Search Results

open access

Pebble Bed Friction Factor and Thermal Expansion Tests

Description: Tests were conducted to determine the friction factor of randomly packed beds of 3/4-inch diameter spheres in 8-inch and 15-1/4-inch diameter beds, and of 1-1/2-inch diameter spheres in 15-1/4-inch diameter bed. The bed depths were varied in an attempt to isolate the effects of entrance and exit losses. The bed Reynolds number, base on sphere diameter, was varied from 5,000 to 50,000.
Date: August 31, 1960
Creator: Leeman, C. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Adsorption of Radioactive Gases on Activated Carbon

Description: The purpose of this experiment is to study the quantitative adsorption characteristics of a carbon adsorber bed receiving a radioactive inert gas in a helium stream. An objective of the experiment is to measure the equilibrium transmission of the radio-active gas through a carbon adsorber in order to determine if radio-active decay of the adsorbed gas permits additional adsorption.
Date: August 31, 1960
Creator: Madey, Richard; Barker, J. J.; Beebe, M. R. & Stephenson, T. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

High-Energy, Low-Thrust Jupiter Missions

Description: Previous studies have been made of the relationship among acceleration, specific power, payload fraction, and travel time for many interplanetary missions. These utilized tangential thrust and correspond to the high thrust Hohmann transfer orbits. In addition, a complete optimization of the one way Mars mission has been accomplished. Since the minimum Jupiter round trip time was six and a half years for tangential thrust, calculations were carried out using higher energy transfer orbits. It is shown that the orbit-matching problem cannot be solved with tangential thrust programming in this case. The initial period of acceleration away from the earth's orbit was accomplished using tangential thrust in order to minimize energy expenditure. This was followed by a period of coasting until the proper moment arrived for commencing the orbit-matching maneuver. This terminates when the velocity and spatial coordinates of Jupiter's orbit are matched. The technique used for accomplishing these various orbit matching conditions without iteration are described. Best results for the final maneuver were obtained with the thrust vector approximately normal to the velocity vector. By this technique it is shown that the round-trip Jupiter mission may be carried out in four and an half years with 16% payload and 0.10 kw/kg specific power. The acceleration is about 0.12 cm/se,. Increasing he specific power by a factor of two does not materially affect the time. Although the specific power requirement is about the same as for the Mars or Venus trips, the mission is in fact much more difficult since the required power-on-time of the power plant is increased by a factor of three. Typical values are one and half to two years.
Date: October 31, 1960
Creator: Fox, Robert H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Phase Diagrams of Zirconium-Beryllium and Related Systems

Description: Introduction. The phase diagram data reported in this paper were obtained during an investigation of the beryllium-metal compounds of the titanium group transition elements. Several compounds in these systems had been previously reported but their compositions and structures were not all known. In the course of this study many details of the phase diagrams of the system were observed. Tentative diagrams consistent with this data will be presented.
Date: May 31, 1960
Creator: Bedford, Ray Gilbert, 1928-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

State of Matter at High Pressure

Description: Abstract. The region where exact thermodynamic description of the state of matter at high pressure and high temperature is possible is located. In the remaining region various approximate theories and empirical relations are discussed. These considerations are applied to hydrogen to locate the density and pressure at which the diatomic bond collapses. Also the approximate conditions are determined at which no bound electron states exist.
Date: March 31, 1960
Creator: Alder, Berni J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

[Hanford weekly teletype report]: Supplement report for week ending June 12

Description: This document contains information about flooding of the Columbia River. It focuses attention on the following; increased elevation due to rainfall, seepage which destabilized the constructed dike, flooding of cellars, evacuation of people to emergency shelters, tug boat collision damage to power lines, and the washout of the Van Giesen Street Bridge on Yakima River.
Date: December 31, 1960
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Design of production test IP-344-A-FP, determination of the limitations of the Al-Si process

Description: Tests in which aluminum-jacketed, Al-Si bonded uranium fuel elements were baked at various temperatures have shown there is a time-temperature relationship for Al-Si layer decomposition. For heat transfer and secondary coolant barrier considerations, the extent of bonding layer deterioration during fuel element irradiation is important. Currently, Al-Si bonded fuel elements show evidence of spire bond separation, and to a lesser degree, can bond separation following irradiation. Such evidence has aroused concern for the ability of the currently produced Al-Si bonded fuel elements to withstand future reactor operating conditions. Several potential uranium fabrication and canning process improvements are being developed to further advance fuel element stability and performance. Optimization of process conditions based on these improvements may provide the necessary margin of safety for good bond layer integrity. Before a decision can be made to continue improvement of the present process or convert to a new canning process, more information on the stability of the present fuel element bond is needed. This report presents the design of a test to more fully evaluate Al-Si bond integrity under anticipated future reactor operating conditions.
Date: August 31, 1960
Creator: Hodgson, W. H. & Clinton, M. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Coolant backup design study basis and objective

Description: Preliminary studies have, in general, indicated the need for modifications and improvements to the reactor last ditch coolants systems in order to provide adequate safety of operation at power levels programmed for the future. These studies have indicated the need for improved reliability as well as increased capacity for the last ditch coolant systems. A design study is being prepared by Reactor Modification Design to define the scope of the modifications required to provide adequate last ditch systems for the older areas. Adequate last ditch cooling will be provided for the 100-K Areas under Project CGI-844 which is currently in progress. The purpose of this document is to set forth the operating conditions and objectives on which the study will be based.
Date: August 31, 1960
Creator: Schack, M. H. & Tupper, W. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Sub-Cooled Burnout Relative to Hanford Reactors

Description: In the Hanford production reactors, failure of fuel element cladding is known as subcooled burnout since the bulk coolant temperature is below the saturation temperature at time of failure or burnout of the fuel cladding. The heat generation rate at which subcooled burnout occurs, establishes a limit to allowable reactor power level. This document compares present and potential power level limits at the Hanford production reactors with power level limits established by subcooled burnout.
Date: May 31, 1960
Creator: Carlson, P. A. & Trumble, R. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Improved coolant backup 100-B, D, F, DR, H and C areas design study

Description: Preliminary engineering studies have indicated the need for modifications and improvements to the reactor coolant backup systems of the old areas in order to provide adequate safety of operation at power levels programmed for the future. These evaluations of the coolant backup systems were based on the recently adopted reactor cooling safety criteria. It was concluded that the secondary coolant systems would be adequate in capacity and reliability for the proposed future operating conditions except for certain cases of natural disaster such as earthquake damage. It was concluded that the last ditch coolant systems would be inadequate for the proposed future reactor operating conditions. The purpose of this report is to define the scope of modifications and improvements required to provide adequate last ditch systems in the old areas for future operating conditions as proposed by the Reactor Modification Program. Irradiation Processing Department, Fiscal Years 1961 through 1966. Adequate last ditch cooling will be provided for the 100-K Areas under Project CGI-844 which is currently in progress. The results of this study provide a basis for future budgeting action and project planning.
Date: October 31, 1960
Creator: Schack, M. H. & Tupper, W. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Weapons Effects for Protective Design

Description: A lecture intended to provide a general background in weapons effects is presented. Specific areas of nuclear explosion phenomena pertinent to the design of hardened systems discussed include nuclear radiation and shielding, fireball growth and effects, thermal radiation, air blast, cratering and throwout, ground shock effects, fallout, and afterwinds. (J.R.D.)
Date: March 31, 1960
Creator: Brode, H. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

MAGNETIC RECORDER FOR NUCLEAR PULSE APPLICATION. Covering Period: August 6, 1959 to October 5, 1959

Description: Direct recording of nuclear pulse height data on magnetic tape is being investigated. The characteristics of various brands of commercial tape are being investigated and a waveform analysis is being performed in an attempt to determine the most favorable frequency range for available tapes. Use of the magnetic modulator head is being investigated to minimize variations due to short term tape speed variations. (W.L.H.)
Date: October 31, 1960
Creator: Burgwald, G. M. & Stone, C. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

ISOTOPIC METHOD FOR AGE DETERMINATION OF INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS. Quarterly Progress Report, July-September 1959

Description: >The materials and methods used for the long-term nuclide pairs are essentially the same as those previously described. (April - June Report). The split planchet method was used to determine the resolving time of the tracerlab superscalar counting apparatus which is currently in use. A planchet was split in two and a sample of nuclide placed in each half and counted. From these results a formula for calculating true counting rates was evolved. Data on resolving time loss for the Superscalar are tabulated. Transmission values of Sr/ sup 89/- Ct/sup 14/ mixture were measured to determine the degree to which error in these values can be reduced by long counting periods. Data on P/sup 32/ and C/ sup 14/ tagged rubber age counts are tabulated. Also, rubber samples were prepared by adding Ca/sup 45/, Cl/sup 36/, Nb/sup 95/, and T c/sup 99/, mixing and vulcanizing and isotope pairs (Ca/sup 45/- Cl/sup 36/ and Nb/sup 99/-Tc/sup 99/) were similarly incorporated in other samples. Ground and suspended samples of these preparations were age counted. The results obtained by incorporating radioisotopes into rubber can not show close correlation between observed and calculated time. Probable reasons for errors and inconsistencies are discussed along with plans for future work. (J.R.D.)
Date: October 31, 1960
Creator: Gregson, T.C. & Waisbrot, S.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

QUARTERLY REPORT OF THE LABORATORY DIRECTOR FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1959 TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1959

Description: The third quarter of 1959 was occupied with putting the finishing touches on components of the Two-Way Model, adjusting the magnetic field to the required magnitude at all points, and life testing completed components. The present status of the model components is given including the magnet, vacuum tank, equipment for acceleration, and injector. Status of various study groups is discussed. A list of papers published, submitted for publication, and presented at meetings for the period Oct. 1958 to Oct. 1959 is given. (W.D.M.)
Date: October 31, 1960
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

An Improved Nuclear Density Gauge Progress Report: October 1959

Description: Progress is reported on development of a scintillation detector which alternately views the radiation transmitted through a sample and through a calibrated wedge. From this information density and thickness data can be obtained. Long term stability measurements are being made on the commutating system and the causes of fluctuations are being investigated. Information concerning procurement and fund expenditure are given. (J.R.D.)
Date: October 31, 1960
Creator: Burgwald, G. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

The Energy Gap in Nuclear Matter

Description: The magnitude of the energy gap in nuclear matter associated with a highly correlated ground state of the type believed to be important in the theory of superconductivity has been evaluated theoretically. The integral equation of Cooper, Mills, and Sessler is linearized and transformed into a form suitable for numerical solution. The energy gap, calculated by using an appropriate single-particle potential and the Gammel-Thaler two-body potential, is found to be a very strong function of the density of nuclear matter, and of the effective mass at the Fermi surface. It is concluded that the magnitude of the energy gap for nuclear matter should not be compared directly with experimental values for finite nuclei, although the results suggest that if the theory is extended to apply to finite nuclei it probably would be in agreement with experiment.
Date: January 31, 1960
Creator: Emery, V. J. & Sessler, A. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

METALLURGY INFORMATION MEETING, AMES LABORATORY, IOWA STATE COLLEGE, MAY 2, 3 AND 4, 1956

Description: The elevated-temperature mechanical properties of beryllium were enhanced by forming dispersed-phase alloys. The addition of properly dispersed BeO to beryllium in quantities of 2 to 3% is equivalent to lowering the testing temperature 200 deg at 1000 to 1350 deg F. Similarly dispersed intermetalic compounds such as FeBe/sub 11/ result in a threefold increase in strength at 1350 to 1650 deg F when 1.5 to 3% tron powder is blended with beryllium powder prior to fabrication. Tensile and stress-rupture properties of some of these materials are presented along with oxidation characteristics in 1650 deg F air, and corrosion behavior in 600 deg F water relative to unalloyed beryllium. (auth)
Date: October 31, 1960
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Power Cost Normalization Studies Civilian Power Reactor Program--Sept. 1, 1959

Description: In connection with the development of a comprehensive plan for a ten- year civilian power reactor program, the AEC has had a series of status reports prepared to present a comprehensive review of the technical and economic status of various nuclear power reactor concepts. In as much as the economic data reported by the various contractors reflected different design philosophies, different estimating policies, and in some cases a technology not verified by the AEC definition of current status, Sargent and Lundy was requested to review the aforementioned status reports and to prepare normalized cost estimates of each of eight reactor concepts. The reactors were studied in three plant sizes: 75, 200, and 300 Mw(e). The reactor concepts considered were pressurized water, boiling water, organic cooled, sodium graphite, liquid metal cooled, fluid fuel (aqueous homogeneous), heavy water moderated, and gas cooled. (W.D.M.)
Date: October 31, 1960
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Back to Top of Screen