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Adaptive dimension reduction for clustering high dimensional data

Description: It is well-known that for high dimensional data clustering, standard algorithms such as EM and the K-means are often trapped in local minimum. many initialization methods were proposed to tackle this problem, but with only limited success. In this paper they propose a new approach to resolve this problem by repeated dimension reductions such that K-means or EM are performed only in very low dimensions. Cluster membership is utilized as a bridge between the reduced dimensional sub-space and the original space, providing flexibility and ease of implementation. Clustering analysis performed on highly overlapped Gaussians, DNA gene expression profiles and internet newsgroups demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Ding, Chris; He, Xiaofeng; Zha, Hongyuan & Simon, Horst
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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ADVANCED GASIFICATION-BASED FUEL CONVERSION AND ELECTRIC ENERGY PRODUCTION SYSTEM

Description: Boise Paper Solutions and the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) are cooperating to develop, demonstrate and place in continuous operation an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system suitable for near-term commercial deployment in the Forest Products Industry. The system will be used in conjunction with, rather than in place of, existing wood waste fired boilers and flue gas cleanup systems. The novel system will include three advanced technological components based on GTI's RENUGAS{reg_sign} and three-stage stoker combustion technologies, and a gas turbine-based power generation concept developed in DOE's High Performance Power System (HIPPS) program. The system has, as its objective, to avoid the major hurdles of high-pressure gasification, i.e., high-pressure fuel feeding and ash removal, and hot gas cleaning that are typical for conventional IGCC power generation. It aims to also minimize capital intensity and technology risks. The system is intended to meet the immediate needs of the forest products industry for highly efficient and environmentally friendly electricity and steam generation systems utilizing existing wood waste as fuel resources. The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate the commercial applicability of an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system at Boise Paper Solutions' pulp and paper mill located at DeRidder, Louisiana.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Rabovitser, Joseph & Bryan, Bruce
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Advanced Stripper Gas Produced Water Remediation, Quarterly Technical Report: July-September 2002

Description: Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program is intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal …
Date: October 2002
Creator: Bonner, Harry & Malmquist, Roger
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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ALEGRA: User Input and Physics Descriptions Version 4.2

Description: ALEGRA is an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element code that emphasizes large distortion and shock propagation. This document describes the user input language for the code.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: BOUCHERON, EDWARD A.; BROWN, KEVIN H.; BUDGE, KENT G.; BURNS, SHAWN P.; CARROLL, DANIEL E.; CARROLL, SUSAN et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Annual Technical Status Report of the Regulatory Assistance Project: September 2000--September 2001

Description: This report summarizes the work in 2001 by the Regulatory Assistance Project (RAP), under contract to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This work focused on identifying and removing the regulatory and institutional barriers that keep the full economic value of distributed resources from being realized. The following five reports present the work details: (1) Accommodating Distributed Resources in Wholesale Markets, NREL/SR-560-32497; (2) Distributed Resource Distribution Credit Pilot Programs - Revealing the Value to Consumers and Vendors, NREL/SR-560-32499; (3) Distributed Resources and Electric System Reliability, NREL/SR-560-32498; (4) Distribution System Cost Methodologies for Distributed Generation, NREL/SR-560-32500; (5) Distribution System Cost Methodologies for Distributed Generation Appendices, NREL/SR. Visit www.eren.doe.gov/distributedpower for more information about RAP contract activity to establish environmental output air emissions standards for small-scale electricity generation (to be published as a future NREL subcontract report).
Date: October 1, 2002
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Apollo(R) Thin Film Process Development: Final Technical Report, April 1998 - April 2002

Description: BP Solar first started investigative work on CdTe photovoltaics in 1986. The module product name chosen for the CdTe devices is Apollo. The deposition method chosen was electrochemical deposition due to its simplicity and good control of stoichiometric composition. The window layer used is CdS, produced from a chemical-bath deposition. Initial work focused on increasing photovoltaic cell size from a few mm2 to 900 cm2. At BP Solar's Fairfield plant, work is focused on increasing semiconductor deposition to 1 m2. The primary objective of this subcontract is to establish the conditions required for the efficient plating of CdS/CdTe on large-area, transparent conducting tin-oxide-coated glass superstrate. The initial phase concentrates on superstrate sizes up to 0.55 m2. Later phases will include work on 0.94 m2 superstrates. The tasks in this subcontract have been split into four main categories: (1) CdS and CdTe film studies; (2) Enhanced laser processing; (3) Outdoor testing program for the Apollo module; and (4) Production waste abatement and closed loop study.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Cunningham, D. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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An Approach to Wireless Communications at Sandia National Laboratories

Description: Wireless communication plays an increasing role in military, industrial, public safety, and academic computer networks. Although in general, radio transmitters are not currently permitted in secured areas at Sandia, wireless communications would open new opportunities, allowing mobile and pervasive user access. Without wireless communications, we must live in a ''non-mainstream'' world of fixed, wired networks, where it becomes ever more difficult to attract and retain the best professionals. This report provides a review of the current state of wireless communications, which direction wireless technology is heading, and where wireless technology could be employed at Sandia. A list of recommendations on harnessing the power of wireless communications is provided to aid in building a state-of-the-art communication environment for the 21st century at Sandia.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: WITZKE, EDWARD L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Appropriations for FY2003: Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies

Description: Appropriations are one part of a complex federal budget process that includes budget resolutions, appropriations (regular, supplemental, and continuing) bills, rescissions, and budget reconciliation bills. This report is a guide to one of the 13 regular appropriations bills that Congress passes each year. It is designed to supplement information provided by the House and Senate Commerce, Justice, State Appropriations Subcommittees.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Epstein, Susan B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Associations of Indoor Carbon Dioxide Concentrations, VOCS, Environmental Susceptibilities With Mucous Membrane and Lower Respiratory Sick Building Syndrome Symptoms in the Base Study: Analyses of the 100 Building Dataset

Description: Using the 100 office-building Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study dataset, we performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the associations between indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} (dCO{sub 2}) concentrations and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (Lresp) Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Using principal components analysis we identified a number of possible sources of 73 measured volatile organic compounds in the office buildings, and assessed the impact of these VOCs on the probability of presenting the SBS symptoms. Additionally we included analysis adjusting for the risks for predisposition of having SBS symptoms associated with the allergic, asthmatic, and environmentally sensitive subpopulations within the office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependant associations (p<0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100-ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average significantly reduce the prevalence of several SBS symptoms, up to 80%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. VOC sources were observed to play an role in direct association with mucous membrane and lower respiratory irritation, and possibly to be indirectly involved in indoor chemical reactions with ozone that produce irritating compounds associated with SBS symptoms. O-xylene, possibly emitted from furniture coatings was associated with shortness of breath (OR at the maximum concentration = 8, p < 0.05). The environmental sensitivities of a large subset of the office building population add to the overall risk of SBS symptoms (ORs ranging from 2 to above 11) within the buildings.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Apte, M. G. & Erdmann, C. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Best Estimate Radiation Flux Value-Added Procedure: Algorithm Operational Details and Explanations

Description: This document describes some specifics of the algorithm for best estimate evaluation of radiation fluxes at Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF). It uses the data available from the three co-located surface radiometer platforms at the SGP CF to automatically determine the best estimate of the irradiance measurements available. The Best Estimate Flux (BEFlux) value-added procedure (VAP) was previously named Best Estimate ShortWave (BESW) VAP, which included all of the broadband and spectral shortwave (SW) measurements for the SGP CF. In BESW, multiple measurements of the same quantities were handled simply by designating one as the primary measurement and using all others to merely fill in any gaps. Thus, this “BESW” is better termed “most continuous,” since no additional quality assessment was applied. We modified the algorithm in BESW to use the average of the closest two measurements as the best estimate when possible, if these measurements pass all quality assessment criteria. Furthermore, we included longwave (LW) fields in the best estimate evaluation to include all major components of the surface radiative energy budget, and renamed the VAP to Best Estimate Flux (BEFLUX1LONG).
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Shi, Y. & Long, C. N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Better Understanding Public Perceptions of Risk: Possible Implications for Long-term Environmental Stewardship and Hazardous Waste Management

Description: In the treatment, disposition, and long-term stewardship (e.g., storage) of hazardous waste forms, questions that are of particular concern are: • What is technically feasible and safe, • What is economically affordable, • What is legally mandated and allowable, and • What is publicly acceptable? Although DOE is exerting considerable effort in making sound science-based decisions that are economical and meet legal requirements, it may be lapse in not gaining a better understanding of how public perceptions are formed. This observation appears especially true in regards to the perceived long-term integrity and safety of various proposed hazardous waste storage options. The purpose of this research was to investigate how differences in how hazardous materials are configured and how those configurations are presented affect peoples’ perceptions of how safe they are. Specifically, we designed a preliminary experiment that assessed the public’s perception of risk for various storage configurations of hazardous materials. We included into the design factors to measure participants’ deliberative and spontaneous response to the perceived safety (or danger) posed by different hazardous materials storage configurations. The critical objectives of the proposed effort were to identify specific characteristics of hazardous materials storage configuration and to identify possible differences in deliberative and spontaneous processing of those specific characteristics. Identification of these objectives is critical in understanding what does and does not constitute an acceptable approach to hazardous waste treatment, disposition, and long-term storage. FY01 TECHNICAL OBJECTIVES • Develop an experimental process for collecting perceptions regarding the perceived safety and long-term integrity of hazardous waste storage systems. • Develop a computer-based, reusable collection instrument “system” with associated graphical images. • Validate the applicability and value of the developed methodology by conducting an on-site experiment. • Submit results for publication in an applicable, peer-reviewed scientific journal. • Propose follow-on work and funding requests …
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Joe, Jeffrey Clark & Harbour, Gerald Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Blade Manufacturing Improvement Project: Final Report

Description: The Blade Manufacturing Improvement Project explores new, unique and improved materials integrated with innovative manufacturing techniques that promise substantial economic enhancements for the fabrication of wind turbine blades. The primary objectives promote the development of advanced wind turbine blade manufacturing in ways that lower blade costs, cut rotor weight, reduce turbine maintenance costs, improve overall turbine quality and increase ongoing production reliability. Foam Matrix (FMI) has developed a wind turbine blade with an engineered foam core, incorporating advanced composite materials and using Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) processes to form a monolithic blade structure incorporating a single molding tool. Patented techniques are employed to increase blade load bearing capability and insure the uniform quality of the manufactured blade. In production quantities, FMI manufacturing innovations may return a sizable per blade cost reduction when compared to the cost of producing comparable blades with conventional methods.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: SHERWOOD, KENT
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Breakthrough in precision (0.3 percent) of neutron activation analyses applied to provenience studies of obsidian

Description: A gamma ray spectrometer at LBNL (the Luis W. Alvarez Iridium Coincidence Spectrometer), that was specifically designed for high sensitivity measurements of iridium abundances, has been significantly modified in order to provide precisions of measurement in neutron activation analysis of obsidian significantly better than previously obtained (about 1%). Repeated measurements on a single sample of obsidian from a deposit near Chivay, Arequipa, Peru, showed a precision (average coefficient of variation) of 0.19% for the 6 best-measured elements, the value anticipated from the known random errors of measurement. In measurement of samples made from 7 different obsidian nodules from two locations near Chivay, a group of 5 had a spread of 0.30% for the 6 elements measured with counting statistics of better than 0.3% (and 1.8% for the remaining 6 elements). The data suggest there are source inhomogeneity and/or sample preparation contamination errors totaling 0.24 {+-} .05% for the 6 best measured elements. A sixth obsidian sample could be distinguished from the main group because it differed by +0.8% for most elements, and the last sample could be easily distinguished because several elements differed by more than 1%. The precision of measurements now being developed may provide a significantly more precise determination of the provenience of obsidian artifacts than has been heretofore possible. Also the techniques of measurement developed for obsidian will provide even better precisions with pottery, as many elements are more abundant in pottery than in obsidian.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Asaro, Frank; Stross, Fred H. & Burger, Richard L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Building America Field Project: Results for the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), January to October 2001

Description: This report describes the various projects by the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) that were active during the first 10 months of 2001, summarizing results, benefits, lessons learned, and future plans. The second part of this report describes technical matters, summarizing innovative technologies, systems engineering and results, and industry team member contributions.
Date: October 1, 2002
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Bursting Frequency Predictions for Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers

Description: A computational method for the prediction of the bursting frequency associated with the coherent streamwise structures in high-speed compressible turbulent boundary layers is presented. The structures are described as wavelike disturbances of the turbulent mean flow. A direct resonance theory is used to determine the frequency of bursting. The resulting hydrodynamic linear stability equations are discretized by using a Chebyshev collocation method. A global numerical method capable of resolving the entire eigenvalue spectrum is used. Realistic turbulent mean velocity and temperature profiles are applied. For all of the compressible turbulent boundary layers calculated, the results show at least one frequency that satisfies the resonance condition. A second frequency can be identified for cases with high Reynolds numbers. An estimate is also made for the profile distribution of the temperature disturbance.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: LIOU, WILLIAM W. & FANG, YICHUAN
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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CALIBRATION OF SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

Description: The project, ''Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Calibration,'' is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, including several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on ''Reservoir Geophysics'' for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along ''phantom'' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to …
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Pennington, Wayne D.; Acevedo, Horacio; Green, Aaron; Haataja, Joshua; Len, Shawn; Minaeva, Anastasia et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Carbon Dioxide Capture From Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents Quarterly Technical Progress Report: July-September 2002

Description: The objective of this project is to develop a simple and inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests suggested that higher temperature calcination of trona leds to reduced carbonation activity in subsequent cycles, but that calcination in dry carbon dioxide did not result in decreased activity relative to calcination in helium. Following higher temperature calcination, sodium bicarbonate (SBC) No.3 has greater activity than either coarse or fine grades of trona. Fixed bed testing of calcined SBC No.3 at 70 C confirmed that high rates of carbon dioxide absorption are possible and that the resulting product is a mixture of Wegscheider's salt and sodium carbonate. In fluidized bed testing of supported potassium carbonate, very rapid carbonation rates were observed. Activity of the support material complicated the data analysis. A milled, spherical grade of SBC appeared to be similar in attrition and abrasion characteristics to an unmilled, less regularly shaped SBC. The calcination behavior, at 107 C, for the milled and unmilled materials was also similar.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Green, David A.; Turk, Brian S.; Portzer, Jeffrey W.; P.Gupta, Raghubir; McMichael, William J.; Liang, Ya et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A CAVITY RINGDOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

Description: Work on the Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) mercury spectrometer this past quarter concentrated on the actual detection of mercury and the beginning of flue gas interference testing. After obtaining the initial mercury signal detection was done at various pressures and concentrations. The Alexandrite laser system used for the CRD spectrometer has a narrow enough linewidth to spectrally resolve the isotopic structure of mercury. This includes both isotopic frequency shifts as well as hyperfine splittings due to a couple of the odd isotopes of mercury. Initial flue gas inteferent testing concentrated on SO{sub 2}, which is expected to cause the greatest interference with mercury detection due to its absorption of ultra-violet light in the same region as that of the mercury atomic line.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Celotex (Registered) Replacement Study

Description: The AL-R8 is the pit storage container in most widespread use at Pantex. The AL-R8 container family consists of standard 20-in.-diameter steel drums, 30 to 60 in. in height, with insulation inserts made of Celotex{reg_sign}--a fiberboard product made from processed sugar cane. Celotex is an acceptable material for inserts in many radioactive material shipping and storage containers. It is a good shock mitigator/insulator, does a fair job in fire protection (when oxygen is excluded), shielding, and criticality, and is inexpensive and easily available. However, the fiberboard absorbs water in humid environments which, when combined with chemical residues in the fiberboard, forms corrosive compounds that can shorten the life of the container and affect container contents. To protect the contents from this potentially damaging environment, the AL-R8 SI was developed to isolate the contents within a sealed stainless steel vessel inside the AL-R8. Although the SI protected the contents, corrosion studies indicated the SI lid bolts might corrode over time and surveillance showed that areas of the outer drum were still subject to corrosion. To address this potential problem, DOE/Albuquerque sponsored bolt and Celotex replacement studies. The bolt replacement study was assigned to Mason and Hanger's Pantex Facility and this Celotex Replacement Study to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Celotex Replacement Study evaluated options for replacing Celotex with a material that is chemically compatible with the AL-R8 SI container. The evaluation was limited to materials either used previously in nuclear materials shipping and storage containers or materials with known properties in a low-radiation environment. This limitation was set to ensure that the long-term aging effect on the new material is known a priori. Initial material evaluations narrowed the material choices to foam and cork. Although cork performed better than foam in some tests, cork was considered a less advantageous replacement material …
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Couture, S & Hafner, R
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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CFD Calculation of Internal Natural Convection in the Annulus between Horizontal Concentric Cylinders

Description: The objective of this heat transfer and fluid flow study is to assess the ability of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to reproduce the experimental results, numerical simulation results, and heat transfer correlation equations developed in the literature for natural convection heat transfer within the annulus of horizontal concentric cylinders. In the literature, a variety of heat transfer expressions have been developed to compute average equivalent thermal conductivities. However, the expressions have been primarily developed for very small inner and outer cylinder radii and gap-widths. In this comparative study, interest is primarily focused on large gap widths (on the order of half meter or greater) and large radius ratios. From the steady-state CFD analysis it is found that the concentric cylinder models for the larger geometries compare favorably to the results of the Kuehn and Goldstein correlations in the Rayleigh number range of about 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 8} (a range that encompasses the laminar to turbulent transition). For Rayleigh numbers greater than 10{sup 8}, both numerical simulations and experimental data (from the literature) are consistent and result in slightly lower equivalent thermal conductivities than those obtained from the Kuehn and Goldstein correlations.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Francis, N. D., Jr; Itamura, M. T.; Webb, S. W. & James, D. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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CHARACTERIZATION OF CATALYTIC COMBUSTOR TURBULENCE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VANE AND ENDWALL HEAT TRANSFER AND ENDWALL FILM COOLING

Description: Endwall heat transfer distributions taken in a large-scale low speed linear cascade facility are documented for mock catalytic and dry low NOx (DLN) combustion systems. Inlet turbulence levels range from about 1.0 percent for the mock Catalytic combustor condition to 14 percent for the mock dry low NOx combustor system. Stanton number contours are presented at both turbulence conditions for Reynolds numbers based on true chord length and exit conditions ranging from 500,000 to 2,000,000. Catalytic combustor endwall heat transfer shows the influence of the complex three-dimensional flow field, while the effects of individual vortex systems are less evident for the mock dry low NOx cases. Turbulence scales have been documented for both cases. Inlet boundary layers are relatively thin for the mock catalytic combustor case while inlet flow approximates a channel flow with high turbulence for the mock DLN combustor case. Inlet boundary layer parameters are presented across the inlet passage for the three Reynolds numbers and both the mock catalytic and DLN combustor inlet cases. Both midspan and 95 percent span pressure contours are included. This research provides a well-documented database taken across a range of Reynolds numbers and turbulence conditions for assessment of endwall heat transfer predictive capabilities.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Ames, Forrest E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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