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Acoustic Propagation in a Water-Filled Cylindrical Pipe

Description: This study was concerned with the physics of the propagation of a tone burst of high frequency sound in a steel water-filled pipe. The choice of the pulse was rather arbitrary, so that this work in no way can be considered as recommending a particular pulse form. However, the MATLAB computer codes developed in this study are general enough to carry out studies of pulses of various forms. Also, it should be pointed out that the codes as written are quite time consuming. A computation of the complete field, including all 5995 modes, requires several hours on a desktop computer. The time required by such computations as these is a direct consequence of the bandwidths, frequencies and sample rates employed. No attempt was made to optimize these codes, and it is assumed that much can be done in this regard.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Sullivan, E. J. & Candy, J. V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Investigate Methods to Decrease Compilation Time-AX-Program Code Group Computer Science R& D Project

Description: Large simulation codes can take on the order of hours to compile from scratch. In Kull, which uses generic programming techniques, a significant portion of the time is spent generating and compiling template instantiations. I would like to investigate methods that would decrease the overall compilation time for large codes. These would be methods which could then be applied, hopefully, as standard practice to any large code. Success is measured by the overall decrease in wall clock time a developer spends waiting for an executable. Analyzing the make system of a slow to build project can benefit all developers on the project. Taking the time to analyze the number of processors used over the life of the build and restructuring the system to maximize the parallelization can significantly reduce build times. Distributing the build across multiple machines with the same configuration can increase the number of available processors for building and can help evenly balance the load. Becoming familiar with compiler options can have its benefits as well. The time improvements of the sum can be significant. Initial compilation time for Kull on OSF1 was {approx} 3 hours. Final time on OSF1 after completion is 16 minutes. Initial compilation time for Kull on AIX was {approx} 2 hours. Final time on AIX after completion is 25 minutes. Developers now spend 3 hours less waiting for a Kull executable on OSF1, and 2 hours less on AIX platforms. In the eyes of many Kull code developers, the project was a huge success.
Date: June 11, 2003
Creator: Cottom, T
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Advanced Simulation and Computing: A Summary Report to the Director's Review

Description: It has now been three years since the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program (ASCI), as managed by Defense and Nuclear Technologies (DNT) Directorate, has been reviewed by this Director's Review Committee (DRC). Since that time, there has been considerable progress for all components of the ASCI Program, and these developments will be highlighted in this document and in the presentations planned for June 9 and 10, 2003. There have also been some name changes. Today, the Program is called ''Advanced Simulation and Computing,'' Although it retains the familiar acronym ASCI, the initiative nature of the effort has given way to sustained services as an integral part of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP). All computing efforts at LLNL and the other two Defense Program (DP) laboratories are funded and managed under ASCI. This includes the so-called legacy codes, which remain essential tools in stockpile stewardship. The contract between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California (UC) specifies an independent appraisal of Directorate technical work and programmatic management. Such represents the work of this DNT Review Committee. Beginning this year, the Laboratory is implementing a new review system. This process was negotiated between UC, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), and the Laboratory Directors. Central to this approach are eight performance objectives that focus on key programmatic and administrative goals. Associated with each of these objectives are a number of performance measures to more clearly characterize the attainment of the objectives. Each performance measure has a lead directorate and one or more contributing directorates. Each measure has an evaluation plan and has identified expected documentation to be included in the ''Assessment File''.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: McCoy, M G & Peck, T
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Development of a Low-Dimensional Wind Turbine Inflow Turbulence Model: Second Quarterly Report; December 15, 2002--March 15, 2003

Description: For the quarterly research period 15 Dec. 2002-15 Mar. 2003, researchers at the University of Wyoming in Laramie made progress in the first two Tasks listed under PHASE I of their research effort. Individual Cases99 data sets have been chosen for the initial data analysis, and investigations are underway to assess the ability of the Penn State/National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Modeling System Version 5 (MM5) to simulate fluxes.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Naughton, J. W. & Lindberg, W. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Theoretical Aerodynamic Analyses of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines: July 11, 2002--October 31, 2002

Description: Theoretical analyses of six airfoils--the E 387, FX 63-137, S822, S834, SD2030, and SH3055--have been performed for Reynolds numbers from 0.10 x 106 to 1.00 x 106 using the Eppler Airfoil Design and Analysis Code and the XFOIL code. The results from both codes exhibit the typical Reynolds number and roughness effects. Comparisons of the results from the two codes generally show good agreement, particularly for Reynolds numbers greater than 0.10 x 106. The maximum lift coefficient predicted by the XFOIL code is about 0.2 higher, and the Reynolds number and roughness effects are larger. The magnitudes of the zero-lift angle and pitching-moment coefficients predicted by the Eppler code are greater.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Somers, D. M. & Maughmer, M. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Hanford Contaminant Distribution Coefficient Database and Users Guide

Description: This revision of PNNL-13895 is an updated version of the original document. The changes in this document include the addition of Kd data for iodide and uranium that became available during fiscal year 2003. Supplementary data are also included regarding the sediment and solution characteristic used in the studies. The original document compiles in a single source the Kd values measured with Hanford sediment for radionuclides and toxic compounds that have the greatest potential for driving risk to human health and safety in the vadose zone and groundwater at the Hanford Site.
Date: June 10, 2003
Creator: Cantrell, Kirk J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey & Last, George V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Brookhaven National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY2003-2007.

Description: This document presents the vision for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the next five years, and a roadmap for implementing that vision. Brookhaven is a multidisciplinary science-based laboratory operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), supported primarily by programs sponsored by the DOE's Office of Science. As the third-largest funding agency for science in the U.S., one of the DOE's goals is ''to advance basic research and the instruments of science that are the foundations for DOE's applied missions, a base for U.S. technology innovation, and a source of remarkable insights into our physical and biological world, and the nature of matter and energy'' (DOE Office of Science Strategic Plan, 2000 http://www.osti.gov/portfolio/science.htm). BNL shapes its vision according to this plan.
Date: June 10, 2003
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The 75As(n,2n) Cross Sections into the 74As Isomer and Ground State

Description: The {sup 75}As(n, 2n) cross section for the population of the T{sub 1/2} = 26.8-ns isomer at E{sub x} = 259.3 keV in {sup 74}As has been measured as a function of incident neutron energy, from threshold to E{sub n} = 20 MeV. The cross section was measured using the GEANIE spectrometer at LANSCE/WNR. For convenience, the {sup 75}As(n, 2n) population cross section for the {sup 74}As ground state has been deduced as the difference between the previously-known (n, 2n) reaction cross section and the newly measured {sup 75}As(n, 2n){sup 74}As{sup m} cross section. The (n, 2n) reaction, ground-state, and isomer population cross sections are tabulated in this paper.
Date: June 30, 2003
Creator: Younes, W; Garrett, P E; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Ormand, W E; Dietrich, F S et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Existing Evidence for the Fate of Neptunium in the Yucca Mountain Repository

Description: Neptunium, because of its long half life, is an element of long-term interest to the Yucca Mountain repository. The fate of neptunium under repository settings is unknown. This report provides a review and new interpretation of past tests on commercial spent nuclear fuel and experimental evidence on the fate of neptunium. Tests on commercial spent nuclear fuel preformed previously at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) used a bathtub setup by immersing spent fuel in either deionized water or a groundwater typical of those at Yucca Mountain. The main goal of the tests was to determine the different concentrations of radionuclides in solution with different types of cladding defects. Neptunium was not the focus of these tests, nor were the tests designed to study neptunium. Drip tests performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are unsaturated tests that drip water at different rates on spent fuel. Relatively new tests at ANL examine the corrosion of Np-doped U3O8 in humid air at various temperatures. This review concludes that all tests reported here have analytical problems (i.e., relatively high detection limits for Np) and have been configured such that they limit the ability to interpret the available neptunium data. Past tests on spent nuclear fuel do not unambiguously describe neptunium chemistry as there are multiple mechanisms that may explain the observed behavior in each test. One apparently major shortcoming of most tests is that the extent of fuel reaction was limited by the amount of oxygen present in the system. Further detailed studies under repository-relevant conditions, which include the assumption of a constant 20 percent oxygen atmosphere, are needed to provide the data necessary for the development and validation of models used to predict the long-term fate of neptunium and other radionuclides at Yucca Mountain.
Date: June 18, 2003
Creator: Friese, Judah I. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Buck, Edgar C. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); McNamara, Bruce K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Hanson, Brady D. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) & Marschman, Steven C. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Sets of Reports and Articles Regarding Cement Wastes Forms Containing Alpha Emitters that are Potentially Useful for Development of Russian Federation Waste Treatment Processes for Solidification of Weapons Plutonium MOX Fuel Fabrication Wastes for

Description: This is a set of nine reports and articles that were kindly provided by Dr. Christine A. Langton from the Savannah River Site (SRS) to L. J. Jardine LLNL in June 2003. The reports discuss cement waste forms and primarily focus on gas generation in cement waste forms from alpha particle decays. However other items such as various cement compositions, cement product performance test results and some cement process parameters are also included. This set of documents was put into this Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) releasable report for the sole purpose to provide a set of documents to Russian technical experts now beginning to study cement waste treatment processes for wastes from an excess weapons plutonium MOX fuel fabrication facility. The intent is to provide these reports for use at a US RF Experts Technical Meeting on: the Management of Wastes from MOX Fuel Fabrication Facilities, in Moscow July 9-11, 2003. The Russian experts should find these reports to be very useful for their technical and economic feasibility studies and the supporting R&D activities required to develop acceptable waste treatment processes for use in Russia as part of the ongoing Joint US RF Plutonium Disposition Activities.
Date: June 12, 2003
Creator: Jardine, L J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Flame Arrester Evaluation for E-Diesel Fuel Tanks: September 3, 2002 - May 28, 2003

Description: An evaluation of various flame arresters for use with E-Diesel fuel was conducted on four diesel fuel tanks selected to represent typical fuel tank and fill neck designs. Multiple flame arresters were tested on each fuel tank.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Weyandt, N. & Janssens, M. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Estimating the Deformability and Strength of Rock Masses - In-Situ Tests, and Related Procedures

Description: This report was prepared for presentation at the STRATCOM Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (ACTD) meeting held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, May 21, 2003. It discusses the methods that can be used to estimate the mechanical properties of rock masses, such as deformability and strength. Special emphasis is put on the fact that rock mass properties are subject to an effect of scale, i.e. the properties measured on laboratory-scale samples are not representative of in-situ properties because of the presence of geologic discontinuities. This information is relevant to the planning of new field tests to assess the effects of explosions in the ground that are part of the on-going ACTD.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Heuze, F E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A Compendium of Transfer Factors for Agricultural and Animal Products

Description: Transfer factors are used in radiological risk assessments to estimate the amount of radioactivity that could be present in a food crop or organism based on the calculated concentration in the source medium (i.e., soil or animal feed). By calculating the concentration in the food, the total intake can be estimated and a dose calculated as a result of the annual intake. This report compiles transfer factors for radiological risk assessments, using common food products, including meats, eggs, and plants. Transfer factors used were most often selected from recommended values listed by national or international organizations for use in radiological food chain transport calculations. Several methods of estimation and extrapolation were used for radionuclides not listed in the primary information sources. Tables of transfer factors are listed by element and information source for beef, eggs, fish, fruit, grain, leafy vegetation, milk, poultry, and root vegetables.
Date: June 2, 2003
Creator: Staven, Lissa H.; Napier, Bruce A.; Rhoads, Kathleen & Strenge, Dennis L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Analysis of NREL Cold-Drink Vending Machines for Energy Savings

Description: NREL Staff, as part of Sustainable NREL, an initiative to improve the overall energy and environmental performance of the lab, decided to control how its vending machines used energy. The cold-drink vending machines across the lab were analyzed for potential energy savings opportunities. This report gives the monitoring and the analysis of two energy conservation measures applied to the cold-drink vending machines at NREL.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.; Bottom, K. & Ault, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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John Day Tailrace MASS2 Hydraulic Modeling

Description: Recent biological results for the Juvenile Bypass System at John Jay Lock and Dam have raised concerns about the hydraulic conditions that are created in the tailrace under different project operations. This Memorandum for Record discusses the development and application of a truncated MASS2 model in the John Day tailrace.
Date: June 3, 2003
Creator: Rakowski, Cynthia L. & Richmond, Marshall C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Reconnection in NIMROD: Model, Predictions, Remedies

Description: It is shown that in NIMROD the formation of closed current configurations, occurring only after the voltage is turned off, is due to the faster resistive decay of nonsymmetric modes compared to the symmetric projection of the 3D steady state achieved by gun injection. Implementing Spitzer resistivity is required to make a definitive comparison with experiment, using two experimental signatures of the model discussed in the paper. If there are serious disagreements, it is suggested that a phenomenological hyper-resistivity be added to the n = 0 component of Ohm's law, similar to hyper-resistive Corsica models that appear to fit experiments. Hyper-resistivity might capture physics at small scale missed by NIMROD. Encouraging results would motivate coupling NIMROD to SPICE with edge physics inspired by UEDGE, as a tool for experimental data analysis.
Date: June 25, 2003
Creator: Fowler, T K; Bulmer, R H; Cohen, B I & Hau, D D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Users Manual for TART 2002: A Coupled Neutron-Photon 3-D, Combinatorial Geometry Time Dependent Monte Carlo Transport Code

Description: TART 2002 is a coupled neutron-photon, 3 Dimensional, combinatorial geometry, time dependent Monte Carlo radiation transport code. This code can run on any modern computer. It is a complete system to assist you with input preparation, running Monte Carlo calculations, and analysis of output results. TART 2002 is also incredibly FAST; if you have used similar codes, you will be amazed at how fast this code is compared to other similar codes. Use of the entire system can save you a great deal of time and energy. TART 2002 is distributed on CD. This CD contains on-line documentation for all codes included in the system, the codes configured to run on a variety of computers, and many example problems that you can use to familiarize yourself with the system. TART 2002 completely supersedes all older versions of TART, and it is strongly recommended that users only use the most recent version of TART 2002 and its data files.
Date: June 6, 2003
Creator: Cullen, D E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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High-Efficiency Steam Electrolyzer

Description: A hydrogen economy will require readily available and affordable hydrogen fuel. Current methods of hydrogen production do not fulfill these requirements. We are working on an electrolyzer system that can provide distributed hydrogen production while taking advantage of the nation's existing natural gas infrastructure. Electrolysis is a promising hydrogen production technology both because of its ability to produce pure hydrogen from water and because it does not require large, centralized plants. Unlike other technologies, the cost of hydrogen production scales well from larger to smaller systems. Electrolysis units could be widely distributed and scaled to meet the hydrogen requirements of different users such as individual households, local fueling stations and industrial facilities. A significant drawback to traditional electrolysis is the large electricity consumption required to convert water to hydrogen and oxygen. The electricity requirements mean such systems are expensive to operate. In addition, if the electricity is provided from coal or gas-fired power plants, electrolytic hydrogen production does not mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. The concept described in this report is intended to resolve some of the problems associated with electrolytic hydrogen production. By utilizing natural gas in place of air in the anode compartment in a solid oxide electrolyzer, the electricity requirements of the system are greatly reduced. The system has the capability to produce pure hydrogen, or hydrogen humidified to levels appropriate for direct use in a PEM fuel cell. With inherent electrochemical compression, the requirement for external compression for pressurization could be reduced. This technology offers numerous advantages for distributed hydrogen production of stationary and transportation hydrogen fuel cells. Our preliminary calculations indicate that using this concept, hydrogen could be produced at a cost competitive with gasoline (on a per gallon equivalent basis) while also lowering carbon dioxide emissions.
Date: June 30, 2003
Creator: Vance, A L; Trent, J W; See, E F & Glass, R S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Analysis of CASES-99 Lidar and Turbulence Data in Support of Wind Turbine Effects: April 1, 2001 to Januay 31, 2003

Description: The nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) of the Great Plains of the central United States has been identified as a promising source of high-momentum wind flow for wind energy. The acceleration of the winds after sunset above the surface produces a jet profile in the wind velocity, with maximum speeds that often exceed 10 m s-1 or more at heights near 100 m or more. These high wind speeds are advantageous for wind energy generation. The high speeds aloft, however, also produce a region of high shear between the LLJ and the earth's surface, where the nocturnal flow is often calm or nearly so. This shear zone below the LLJ generates atmospheric waves and turbulence that can cause strong vibration in the turbine rotors. It has been suggested that these vibrations contribute to premature failures in large wind turbines, which, of course, would be a considerable disadvantage for wind energy applications. In October 1999, a field project called the Cooperative Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Study 1999 campaign, or CASES-99, was conducted in southeastern Kansas to study the nocturnal stable boundary layer. One of the instruments deployed during CASES-99 was the High-Resolution Doppler Lidar, a new scanning, remote-sensing, wind-mapping instrument.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Banta, R. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Blanket Biological Review for General Maintenance Activities Within Active Burial Grounds, 200 E and 200 W Areas, ECR No. 2002-200-034

Description: No plant and animal species protected under the ESA, candidates for such protection, or species listed by the Washington state government were observed in the vicinity of the proposed sites. Piper's daisy may still occur in some of the burial grounds. This is a Washington State Sensitive plant species, and as such is a Level III resource under the Hanford Site Biological Resources Management Plan. Compensatory mitigation is appropriate for this species when adverse impacts cannot be avoided. The Ecological Compliance Assessment Project (ECAP) staff should consulted prior to the initiation of major work activities within areas where this species has been identified (218-E-12, 218-E-10). The stalked-pod and crouching milkvetch are relatively common throughout 200 West area, therefore even if the few individuals within the active burial grounds are disturbed, it is not likely that the overall local population will be adversely affected. The Watch List is the lowest level of listing for pl ant species of concern in the State of Washington. No adverse impacts to species or habitats of concern are expected to occur from routine maintenance within the active portions of the 218-W-4C, 218-W-4B, 218-W-3, 218-W-3A, and 218-W-5 burial grounds, as well as the portion of 218-E-12B currently used for storage of retired submarine reactor cores. The remaining portions of the 218-E-12B burial ground, the entire 218-E-10 burial ground, and the 218-W-6 burial ground currently have extensive vegetative cover and it is highly likely that migratory birds, such as meadow larks, horned larks, and curlews will nest in these areas. Therefore, it is recommended that if removal of the existing vegetation is required for burial ground operations, such removal only occur during the August through March time period (i.e. when the birds are not actively nesting). This blanket review does not apply to the portions of 218-W-4C, …
Date: June 26, 2003
Creator: Sackschewsky, Michael R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Tolerance of Three-Stage CIGS Deposition to Variations Imposed by Roll-to-Roll Processing: Phase I Annual Report, May 2002--May 2003

Description: Global Solar Energy, Inc. (GSE) and subcontractor ITN Energy Systems, Inc. (ITN) are addressing process tolerance issues in this program. The definition and resolution of process tolerance issues satisfy many of the goals of the Thin Film Photovoltaics Partnership Program (TFPPP). First, the investigation is likely to identify acceptable ranges for critical deposition parameters. This will have the benefit of providing upper and lower control limits for in-situ process-monitoring components, thus increasing average efficiency, as well as yield of product. Second, the exploration may uncover insensitivities to some processing procedures, allowing manufacture of modules at increased throughput and decreased cost. The exploration allows a quantitative evaluation of the trade-offs between performance, throughput, and costs. Third, the proposed program also satifies the TFPPP goal of establishing a wider research and development base for higher-efficiency processing. Fourth, the acquisition of data defining sensitivity to processing has important implications for the required accuracy of process sensors and control. Finally, the program helps the photovoltaic community advance toward a better understanding of CIGS growth, which is a longer-term goal of the TFPPP.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Beck, M. E. & Repins, I. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-103. Examination Completed April 2003.

Description: COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-103. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report(s)that describes the results of the COGEMA ultrasonic examinations.
Date: June 30, 2003
Creator: Pardini, Allan F. & Posakony, Gerald J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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NERI Final Project Report: On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring System for Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants

Description: This project provides a proof-of-principle technology demonstration for SDMS, where a distributed suite of sensors is integrated with active components and passive structures of types expected to be encountered in next generation nuclear power reactor and plant systems. The project employs state-of-the-art operational sensors, advanced stressor-based instrumentation, distributed computing, RF data network modules and signal processing to improve the monitoring and assessment of the power reactor system and gives data that is used to provide prognostics capabilities.
Date: June 20, 2003
Creator: Bond, Leonard J.; Jarrell, Donald B.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Meador, Richard J.; Sisk, Daniel R.; Hatley, Darrel D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Numerically Simulating the Hydrodynamic and Water Quality Environment for Migrating Salmon in the Lower Snake River

Description: Summer temperatures in the Lower Snake River can be altered by releasing cold waters that originate from deep depths within Dworshak Reservoir. These cold releases are used to lower temperatures in the Clearwater and Lower Snake Rivers, and improve hydrodynamic and water quality conditions for migrating aquatic species. This project monitored the complex three-dimensional hydrodynamic and thermal conditions at the confluence of the Clearwater and Snake Rivers and the processes that led to stratification of Lower Granite Reservoir (LGR) during the late spring, summer, and fall of 2002. Hydrodynamic, water quality, and meteorological conditions around the reservoir were monitored at frequent intervals, and this effort is currently continuing in 2003. Monitoring of the reservoir is a multi-year endeavor, and this report spans only the first year of data collection. In addition to monitoring the LGR environment, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model has also been applied. This model uses collected field data as boundary conditions and has been applied to the entire 2002 field season. Numerous data collection sites were within the model domain and serve as both calibration and validation locations for the numerical model. Errors between observed and simulated data vary in magnitude from location to location and from one time to another. Generally, errors are small and within expected ranges, although model parameters may be improved in the future to minimize differences between observed and simulated values as additional 2003 field data become available. A two-dimensional laterally-averaged hydrodynamic and water quality model was applied to the three reservoirs downstream of LGR (the pools behind Little Goose, Lower Monumental, and Ice Harbor Dams). A two-dimensional model is appropriate for these reservoirs because observed lateral thermal variations during summer and fall 2002 were almost negligible, however vertical thermal variations were quite large (see USACE 2003). The numerical model …
Date: June 10, 2003
Creator: Cook, Chris B.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Coleman, Andre M.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Titzler, P. Scott & Bleich, Matthew D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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