H. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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