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Conceptual Design of a 300-Mwe Paste-Fueled Fast Breeder Power Reactor

Description: "This report describes the conceptual design of 300 Mwe fast breeder reactor power plant that utilizes a paste-fuel system consisting of small, spherical particles settled in sodium" (p. 7). It includes a discussion of the paste-fuel system, the design of the core and blanket structure with analysis, a description of the fuel-handling system, processes for fabricating and processing the fuel, and schematics.
Date: October 1961
Creator: Blessing, W. G.; Bowers, S. D.; Hennig, R. J.; Huebotter, P. R.; Jens, W. H.; Kovacic, E. C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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UNT Libraries Assistive Technology Report 2021

Description: This report summarizes the results of a survey given to UNT Library employees on assistive technology practices. In fall 2021, the Library Accessibility Committee conducted an online survey about assistive technologies in the Libraries. The purpose of this survey was 1) to learn more about the assistive technology in the Libraries (e.g., types of technology, employee knowledge, etc.) and 2) to learn more about employee training preferences. The survey included 13 questions divided among three sections: assistive technology, training preferences, and suggestions. Sixty-seven (67) library employees responded to the survey. Results are provided in the Assistive Technology Survey Report.
Date: October 2021
Creator: Roy, Meranda M.
Partner: UNT Libraries
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Basic Gamma-Ray Data for ART Heat Deposition Calculations

Description: In order that fairly accurate thermal stress calculations can be made on the ART, it is necessary to have a reasonable picture of the temperature distribution in the reactor. To get the temperature distributions, and to determine cooling requirements in various parts of the reactor, one must know the heat deposition rates due to alpha particles, beta rays, gamma rays, and neutrons in all parts of the reactor. The present report contains only the basic physical data necessary to determine the heat deposition rates due to gamma rays. Neutron fluxes in the core and reflector regions of the ART are to be obtained from two-dimensional multigroup calculations (performed by the Curtiss-Wright Corporation). These fluxes, in conjunction with the neutron absorption cross sections, determine the neutron capture and inelastic scattering rates in the core and in the reflector. The data in this report permit the calculation of the number of gamma rays originating at various energies at every point in the core and reflector.
Date: October 3, 1956
Creator: Bertini, H. W.; Copenhaver, C. M.; Perry, A. M. & Stevenson, R. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Determination of Corrosion Products and Additives in Homogeneous Reactor Fuel III. Polarographic Determination of Iron(III)

Description: An ion-exchange -- polarographic method was developed for the determination of iron(III) in Homogeneous Reactor Fuels. Copper, which interferes, is removed from the fuel by plating it onto a cadmium coil. Iron is oxidized to iron(III) by potassium permanganate, and the iron(III) is separated from interfering metal ions by ion exchange on a Dowex 1 resin column that is in the sulfate form. The iron(III) in the effluent is determined polarographically in 0.5 M sodium citrate solution as supporting electrolyte. A fairly well defined polarographic wave is obtained for the iron(III) → iron(II) reduction at a half-wave potential of approximately -0.15 v. vs. the S.C.E. The relative standard deviation of the data for 2 µg of iron(III) per ml of solution in the polarographic cell was 6.5%; for 10 µg of iron(III) per ml it was 0.6%.
Date: October 24, 1955
Creator: Horton, A. D.; Thomason, P. F. & Raaen, H. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Homogeneous Reactor Project Quarterly Progress Report for Period Ending July 31, 1955

Description: Construction of the HRT reactor shield tank was completed, and the inside surfaces were painted. The roof structure for the tank is being assembled in preparation for an acceptance pressure test. Service piping and instrument lines are being installed in the central room area by ORNL craft forces. This work is approximately 50% complete. Fabrication of all temperature system components, except the blanket outer storage tanks, has been completed.
Date: October 10, 1955
Creator: McDuffie, H. F. & Kelly, D. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Aqueous Uranium Slurry Studies

Description: A summary of the laboratory development program on aqueous uranium slurry fuels for the Homogenous Reactor Project during the period April 1951 through March 1953 is presented. These investigations were devoted primarily to a study of the uranium oxides in aqueous suspensions. It was concluded that U(VI) was most likely to be the stable valence state in such slurry fuels and it was shown that β-UO3·H2O platelet crystals were the stable modification at 250°C. Very pure slurries of β-UO3·H2O platelets, uranium concentration of 250g/liter and average particle size of about 10 μ, had favorable settling rates and could be easily redispersed. Their viscosity and corrosion rate in stainless steel were comparable with those in water. Exposure of these slurries to pile radiation disclosed that radiolytic hydrogen and oxygen gas pressure comparable in magnitude to those of uncatalyzed uranyl sulfate solutions could be expected. Fission products in the irradiated slurries were predominantly associated with the solids. Radiation also tended to promote caking of these solids on the walls of the radiation bombs. Uranyl phosphate and the magnesium uranates were briefly investigated as alternate system but were not found satisfactory. The program was discontinued before the feasibility of uranium slurries for reactor fuels could be definitely established.
Date: October 20, 1955
Creator: Blomeke, J. O.; Bamberg, J. L.; Blomeke, J. O.; Bruce, F. R.; Fulmer, J. M.; McBride, J. P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A Fused Salt—Fluoride Volatility Process for Recovery and Decontamination of Uranium

Description: A preliminary chemical flowsheet is presented of a fluoride volatility process for recovering and decontaminating uranium from heterogeneous reactor fuels after dissolution in a fused salt. In laboratory work, a gross β decontamination factor of > 10 4 was obtained in the fluorination of a UF4-NaF-ZrF4 melt by passing the product UF6 through NaF at 650°C. The solubility of UF6 in molten NaF-ZrF4 was shown in kinetic studies to cause a lag in the evolution of UF6 from the fluorinator. Corrosion of nickel in the fluorination step appeared to be 2-4 mils/hr during the time that uranium was present. The average corrosion rate over the process as a whole was less than O.4 mil/hr. Earlier studies were reported in ORNL-1709 and 1877.
Date: October 10, 1955
Creator: Cathers, G. I. & Bennett, M. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Dissolution of Metals in Fused Fluorides

Description: In scouting tests, a number of metals used in nuclear reactor fuel elements were dissolved by 44.5-48.5-7.0 mole % ZrF4-KF-NaF fused salt at 675°C through which HF was being passed. These included type 304 stainless steel at 4 mils/hr; type 347Nb stainless steel at 7 mils/hr; thorium at 14 mils/hr; nonirradiated uranium at 17 mils/hr; zirconium at 22-35 mils/hr; titanium at 31 mils/hr; and Zircaloy-2 at 22-46 mils/hr. Only small amounts of volatile fission products formed when irradiated uranium was dissolved. Variables that appear to affect the dissolution rate are the composition of the fused fluoride, the fused fluoride temperature, the HF flow rate, the metallurgical characteristics of the material being dissolved, and the presence of other metals. The low dissolution rate of 0.001 mil/hr observed for nickel suggests that it may be suitable as a material of construction for reaction vessels.
Date: October 12, 1953
Creator: Leuze, R. E.; Cathers, G. I. & Schilling, C. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Combination of Hydrogen and Oxygen in Platinum Catalyzed Flow Reactions

Description: An extension of the concepts advanced by Langmuir regarding the nature of the platinum catalyzed oxidation of hydrogen and the application of the resulting theory to the experimental data observed by Ranschoff and Spiewak for an HRE type recombiner indicates that their data are corrected by the dimensionless equation (see report) equally well, with a mean deviation of 3.8 percent. This expression is recommended as a basis for the design of catalytic recombiners. The catalytic combinations is pictured as consisting of two surface chemical mechanisms, one of which is oxygen diffusion controlled, the other hydrogen diffusion regulated, the mechanism "change-over" occurring at that point in the recombiner where the components are arriving at the catalyst surface by diffusion in stoichiometric proportions. The catalyst volume requirements for three two portions of the bed are shown to be (see report). The hydrogen mole fraction at the mechanism "change-over" point is (see report). And the relationship between the two mass transfer coefficients is (see report). Methods for evaluating the necessary transport properties of the ternary system steam-hydrogen-oxygen for carrying out design calculations are summarized, and the new significant parameters are tabulated and plotted to facilitate these calculations. The question of non-uniform velocity profiles in packed bed flow systems, as it applied to the recombiner problem, is considered, and it is indicated that small scale test data may be used directly as a basis for designing larger units. Finally, some of the questionable aspects of the analysis of the problem are reviewed, and further experiments that should be performed to settle the doubtful point are suggested.
Date: October 26, 1954
Creator: Garber, Harold J. & Peebles, Fred N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Research Reactor Safeguard Report

Description: This memorandum sets forth a recommended uniform basis for designing the ORN shield.This includes design values for power level and emergent radiation, standards values for various material properties, and basic radiation intensities.
Date: October 7, 1954
Creator: Binford, F. T.; Cole, T. E. & Gill, J.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Research Reactor Safeguard Report

Description: The proposed ORNL Research Reactor is designed to serve as a general purpose research tool delivering a maximum thermal flux of 8x10^13 n/cm2-sec at the initial power level of five megawatts. Operation at power levels up to ten megawatts is proposed for such items as sufficient cooling capacity is available to handle the increased heat load. The reactor will use MTR-type fuel elements and beryllium reflector pieces in a 7 x 9 grid with moderation and cooling provided by forced circulation of demineralized water. The reactor tanks are submerged in a barytes concrete pool, filled with water, which serves as a biological shield. Experimental facilities include two 18" diameter "Engineering Test Facilities" and six 6" diameter beam holes. In addition, access to the core is available through the water of the pool. The result on the surrounding population of release to the atmosphere of a large fraction of the radioactive material in the core has been computed by two methods. It is shown that under certain conditions off-area personnel could be subjected to greater than the maximum permissible exposure. An analysis of the maximum hazard caused by the release of the entire contents of the core to the local watershed indicates that the resulting incident could be quite serious, but with proper monitoring and supervision would probably not constitute a lethal hazard. The probability of the occurrence of a catastrophic release of activity of sufficient magnitude to cause widespread hazard to life is quite small and it is believed that the measures taken to lessen this probability are adequate. An Appendix, Volume II, contains supporting information for this report, and is also intended to serve as a reference for future use.
Date: October 7, 1954
Creator: Binford, F. T.; Cole, T. E. & Gill, J. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Low Frequency Amplifier IH-130-1

Description: A tranistorized d.c. coupled amplifier having very good gain stability, as well as very low drift of the output d.c. level, has been designed. Low frequency input signals with an amplitude of .04 to 2 volts peak-to-peak, approximately, coming from a low impedance source (voice soil of a speaker system) are amplified to an approximate peak-to-peak amplitude of 4 volts. The output is intended to drive a load of the order of 100 kohm.
Date: October 23, 1961
Creator: Llacer, Jorge
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A Rapid Beam Deflector for the Brookhaven AGS

Description: An air cored pulse deflection coil has been constructed for the Brookhaven AGS. The system produces a deflecting pulse with a peak radial deflection of 2.5 cms and duration of 70 microseconds. Beam spill duration of 15 to 50 microseconds from the target is readily achieved. One deflector has given satisfactory service for over a year and a second unit has been installed this summer.
Date: October 2, 1962
Creator: Brown, H. N.; Culwick, B. B. & Forsyth, E. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Accelerator Development Department Internal Report

Description: In this report we present solutions of the design problem in which a system of quadruple lenses is required to carry a particle beam from given focal lines in the x and y planes to other given focal lines. Particular attention will be given to the case of the anastigmatic lens system which takes a beam from one focal point to another focal point. Since the general problem is almost impossibly complicated a simplification is introduced by breaking the lens system into two parts. The first part of the lens system is required to bring the initial beam to the state where it is parallel to the z axis in both planes. The second part carries the initially parallel beam to the required final condition. Each part will involve two quadrupoles so that the complete system will consist of four quadruples; usually, however, the field gradients in the second and third quadrupoles can be made identical so that those quadrupoles can be combined into one and the system becomes a three quadrupole system. The configuration of the lens element will be as shown in the figures below. These figures indicate also the general character of the beam path in the two planes.
Date: October 2, 1958
Creator: Blewett, J. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Deflecting Mode in the Circular Iris-Loaded Waveguide of a RF Particle Separator

Description: The rf particle separator, proposed in 1959 by W.K.H. Panofsky and now in preparation for the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, required a rf structure which gives a transverse impulse to a passing relativistic particle. In order to produce an accumulative transverse deflection of a traveling charged particle with an electromagnetic field, it is necessary that the field contains a synchronous component and in principle, waveguides and cavities are equivalent with respect to the particle dynamics. It was pointed out by H.G. Hereward, that the electric and magnetic deflection of a transverse electric mode (i.e., with no electric field component parallel to the direction of the particle velocity) cancel exactly at all particle velocities. The deflecting force of a transverse magnetic mode on a synchronous particle with the velocity v is proportional to the factor 1-(v/c)2 and vanishes therefore in the case of relativistic particles.
Date: October 25, 1962
Creator: Hahn, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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An Experimental Check On The Range-Energy Curve Of Pions In Propane

Description: The kinetic energies of pions from radioactive decays in propane have been determined by using the information given by the angles of the secondary particles. This method is independent of any range-energy relation.
Date: October 24, 1960
Creator: Patrick, Jack W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The RCA 6949 As A Self-Excited Cyclotron Oscillator

Description: The oscillator of the 88-in. cyclotron which is being built in Berkeley is tunable from 5.3 to 16.5 Mc. It delivers a maximum c-w power of 300 kw. At the rated doc voltage of 75 kv the resonator stores 4.5 joules of electrical energy. The transients produced by this amount of energy, during sparking, place unusual requirements upon the design of the oscillator tube. The features of the RCA 6949 which make it particularly well-suited to this type of application are discussed in this paper. Other topics covered are the oscillator anode power supply, the hard-tube modulator, protective equipment, and oscillator instrumentation.
Date: October 25, 1960
Creator: Smith, Bob H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A Preliminary Investigation Of The System Time Spread For Some Types Of Multiplier Phototubes

Description: A preliminary investigation of four types of multiplier phototubes under conditions simulating their use in scintillation and Cerenkov nuclear detectors is described. The investigation involves time-spread and rise-time measurements at different reference points on the outpost pulses, as well as observations of some special characteristics of these tubes.
Date: October 1960
Creator: El Hakim, Yahia
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A Radiofrequency Separator For High-Energy Particles

Description: This report is an outgrowth of the MURA Users' Conference of June 1959. At that conference the group on beam separators discussed the problem of whether particle separation could be achieved at the machine energies under consideration. A preliminary version of the scheme outlined here was given at the conference. Later, after flaws were discovered, it was modified. The attempt is not to show that this is the way it should be done, but to show with reasonable certainty that there is at least one way it can be done.
Date: October 28, 1959
Creator: Good, Myron L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Free Radicals In Photosynthetic Systems

Description: The method of detecting unpaired electrons in liquid and solid systems by electron spin resonance is discussed. The significance of the hyperfine structure in electron spin resonance is discussed and the possible use of these structural features of the electron spin resonance spectrum to elucidate the nature of the photoproduced unpaired electrons in photosynthesizing systems is introduced.
Date: October 8, 1958
Creator: Calvin, Melvin, 1911-1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Transistorized Linear Pulse Amplifiers

Description: The basic investigation of transistor feedback amplifiers has proven mathematically simple and of great practical value. The behavior of single-stage common-emitter amplifiers is described and provides a building block with which cascaded feedback amplifiers can be analyzed and designed. From the results of this analysis the conditions for minimum drift for cascaded single-stages and cascaded loops have been derived.
Date: October 27, 1958
Creator: Baker, Stanley C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Transistorized 10-Mc Decade Scaler

Description: This scaler was designed to replace an obsolescent tube design that was in general use at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in Livermore. The new design, using solid state devices and printed circuit modules, allows two complete scalers in one frame to occupy the same rack space as the tube design. Switches in the input circuits of the new scaler change input impedance and sensitivity for operation with either tube or transistor circuits. The use of transistors has greatly increased reliability, and has also reduced power by a factor of fifteen. Modular construction of all circuits, including the power supply, minimizes down time since all modules are replaceable without removing the scaler from its rack. Reliability, then cost, were the criteria dictating choice of components and circuits in the scaler design.
Date: October 24, 1963
Creator: Van Den Heuvel, C. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Test and Evaluation of Large Magnetic Tape-Wound Cores Used in the Astron Accelerator

Description: Project Sherwood is a nation-wide attempt to produce a controlled thermo-nuclear fusion reaction. The Astron experiment, conceived by Nicholas Christofilos, will utilize the effects of a cylindrical layer of relativistic electrons to contain and heat the plasma. A high quality, 200-ampere, 5-Me V electron beam is required to form the electron layer. The electron beam is produced by a linear induction electron accelerator. Three hundred and thirty-three toroidal cores of magnetic material surround an evacuated ceramic accelerating column. The electrons are accelerated by the transverse electric field produced by the changing flux. The magnetic cores are tape-wound toroids of .001", 50% Ni - 50% Fe. Two hundred eighty-eight cores are 24" o.d. x 8-1/2" i. d. x 1/2" thick and the remaining forty-five are 33" o. d. x 18" i. d. x 1/2" thick. Each core is required to support 16 kG for 0.4 psec. The choice of magnetic material was made by testing all available material for the required parameters. Results of these tests are presented.
Date: October 15, 1963
Creator: Sewell, Roger L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Cosmic Rays From Large Supernovae

Description: The theory of the hydrodynamic origin of cosmic rays proposed by Johnson and the author (Colgate) has developed to the point where the final evolution of a star to the supernova instability and subsequent explosion can be described with sufficient detail such that cosmic rays with appropriate intensity, composition, and spectrum to account for observations are a logical and necessary result. In the first publication it was pointed out that nuclei in the surface of the star may acquire many orders or magnitude more than the average energy per particle released in the explosion because of the large ratio of matter density between the core and the outer mantle. A shock from a sudden pressure increase in the core intensifies as it advances into lower-density material, thereby imparting extreme relativistic energies to the outermost layers. The shock wave was assumed on the basis that the observed explosion occurred in a time short compared to the traversal time of sound across the dimensions of the star. It was argued without proof that an adiabatic process would be inconsistent with the accepted gravitational instability as the trigger mechanism. In an attempt to confirm this supposition we extend the hydrodynamic calculations to describe in detail the initial gravitational unstable collapse of a highly evolved massive star as first predicted by Burbidge et al.
Date: October 21, 1963
Creator: Colgate, S. A. & White, R. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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