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[Letter from M.K. Curry to Jerome K. Crossman, March 6, 1965]

Description: Letter from M.K. Curry to Jerome Crossman regarding the $20,000 check Crossman and the Dallas Citizens' Interracial Association donated. Curry is highly grateful for the large financial contribution and is interested in continuing to work with the association. In order to display his thanks, Curry plans to create a plaque honoring the association's contribution and its members and tells Crossman that the construction of the library will start soon.
Date: March 6, 1965
Creator: Curry, M.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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[Letter from Carl P. Collins to Jerome K. Crossman, March 1, 1965]

Description: Letter from Carl P. Collins to thank Jerome K. Crossman for the $20,000 check from the Dallas Citizens' Interracial Association for the funding of the Bishop College Development Campaign. The letter will also be sent to architect, Donald Kleinschmidt in order to instruct him to create a plaque. After the plaque has been made, it is planned to be placed at the newly constructed library that will be completed soon.
Date: March 1, 1965
Creator: Collins, Carl P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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Creep in model pillars. [Salt, trona, and potash ore]

Description: A study was made of the deformational behavior (creep) of pillars made from three quasi-plastic rock--salt, trona, and potash ore. The first phase of this study considers the design of a model pillar suitable for creep tests; in the second phase, six model pillars were prepared from salt from two sources, from trona, and from potash ore. The pillars in each group were subjected to a different but constant axial stress, and the axial strain was measured for 1,000 hours. An analysis of the data shows that in general the creep rate for these model pillars can be expressed by the relationship .epsilon = K/sub 1/ sigma/sub 0//sup n/, where .epsilon is the strain rate, sigma/sub 0/ is the applied stress, and K/sub 1/ and n are constants. For the rocks included in this test, n ranged from 2.4 to 3.3.
Date: March 1, 1965
Creator: Obert, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Raman Studies of Hydrido- and Deutero- Rhenium Tetracarbonyl Trimer

Description: In a previous study the trimer of rhenium tetracarbonyl was found to be diamagnetic, suggesting the presence of hydrogen in the compound. This was supported by chemical analysis, which indicated about one hydrogen per rhenium, and the compound was formulated as [Re(C0)4H] 3• Subsequently a proton resonance was observed on a broad line spectrometer. In the original work the infrared spectra were compared for the hydride and deuteride; cyclohexane solutions were used for the CO stretching region and KBr discs were used for the rest of the spectrum. Surprisingly, the spectra of the hydride and deuteride showed only minor differences, insufficient to confirm the presence of hydrogen. No evidence of a hydrogen stretching frequency was found. In the present work, the previously unobserved Raman spectra were measured for the hydride and deuteride . In the solid state ratber striking shifts were observed in the CO stretching region. Also there is some evidence for a metal-hydrogen stretching band at the rather low frequency of 1100 cm-1. In an attempt to support the interpretation of the Raman spectra more detailed infrared studies of the solid in KBr discs were made. The hope was to observe a metal-hydrogen stretching frequency and to explain the shifts in the CO stretching frequencies.
Date: March 25, 1965
Creator: Fellman, W.; Smith, J. Michael & Jones, L H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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PT-IP-759, channel caulking tests: C Reactor

Description: The graphite movement which has occurred at the various reactors has been characterized by two problems: (1) Crooked channels and (2) cracks and miscellaneous voids where pieces of blocks are missing. Of these problems, the cracks and voids have been the most serious in the case of ball drops. Alleviation of the crooked channels can sometimes be accomplished by graphite removal methods such as broaching, but unless some method is found to prevent the balls from entering cracks, the total effect of a ball drop would still be intolerable. Of the two methods of closing the cracks, a paste caulking procedure is anticipated to be less expensive than sleeving, both in terms of cost of the operation and the number of process tube channels which might be lost. If the VSR channel does not require drastic straightening or entry of large tooling, satisfactory caulking can be done without removal of the step plug. ``Poison`` chain may be considered as an alternative to caulking or sleeving for those outer VSR channels where the sole use of balls is for ``total control`` rather than ``speed of control.`` The objectives of this test are (1) to authorize the experimental crack filling of one or two of the VSR channels at C Reactor with a wet mixture of graphite and sugar, (2) to demonstrate the durability of this mixture in subsequent normal reactor operation, and (3) to demonstrate by testing (actual or simulated ball drops) and borescoping, that the channels are or are not again acceptable for use with the normal charge of balls.
Date: March 19, 1965
Creator: Cooke, J. P. & Russell, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Criticality Predictions in the Hanford Reactors

Description: The purpose of this study was to examine the general area of criticality prediction errors at the smaller (``pre-K``) reactors. Such errors evolve from a number of uncertainties which are difficult if not impossible to eliminate with present measuring and accounting techniques; the magnitude of these uncertainties in aggregate was indicated in an earlier study about 1.5 milli-k, which, at the time of the study, represented an ``inherent`` prediction error that constituted a practical limit on accuracy. Present day computer usage has improved considerably upon this. Predictions at the various Hanford reactors are made on the basis of a fundamental pile variable known as cold clean reactivity. This variable may be qualitatively defined as the ultimate reactivity of the room temperature reactor with all poisons and poisonous short-term fission products removed. The quantity CCR may be determined during operation by properly evaluating the temperature-reactivity coefficients C{sub m} and C{sub g}, or it may alternatively be determined at startup, when these effects are zero and the equation reduces to CE = R + {rho}{tau} + L + P4. The latter equation serves as the basis for the uniform calculational approach used herein.
Date: March 31, 1965
Creator: Skidmore, S. M. & Bowers, C. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Production Test IP-725, Supplement A: Increased graphite temperature limit F Reactor

Description: The objective of Production Test IP-725 was to investigate the reaction rate between graphite and carbon dioxide in F Reactor at a temperature 50 C higher than that currently permitted by Process Standards. After approval of the test, the temperature limit was increased from 650 to 700 C. After approximately three weeks of operation with the-higher temperature limit, the reactor was shut down and the graphite oxidation monitor samples which had been inserted for this test were discharged and measured. It is believed that sufficient data have row been obtained from the first phase of the test to warrant investigation at an even higher temperatures. It is therefore the objective of the supplement described in this report to raise the graphite temperature limit at F Reactor by an additional 50 C to a limit of 750 C.
Date: March 19, 1965
Creator: Russell, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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NRD target support studies weekly report No. 3

Description: This report describes the results of work done during the period from March 2 through March 8, 1965 at Hanford. Discussed topics include: pressure testing of Zr-2 tubing at high temperature, Zr-Al corrosion, and poison -- target combinations.
Date: March 11, 1965
Creator: Weber, J. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Status of plant assistance irradiations as of February 13, 1965

Description: This report covers the activities with regard to on-site customer irradiations as of February 13, 1965. The report covers the status of material undergoing irradiation, awaiting disposition, material shipped during the month, and current status of all reactor test holes.
Date: March 1, 1965
Creator: Ferguson, J. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Th-228 contamination in irradiated thoria

Description: Reactor irradiation of naturally-occurring thorium-232 produces both uranium-233 and the undesirable isotopic contaminant, uranium-232. Uranium-232 decays (74 year half-life) to thorium-228, which in turn decays with a two year half-life to a string of comparatively short-lived daughters some of which emit very highly energetic beta and gamma radiations. It is generally desirable to accumulate a substantial inventory of irradiated thoria before diverting a plant such as Purex temporarily to chemical processing of the thoria. Especially during this waiting period significant amounts of thorium-228 can be formed from decay of uranium-232, thus causing isotopic contamination of the recovered thorium-232. The purpose of this report is to show how thorium-228 builds up in thoria which has been irradiated under several different conditions and then allowed to cool for a varying period of time. The results are shown in Figures 1 through 4. Derivation of the results is described in Appendix I.
Date: March 8, 1965
Creator: Woods, W. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Chemical Processing Department Monthly Report: February 1965

Description: This report, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: production operation; purex and redox operation; finished products operation; maintenance; financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.
Date: March 22, 1965
Creator: Hanford Atomic Products Operation. Chemical Processing Department.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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