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1984 Federal Interim Storage fee study: a technical and economic analysis

Description: JAI examined alternative methods for structuring charges for Federal Interim Storage (FIS) services were examined and the conclusion reached that the combined interests of the Department and the users would be best served, and costs most appropriately recovered, by a two-part fee involving an Initial Payment upon execution of a contract for FIS services followed by a Final Payment upon delivery of the spent fuel to the Department. The Initial Payment would be an advance payment covering the pro rata share of preoperational costs, including (1) the capital costs of the required transfer facilities and storage area, (2) development costs, (3) government administrative costs including storage fund management, and (4) impact aid payments made in accordance with section 136(e) of the Act. The Final Payment would be made at the time of delivery of the spent fuel to the Department and would be calculated to cover the sum of the following: (1) any under-or over-estimation in the costs used to calculate the Initial Payment of the fee including savings due to rod consolidation), (2) module costs (i.e., storage casks, drywells, or silos), and (3) the total estimated cost of operation and decommissioning of the FIS facilities (including government administrative costs, storage fund management and impact aid). Charges for the transport of spent fuel from the reactor site to FIS facilities would be separately assessed at cost since these will be specific to each reactor site and destination.
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: E.R. Johnson Associates, Inc
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Accelerator Technology Program. Status report, January-September 1983

Description: This report presents highlights of major projects in the Accelerator Technology Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first section deals with the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility's 2-MeV accelerator on which tests began in May, as scheduled. Then, activities are reported on beam dynamics, inertial fusion, structure development, the racetrack microtron, the CERN high-energy physics experiment NA-12, and LAMPF II. The Proton Storage Ring is discussed next, with emphasis on the computer control system, diagnostics interfacing, and theoretical support. Other sections summarize progress on a portable radiographic linac, developments on the klystron code, and on permanent magnets. Activities of the Theory and Simulation Group are outlined next, followed by discussion of the oscillator experiment and the energy-recovery experiment in the free electron laser project. The last section reports on the accelerator test stand. An unusual and very satisfying activity for the Division was the hosting of the 1983 Particle Accelerator Conference in Santa Fe, March 21-23, 1983. The conference had the largest attendance ever, with 895 registrants, 61 invited papers, and 521 contributed papers.
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Jameson, R.A. (comp.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Air sampler performance at Ford's farm range

Description: An air-sampling system for a large-caliber depleted uranium (DU) penetrator firing range was tested. The objectives of the test were: to determine the bias between the monitoring readings and DU concentrations; and to determine if the target bay real-time monitor (RTM) tracks the decaying dust concentration. The test procedure was to operate total and respirable airborne particle samplers adjacent to the target bay monitors. A series of air samples was also taken after the test firings adjacent to the target bay RTM. Exhaust particle samples were analyzed for gross alpha, gross beta and uranium content. The target bay RTM correlated well (0.977) with the sequential samples. Average concentration from the RTM did not correlate with either the long-term total or respirable sampler DU concentrations. The monitor used to confirm a low dust concentration when the door is open correlated well (0.810) with the RTM; the other bay monitor did not. In the ventilation discharge, the long-term average monitor readings did not correlate with DU concentrations, probably due to levels near lower detection limits. Smearable surface-contamination samples showed highest contamination on the equipment, gravel floor and exhaust intake. The location air-intake contamination increased over the first 3 rounds. Contamination was reduced by a low-pressure water spray washdown to about the same concentration as often the second round, then remained at about twice the level. 2 references, 18 figures, 16 tables. (MF)
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Glissmeyer, J.A. & Johnston, J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Airborne radioactive effluent study at the Savannah River Plant

Description: Under the Clean Air Act, Sections 112 and 122 as amended in 1977, the Office of Radiation Programs (OPR) of the United States Environmental Protection Agency is currently developing standards for radionuclides emitted to the air by several source categories. In order to confirm source-term measurements and pathway calculations for radiation exposures to humans offsite, the ORP performs field studies at selected facilities that emit radionuclides. This report describes the field study conducted at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), a laboratory operated by E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company for the US Department of Energy. This purpose of the study at ARP was to verify reported airborne releases and resulting radiation doses from the facility. Measurements of radionuclide releases for brief periods were compared with measurements performed by SRP staff on split samples and with annual average releases reported by SRP for the same facilities. The dispersion model used by SRP staff to calculate radiation doses offsite was tested by brief environmental radioactivity measurements performed simultaneously with the release measurements, and by examining radioactivity levels in environmental samples. This report describes in detail all measurements made and data collected during the field study and presents the results obtained. 34 references, 18 figures, 49 tables.
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Blanchard, R.L.; Broadway, J.A.; Sensintaffar, E.L.; Kirk, W.P.; Kahn, B. & Garrett, A.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Americium thermodynamic data for the EQ3/6 database

Description: Existing thermodynamic data for aqueous and solid species of americium have been reviewed and collected in a form that can be used with the EQ3/6 database. Data that are important in solubility calculations for americium at a proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository were emphasized. Conflicting data exist for americium complexes with carbonates. Essentially no data are available for americium solids or complexes at temperatures greater than 25{sup 0}C. 17 references, 4 figures.
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Kerrisk, J.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Analyses of the impact of inservice inspection using a piping reliability model

Description: This report presents the results of a study of the impact of inservice inspection (ISI) programs on the reliability of specific nuclear piping systems that have actually failed in service. Two major factors are considered in the ISI programs: one is the capability of detecting flaws; the other is the frequency of performing ISI. A probabilistic fracture mechanics model is used to estimate the reliability of two nuclear piping lines over the plant life as functions of the ISI programs. Examples chosen for the study are the PWR feedwater steam generator nozzle cracking incident and the BWR recirculation line safe-end cracking incident. The results show that an effective inservice inspection requires a suitable combination of flaw detection capability and inspection schedule. An augmented inspection schedule is required for piping with fast-growing flaws to ensure that the inspection is done before the flaws reach critical sizes. Also, the elimination of poor inspection teams through training and qualification testing can produce significant benefits to ISI effectiveness.
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Simonen, F.A. & Woo, H.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Assessment of the impacts of spent fuel disassembly alternatives on the Nuclear Waste Isolation System. [Preparing and packaging spent fuel assemblies for geologic disposal]

Description: The objective of this report was to evaluate four possible alternative methods of preparing and packaging spent fuel assemblies for geologic disposal against the Reference Process of unmodified spent fuel. The four alternative processes were: (1) End fitting removal, (2) Fission gas venting and resealing, (3) Fuel bundle disassembly and close packing of fuel pins, and (4) Fuel shearing and immobilization. Systems analysis was used to develop a basis of comparison of the alternatives. Conceptual processes and facility layouts were devised for each of the alternatives, based on technology deemed feasible for the purpose. Assessments were made of 15 principal attributes from the technical, operational, safety/risk, and economic considerations related to each of the alternatives, including both the surface packaging and underground repository operations. Specific attributes of the alternative processes were evaluated by assigning a number for each that expressed its merit relative to the corresponding attribute of the Reference Process. Each alternative process was then ranked by summing the numbers for attributes in each of the four assessment areas and collectively. Fuel bundle disassembly and close packing of fuel pins was ranked the preferred method of disposal of spent fuel. 63 references, 46 figures, 46 tables.
Date: July 1, 1984
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Brazoria County Re-Leveling Pleasant Bayou Geopressured Well Site

Description: The purpose is to conduct first order leveling surveys as part of an ongoing environmental monitoring program for geopressured-geothermal test wells. The scope is to Conduct First Order, Class I, leveling to monitor subsidence of previously installed and leveled bench marks, established by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and Vernon F. Meyer and Associates, Inc., in the area of the Pleasant Bayou geopressured test well. All leveling surveys to conform to NGS standards and specifications.
Date: July 1, 1984
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Burner Stabilized Flames in Fluids

Description: In this report it is shown that a burner placed in a combustible fluid can have a stabilizing effect on a plane flame. A mathematical model is derived in which the flame is modeled as a surface of discontinuity in the flow field. Jump conditions for the fluid variables, as well as an expression for the flame speed, are obtained from an asymptotic analysis of the detailed structure of the flame. The model is applied to investigate the linear stability of a plane flame. Stable behavior is shown to exist for certain regimes of the parameters: Lewis number, burner strength, heat release and inflow velocity.
Date: July 1984
Creator: Kaper, Hans G.; Leaf, Gary K.; Matalon, Moshe & Matkowsky, Bernard J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Cascade: a review of heat transport and plant design issues

Description: A conceptual heat transfer loop for Cascade, a centrifugal-action solid-breeder reaction chamber, has been investigated and results are presented. The Cascade concept, a double-cone-shaped reaction chamber, rotates along its horizontal axis. Solid Li/sub 2/O or other lithium-ceramic granules are injected tangentially through each end of the chamber. The granules cascade axially from the smaller radii at the ends to the larger radius at the center, where they are ejected into a stationary granule catcher. Heat and tritium are then removed from the granules and the granules are reinjected into the chamber. A 50% dense Li/sub 2/O granule throughput of 2.8 m/sup 3//s is transferred from the reaction chamber to the steam generators via continuous bucket elevators. The granules then fall by gravity through 4 vertical steam generators. The entire transport system is maintained at the same vacuum conditions present inside the reaction chamber.
Date: July 31, 1984
Creator: Murray, K.A. & McDowell, M.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Catalytic coal liquefaction. Final technical report, June 1, 1981-May 31, 1984

Description: Molybdenum catalysts (both supported and unsupported) have been examined in various stages of preparation and use with respect to BET surface area and low temperature oxygen chemisorption. The results are detailed. X-ray diffraction has been used to characterize ammonium molybdate - after calcination, heated in tetralin under nitrogen and after use in an autoclave. Metal salts have been tested for catalytic effects by heating a tetralin-coal mixture (without hydrogen) at a loading of 1% of the coal. Only ammonium heptamolybdate and stannous chloride had a large incremental effect (based on blank runs with tetralin and catalyst without coal). Differences in liquefaction behavior in tubing bombs and in autoclaves are explained by thermodynamic considerations based on the gas to liquid volume in the two cases. (LTN)
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Weller, S. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Chaos and related nonlinear noise phenomena in Josephson tunnel junctions

Description: The nonlinear dynamics of Josephson tunnel junctions shunted by a resistance with substantial self-inductance have been thoroughly investigated. The current-voltage characteristics of these devices exhibit stable regions of negative differential resistance. Very large increases in the low-frequency voltage noise with equivalent noise temperatures of 10/sup 6/ K or more, observed in the vicinity of these regions, arise from switching, or hopping, between subharmonic modes. Moderate increases in the noise, with temperatures of about 10/sup 3/ K, arise from chaotic behavior. Analog and digital simulations indicate that under somewhat rarer circumstances the same junction system can sustain a purely deterministic hopping between two unstable subharmonic modes, accompanied by excess low-frequency noise. Unlike the noise-induced case, this chaotic process occurs over a much narrower range in bias current and is destroyed by the addition of thermal noise. The differential equation describing the junction system can be reduced to a one-dimensional mapping in the vicinity of one of the unstable modes. A general analytical calculation of switching processes for a class of mappings yields the frequency dependence of the noise spectrum in terms of the parameters of the mapping. Finally, the concepts of noise-induced hopping near bifurcation thresholds are applied to the problem of the three-photon Josephson parametric amplifier. Analog simulations indicate that the noise rise observed in experimental devices arises from occasional hopping between a mode at the pump frequency ..omega../sub p/ and a mode at the half harmonic ..omega../sub p//2. The hopping is induced by thermal noise associated with the shunt resistance. 71 references.
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Miracky, R.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Characterization of emergency preparedness at DOE contractor facilities

Description: A study of emergency preparedness capabilities at DOE facilities was initiated following the incident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) Nuclear Power Station. It was designed to parallel but expand on a study on emergency preparedness instrumentation that was conducted in 1970 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The 1970 survey findings led to the publication of four reports on performance criteria for radiological emergency instrumentation. Three of these reports - BNWL-1635 (Selby et al. 1972), BNWL-1742 (Anderson et al. 1974) and BNWL-1857 (Andersen et al. 1976) - addressed the criteria for emergency instrumentation at reactors, mixed oxide fuel fabrication plants, and fuel reprocessing plants, respectively. The fourth report, BNWL-1991 (Bramson et al. 1976), addressed evaluation testing and calibration methodology for these instruments. This report is presented in three parts. Part One is a review of the BNWL documents to determine whether they are applicable to state-of-the-art instrument capabilities. The Appendix to Part One provides a comparison between the instrument performance criteria established in BNWL-1991 to applicable American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards for portable survey and contamination meters, installed radiation and area monitors, effluent monitors, calibration techniques, criticality detection systems, alarm systems, and direct reading dosimeters. Part Two compares the 1970 survey results with the 1980 survey results to identify trends in emergency preparedness. Part Three is a discussion of the results of the 1980 emergency preparedness survey and the supporting data for each of the 15 modules. 8 references. (ACR)
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Gillings, J. C.; Murphy, B. L.; Corbit, C. D.; MacLellan, J. A.; Essig, T. H.; Higby, D. P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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CO + H/sub 2/ reaction over nitrogen-modified iron catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1-March 31, 1984

Description: We have found that the nitride catalysts lose substantial amounts of nitrogen during the initial minutes of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. In order to further study the stability of these catalysts, we have concentrated on the decomposition of the nitride in hydrogen. In addition, we have prepared a range of epsilon-Fe/sub x/N (2 < x < 3) phases. The Moessbauer parameters from these phases will aid in the identification and fitting of the transient epsilon phases formed during the carburization of Xi-Fe/sub 2/N. Extremely rapid nitrogen loss has been observed from Xi-Fe/sub 2/N in H/sub 2/ at 523 K both in constant velocity Moessbauer and in transient mass spectrometer experiments. In order to study the phase change from Xi-Fe/sub 2/N to ..cap alpha..-Fe in more detail, the hydrogenation temperature was decreased to 473 K and intermediate samples were quenched in liquid nitrogen to lock in the phase distribution for subsequent Moessbauer study. The spectra show complete conversion to ..cap alpha..-Fe at or before 21 minutes at 473 K. The intermediate samples show evidence of an extremely sharp gradient; only a very small amount of ..gamma..' or epsilon phase is observed. Thus, a moving front model of the phase transformation appears to be appropriate. Mass spectroscopy of the hydrogenation of Xi-Fe/sub 2/N at 523 K showed similar behavior to that of both the ..gamma..' and epsilon phases, in which an active surface species and a slowly activating one were observed. The H/sub 2/ was replaced by D/sub 2/ in this experiment in order to observe partially hydrogenated surface species in the initial spike of ammonia. All NH/sub x/D/sub y/ (x + y = 3) species were observed in this spike, indicating extremely rapid surface H/D exchange with gaseous ammonia. The fragmentation pattern of NH/sub 3/ in the mass spectrometer was also determined and …
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Delgass, W.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Columbia River Salmonid Outmigration: McNary Dam Passage and Enhanced Smolt Quality, 1984 Second Year Completion Report.

Description: The effects of the McNary Dam transportation system on emigrating fall and spring chinook smolts were evaluated using physiological indices of stress (e.g., plasma cortisol, hepatic glycogen, leucocrit, interrenal cell nuclear diameter) and performance tests (e.g., saltwater challenge, secondary stress challenge, disease resistance). Controlled experiments were conducted in a hatchery environment to characterize the fishes' physiological responses to stress, and disease resistance to allow a basis for judging the nature of the stress experienced by smolts at McNary Dam. 55 figs., 3 tabs.
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Schreck, Carl B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Composite-bed reactor for upgrading coal-derived liquids. Quarterly report No. 3, April 1-June 30, 1984

Description: Five experimental runs were conducted as a part of the temperature and catalyst zoned concept. These experiments were conducted at 10.3 MPa (1500 psig), with the bottom zone reactor at 400/sup 0/C (752/sup 0/F), LHST of 1.9 h, with 20% (wt) of the catalyst in the top zone and utilizing a variable temperature in the top zone 400 to 500/sup 0/C (752 to 932/sup 0/F). Excessive reactor plugging occurred when the top zone was operated at 500/sup 0/C (932/sup 0/F). This suggests an upper limit when utilizing the feedstock of 15% (wt) mixture of SRC in a coal liquefaction process solvent, and with a commercial grade catalyst, Armak KF-153-S, a Ni-Mo type. All temperature zoning combinations showed a loss in catalyst activation over the experimental run durations of 72 h. Activity loss was rapid in the first 30 to 40 h and gradual thereafter. This activity loss was caused by carbonaceous material and metals deposition. Increasing the top zone temperature from 400 (752/sup 0/F) to 450/sup 0/C (842/sup 0/F) provided a beneficial effect on HDN and HDM activity. A further temperature increase was detrimental because of excessive coking and possible thermodynamic equilibrium limitations. The one reference run that was conducted for the catalyst zone study utilized 400/sup 0/C (752/sup 0/F) in both zones, the same feedstock, catalyst, and operational conditions as reported above. Sample analyses are not yet completed. 7 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.
Date: July 9, 1984
Creator: Crynes, B.L. & Seapan, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Containment purge and vent valve program. Final report

Description: This report describes the Test Piping System and Instrumentation used to determine the forces acting against the actuator when closing a butterfly valve against flow. Locations of the test instrumentation are shown and photos of the installation are included. The techniques for determining bearing and packing resistance, seating forces and fluid dynamic forces are described. Various problems encountered and corrective actions taken are discussed. Typical plots are included to illustrate the results obtained. Complete sets of data for each valve program were transmitted to EG and G, Idaho for detailed analysis.
Date: July 12, 1984
Creator: Archbold, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Coupled gas flow/solid dynamics model for predicting the formation of fracture patterns in gas well simulation experiments. [Propellant mixture used instead of explosives to fracture rock surrounding borehole]

Description: A two-dimensional finite element model for predicting fracture patterns obtained in high energy gas fracture experiments is presented. In these experiments, a mixture of propellants is used instead of explosives to fracture the rock surrounding the borehole. The propellant mixture is chosen to tailor the pressure pulse so that multiple fractures emanate from the borehole. The model allows the fracture pattern and pressure pulse to be calculated for different combinations of propellant mixture, in situ stress conditions, and rock properties. The model calculates the amount of gas generated by the burning propellants using a burn rate given by a power law in pressure. By assuming that the gas behaves as a perfect gas and that the flow down the fractures is isothermal, the loss of gas from the borehole due to flow down the cracks is accounted for. The flow of gas down the cracks is included in an approximate manner by assuming self-similar pressure profiles along the fractures. Numerical examples are presented and compared to three different full-scale experiments. Results show a good correlation with the experimental data over a wide variety of test parameters. 9 reference, 10 figures, 3 tables.
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Taylor, L.M.; Swenson, D.V. & Cooper, P.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Data base for the analysis of compositional characteristics of coal seams and macerals. Final report - Part 10. Variability in the inorganic content of United States' coals: a multivariate statistical study

Description: The multivariate statistical techniques of correlation coefficients, factor analysis, and cluster analysis, implemented by computer programs, can be used to process a large data set and produce a summary of relationships between variables and between samples. These techniques were used to find relationships for data on the inorganic constituents of US coals. Three hundred thirty-five whole-seam channel samples from six US coal provinces were analyzed for inorganic variables. After consideration of the attributes of data expressed on ash basis and whole-coal basis, it was decided to perform complete statistical analyses on both data sets. Thirty variables expressed on whole-coal basis and twenty-six variables expressed on ash basis were used. For each inorganic variable, a frequency distribution histogram and a set of summary statistics was produced. These were subdivided to reveal the manner in which concentrations of inorganic constituents vary between coal provinces and between coal regions. Data collected on 124 samples from three stratigraphic groups (Pottsville, Monongahela, Allegheny) in the Appalachian region were studied using analysis of variance to determine degree of variability between stratigraphic levels. Most variables showed differences in mean values between the three groups. 193 references, 71 figures, 54 tables.
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Glick, D. C. & Davis, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Delta: the first pion nucleon resonance - its discovery and applications

Description: It is attempted to recapture some of the fun and excitement of the pion-scattering work that led to the discovery of what is now called the delta particle. How significant this discovery was became apparent only gradually. That the delta is alive today and thriving at Los Alamos (as well as other places) is described.
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Nagle, Darragh E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Displacement Damage in the First Structural Wall of an Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor: Dependence on Blanket Design

Description: In this study we investigate how the design of the neutron blanket effects the displacement damage rate in the first structural wall (FSW) of an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) reactor. Two generic configurations are examined; in the first, the steel wall is directly exposed to the fusion neutrons, whereas in the second, the steel wall is protected by inner blanket of lithium with an effective thickness of 1-m. The latter represents a HYLIFE-type design, which has been shown to have displacement damage rates an order of magnitude lower than unprotected wall designs. The two basic configurations were varied to show how the dpa rate changes as the result of (1) adding a Li blanket outside the FSW, (2) adding a neutron reflector (graphite) outside the FSW, and (3) changing the position of the inner lithium blanket relative to the FSW. The effects of neutron moderation in the compressed DT-target are also shown, and the unprotected and protected configurations compared.
Date: July 13, 1984
Creator: Meier, Wayne R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Distribution of radionuclides and water in Bandelier Tuff beneath a former Los Alamos liquid waste disposal site after 33 years

Description: The distribution of radionuclides and water in Bandelier Tuff beneath a former liquid waste disposal site at Los Alamos was investigated. The waste use history of the site was described, as well as several pertinent laboratory and field studies of water and radionuclide migration in Bandelier Tuff. The distribution of plutonium, /sup 241/Am, and water was determined in a set of about 800 tuff samples collected to sampling depths of 30 m beneath two absorption beds. These data were then related to site geohydrologic data. Water and radionuclide concentrations found after 33 years were compared with the results of similar studies previously performed at this site, and the implications of these comparisons are discussed relative to nuclear waste management. 19 references, 6 figures, 4 tables.
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Nyhan, J.W.; Drennon, B.J.; Abeele, W.V.; Trujillo, G.; Herrera, W.J.; Wheeler, M.L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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E-Division activities report

Description: E (Experimental Physics) Division carries out basic and applied research in atomic and nuclear physics, in materials science, and in other areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Some of the activities are cooperative efforts with other divisions of the Laboratory, and, in a few cases, with other laboratories. Many of the experiments are directly applicable to problems in weapons and energy, some have only potential applied uses, and others are in pure physics. This report presents abstracts of papers published by E (Experimental Physics) Division staff members between July 1983 and June 1984. In addition, it lists the members of the scientific staff of the division, including visitors and students, and some of the assignments of staff members on scientific committees. A brief summary of the budget is included.
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Barschall, H.H. (comp.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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