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Cascade: a review of heat transport and plant design issues

Description: A conceptual heat transfer loop for Cascade, a centrifugal-action solid-breeder reaction chamber, has been investigated and results are presented. The Cascade concept, a double-cone-shaped reaction chamber, rotates along its horizontal axis. Solid Li/sub 2/O or other lithium-ceramic granules are injected tangentially through each end of the chamber. The granules cascade axially from the smaller radii at the ends to the larger radius at the center, where they are ejected into a stationary granule catcher. Heat and tritium are then removed from the granules and the granules are reinjected into the chamber. A 50% dense Li/sub 2/O granule throughput of 2.8 m/sup 3//s is transferred from the reaction chamber to the steam generators via continuous bucket elevators. The granules then fall by gravity through 4 vertical steam generators. The entire transport system is maintained at the same vacuum conditions present inside the reaction chamber.
Date: July 31, 1984
Creator: Murray, K.A. & McDowell, M.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Measurements of satellite refrigerator compressor power consumption and efficiency

Description: Each of the thirty compressors installed around the ring and at switchyard is an oil-injected, two-stage, Mycom screw compressor, driven by either a 350 hp or 400 hp motor. The reader is referred to TM1198 by John Satti for a detailed description of these compressors and the associated equipment. Since the power consumed by these compressors is a major operating expense for our accelerator, we were interested in measuring the power consumption and efficiency of our compressors. Two compressors were studied in detail - one having a GE 350 hp motor (F0 No. 2) and one a new GE 400 hp high efficiency motor (F0 No. 1). Data were taken for each compressor with the high stage always fully loaded. These data and values calculated from the data are tabulated.
Date: July 30, 1984
Creator: Hentges, M.; James, A.; Peterson, T. & Urso, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Radiation doses in granite around emplacement holes in the Spent Fuel Test - Climax. Final report

Description: Final comparisons are made between measured and calculated radiation doses around the holes in which the spent fuel was emplaced in the Spent Fuel Test - Climax. Neutron doses were found to be negligible compared with gamma doses. Good agreement was found between the doses predicted by Monte Carlo calculations and those measured by short-exposure thermoluminescence dosimetry. Poor agreement was found between the calculational results and doses measured by exposure of LiF optical-absorption-type dosimeters for long periods, probably because of an inability to accurately correct for fade resulting from elevated temperature exposure over several months. The maximum dose to the rock occurred at the walls of the emplacement holes, and amounted to 1.6 MGy (1.6 x 10{sup 8} rad) in granite for the emplacement period of nearly 3 years. It is recommended that dose evaluations for future high-level nuclear waste storage facilities also be performed by combining calculations and dosimetry. Passive dosimetry techniques, if used, should involve short exposures, so that laboratory calibrations can be performed with duplicate time, temperature, dose rate, and dose parameters. An attractive alternative would be to use active ionization chambers, inserted only periodically. These could be calibrated under appropriate temperature and pressure conditions, and could be read directly. 23 references, 7 figures, 8 tables.
Date: July 26, 1984
Creator: Van Konynenburg, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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RHIC Aperture

Description: No Description Available.
Date: July 25, 1984
Creator: Parzen, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Integration of advanced preparation with coal liquefaction. Third quarterly technical progress report, April 1-June 30, 1984

Description: The objective of this work is to explore the technoeconomic feasibility of a series of unit operations involving: (1) wet grinding of coal in water; (2) removal of chlorine and sodium, release of undesirable mineral matter, and chemical incorporation, if needed, of a disposable liquefaction catalyst in coal via hot water teatment; (3) oil agglomeration to dewater and deash coal while retaining most of the pyrite; and (4) solvent drying of coal agglomerates to eliminate oxidation of coal, improve coal liquefaction reactivity, save energy and prepare the coal/solvent slurry for liquefaction. An apparatus capable of running five microautoclaves simultaneously has been designed and constructed. The autoclaves are shaken along the long axis to insure good mixing and pressure and temperature can be monitored in each autocalve during the run. Reproducibility experiments indicate that the standard deviation on the conversion to THF solubles is about 2.5 percent. The standard deviations in conversions to preasphaltenes and asphaltenes are much higher. A five-autoclave experiment has confirmed earlier results which indicate that wet grinding and hot-water treatment have little effect on conversion to THF solubles but that oil agglomeration followed by drying in a vacuum oven causes a large increase and oil agglomeration followed by solvent drying causes a significant but smaller increase in conversion. 5 references, 13 figures.
Date: July 24, 1984
Creator: Steedman, W.G.; Longanbach, J.R.; Muralidhara, H.S.; Folsom, D.W. & Droege, J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Temperature rise in iron beam position monitors

Description: This note presents the results of EGS calculations for the temperature rise in an iron beam position monitor strip in the SLC arcs for a 50 GeV incident electron beam. Temperature rises of about 830/sup 0/C per pulse are possible for 50..mu.. (Gaussian sigma) beams of 5 x 10/sup 10/ electrons per pulse if the angle of incidence is great (i.e., around 30 mradians).
Date: July 24, 1984
Creator: Nelson, W. R. & Jenkins, T. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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EP-toxicity testing of mercury removal resin grout

Description: To determine which category a waste will fit into, the EPA requires a classification test. The test, EP-toxicity, consists of a physical integrity test followed by an extraction. For the case of the mercury removal resin grout, the mercury concentration in the extract cannot exceed 0.2 mg/L if the waste is to be classified as ``solid waste.`` Otherwise, the waste is classified as ``hazardous.`` Simulated process solutions were used to load the mercury removal resin. The resin was solidified with the addition of cement and water using a formulation based on grout formulations typically used to solidify power reactor ion exchange resins. Envirodyne Engineers of St. Louis, Missouri, an EPA sanctioned laboratory, performed the EP-toxicity test for the two samples. One sample was a blank which was made with unloaded resin. For the formulation tested, the EP-toxicity test results showed that the mercury removal resin grout does not fit into the ``hazardous waste`` category.
Date: July 18, 1984
Creator: Mersman, K. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Reaction of the Topopah Spring Tuff with J-13 water at 120{sup 0}C

Description: This report describes a series of hydrothermal experiments using crushed tuff from the Topopah Spring Member and natural ground water from well J-13. The purpose of these experiments is to define the changes in water chemistry that would result from temperature changes caused by emplacing high-level nuclear waste in a repository in the Topopah Spring tuff. Experiments were conducted at 120{sup 0}C in Teflon-lined reaction vessels at four separate rock-to-water ratios and for reaction times up to 72 days. The composition of evaporite deposits contained in the pores of the surface-outcrop rock material used in these experiments is determined from solution compositions resulting from treatment of the rock before the start of the experiments. Results from the experiments at 120{sup 0}C are compared with previous experimental results from hydrothermal reaction of the Topopah Spring tuff with J-13 water at 90 and 150{sup 0}C. The main conclusion that can be drawn from this work is that changes in the water chemistry due to heating of the rock-water system can be expected to be very minor. There is no significant source of anions (F{sup -}, Cl{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, or SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) in the rock; solution anion compositions after reaction of pretreated rock with J-13 water differ very little from the starting compositions. The major changes in cations are an increase in silica to approximately the level of cristobalite solubility, supersaturation of aluminum followed by slow precipitation, and fairly rapid precipitation of calcium and magnesium due to the retrograde solubility of calcite. These results are in good agreement with those previously reported for reaction of the tuff with J-13 water at 90 and 150{sup 0}C. 7 references, 7 figures, 28 tables.
Date: July 18, 1984
Creator: Oversby, V.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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MOD silver metallization for photovoltaics. Quarterly technical report, March 1, 1984-May 31, 1984. [Metalloorganic deposition]

Description: It was demonstrated that the nature of the initial solvent used to extract the silver neodecanoate during synthesis or to render it into solution for ink formulation has a profound influence on fired film properties. The lower the boiling point of the initial solvent, the more of it was removed during rotary vacuum evaporation, and the less effect it had on fired film properties. Benzene and tetrahydrofuran were superior to xylene and toluene, and inks which used them in their preparation produced fired films with excellent appearance and adhesion if the proper firing sequence was used. The best films also had electrical resistivities very close to that of pure silver, which indicates that near theoretical density was achieved. Platinum and palladium metallo-organic compounds were investigated so that fired films with good solder leach resistance could be produced. Six metallo-organic compounds were synthesized, four of them were used to make inks, and the properties of films made from these inks were evaluated. The most promising compound evaluated was Pt 2,4 pentane dionate, but additional studies are required.
Date: July 16, 1984
Creator: Vest, G.M. & Vest, R.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The solubility of uranium hexafluoride in perfluoroethers

Description: The polyperfluoroethers are compatible with uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) and are suitable for use in diffusion pumps and in mechanical vacuum pumps which rely on oil as both the lubricant and the seal. The UF/sub 6/ is soluble in all fluids with which it is compatible. Because a number of vacuum pumps in the BOP facilities of the GCEP plant employ these perfluoroether oils as the working fluid and have oil chambers which are large, questions have been raised as to the relationships governing the solubility of UF/sub 6/ in these materials and the maximum quantities of UF/sub 6/ which could be dissolved in these oils under credible accident conditions. This report summarizes these solubility relations and the interaction of the UF/sub 6/ solubility and the pumping capability of this type of vacuum pump. It will be shown that, whereas the solubility of UF/sub 6/ in Fomblin Y25 fluoroether fluid under a UF/sub 6/ pressure of 760 torr and at the pump operating temperature of 160/sup 0/F is about 500 g of UF/sub 6/ per liter of oil, the system controls are such as to isolate the system from the pumps before the quantity of UF/sub 6/ dissolved in the perfluoroether exceeds about 10 g of UF/sub 6/ per liter of oil. 13 refs., 7 figs.
Date: July 15, 1984
Creator: Barber, E. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Stress studies in EFG. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1984-March 31, 1984

Description: Four-point bending studies have been continued to compare primary creep response of FZ and CZ silicon above 1200/sup 0/C. Results suggest that silicon can be treated as a completely plastic solid in the temperature range 1200 to 1400/sup 0/C in its response to thermal stress generated during sheet growth. In the stress range of 5 to 15 MPa, the strain rate dependence on stress is epsilon approx. sigma/sup 10/, and appears to be essentially temperature independent. Work is underway to compare stresses predicted for two different thermal models used for temperature field calculations. Stress analysis has been performed to illustrate the dependence of sheet stresses on growth parameters such as sheet width, thickness and growth speed, and the coupling of these parameters to the details of the temperature field calculations used as input to the stress model. The construction of a simplified EFG ribbon system to be used to test the stress model and to investigate means to achieve low stress growth configurations is completed. The first results of measurement of residual stress distributions in EFG sheet using shadow-Moire interferometry have been obtained at the University of Illinois.
Date: July 15, 1984
Creator: Kalejs, J.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Displacement Damage in the First Structural Wall of an Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor: Dependence on Blanket Design

Description: In this study we investigate how the design of the neutron blanket effects the displacement damage rate in the first structural wall (FSW) of an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) reactor. Two generic configurations are examined; in the first, the steel wall is directly exposed to the fusion neutrons, whereas in the second, the steel wall is protected by inner blanket of lithium with an effective thickness of 1-m. The latter represents a HYLIFE-type design, which has been shown to have displacement damage rates an order of magnitude lower than unprotected wall designs. The two basic configurations were varied to show how the dpa rate changes as the result of (1) adding a Li blanket outside the FSW, (2) adding a neutron reflector (graphite) outside the FSW, and (3) changing the position of the inner lithium blanket relative to the FSW. The effects of neutron moderation in the compressed DT-target are also shown, and the unprotected and protected configurations compared.
Date: July 13, 1984
Creator: Meier, Wayne R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Investigation of non-intrusive radiometer for entrained gasifier temperature measurement. First quarterly report, October 30, 1983-January 30, 1984

Description: The emphasis during the first quarter has been directed toward evaluating radiometric approaches to find the optimum technique to measure temperature in an entrained gasifier environment. In this regard, it was concluded that while total radiation measurements were helpful in providing designers with total radiation loads to hardware, it was not acceptable as a means of measuring temperature for the gas/particle environment considered. To make the temperature measurements, one, two, and three line radiometers (pyrometers) were evaluated. It was found that a single (one) line pyrometer measurement of resonance radiation from a trace alkalai metal in the gas provides a very promising technique to provide spatially resolved temperature measurements. A detailed description of governing equations controlling this technique is given. During the next quarter, laboratory prototype probes will be assembled, tested and evaluated. 8 figures, 10 tables.
Date: July 13, 1984
Creator: Fairchild, P.; Gat, N. & Witte, A.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Containment purge and vent valve program. Final report

Description: This report describes the Test Piping System and Instrumentation used to determine the forces acting against the actuator when closing a butterfly valve against flow. Locations of the test instrumentation are shown and photos of the installation are included. The techniques for determining bearing and packing resistance, seating forces and fluid dynamic forces are described. Various problems encountered and corrective actions taken are discussed. Typical plots are included to illustrate the results obtained. Complete sets of data for each valve program were transmitted to EG and G, Idaho for detailed analysis.
Date: July 12, 1984
Creator: Archbold, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Linac quadrupole connections

Description: Linac type QC and QCH quadrupoles are mounted on the accelerator with their power connection side facing the injector. The connections are on the top of the magnet. The correct polarity for magnets is shown. The magnetic centers of all magnets are measured. If the magnetic center is above the geometric center, the distance delta y is positive. If the magnetic center is to the right of the geometric center, the distance delta x is positive.
Date: July 12, 1984
Creator: Stiening, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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North and South Damping Ring nomenclature

Description: This summary describes the new nomenclature for the beamline components of the Damping Rings Region.
Date: July 12, 1984
Creator: Linebarger, W. & Silva, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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SLC nomenclature for beamline components

Description: The purpose of this report is to document the SLC nomenclature conventions for beamline components. Included are recent enhancements which should lead to a more consistant usage of the ''unit number'' part of beamline device names. The attached pages are divided into three sections. The first section is a brief summary for the general user. The second section is a more amplified description for those who need more detailed interpretations of device names. The third section contains a few notes for those who must generate device names for new components.
Date: July 12, 1984
Creator: Paterson, J. & Silva, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Modification of the code BEAMCORR, and some simulation results of the magnet and achromat misalignments for the SLC South Arc

Description: An important decision has been made regarding the correction scheme for the arcs leading to the adoption of the so called scheme I. In this scheme the beam position data are collected from single-plane x and y Beam Position Monitors (BPMs), which are placed in the drift spaces adjacent to the downstream D- and F-magnets correspondingly. Similarly, single-plane x and y correctors are used for moving the upstream end of the corresponding magnets. In the present simulation this scheme is used exclusively. The first order calculations performed by means of TRANSPORT appear to be unsatisfactory from the point of view of the beam spotsize at the interaction point (IP). In this note we describe the modification to our program BEAMCORR which employs second order calculations by means of the program TURTLE. We also present the results of the following simulations: (a) study of the effects of two different levels of magnet misalignment on the beam spotsize at IP, and comparison of the results with those obtained by means of the program DINGBAT; (b) study of disjoints between achromats (both the displacement of the adjacent ends and angular discontinuity between achromats).
Date: July 11, 1984
Creator: Shoaee, H. & Kheifets, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A technical and economic evaluation of thermal spallation drilling technology

Description: Thermal spallation of rock may be defined as a type of progressive rock failure caused by the creation of thermal stresses induced by a sudden application of heat from a high temperature source. This technology is applicable to only certain types of hard rock, such as dolomite, taconite, and granite. In 1981 and 1982, the deepest holes ever drilled by this process were drilled in granite to depths of 1086 feet and 425 feet respectively. Penetration rates at the bottom of the deeper hole reached a maximum of 100 ft/hr. Because of these high rates, considerable interest was generated concerning the use of this technology for the drilling of deep holes. Based on this interest, this study was undertaken to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of the technology in general. This methodology has been used for blasthole drilling, the cutting of chambers at the bottom of drilled holes, and the cutting of narrow grooves in rock. However, because of the very high temperatures generated by the flame jet and the application of the technology to only certain types of rock, other areas of use have been very limited. In this report, evaluation of the technology was performed by conceptually designing and costing a theoretical flame jet drilling rig. The design process reviews a number of different concepts of the various components needed, and then chooses those pieces of equipment that best suit the needs of the system and have the best chance of being properly developed. The final concept consists of a flexible umbilical hose containing several internal hoses for carrying the various required fluids. An evaluation of this system was then made to determine its operational characteristics. The drilling capabilities and the economics of this rig were then compared to a conventional rotary drilling rig by theoretically drilling …
Date: July 10, 1984
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Composite-bed reactor for upgrading coal-derived liquids. Quarterly report No. 3, April 1-June 30, 1984

Description: Five experimental runs were conducted as a part of the temperature and catalyst zoned concept. These experiments were conducted at 10.3 MPa (1500 psig), with the bottom zone reactor at 400/sup 0/C (752/sup 0/F), LHST of 1.9 h, with 20% (wt) of the catalyst in the top zone and utilizing a variable temperature in the top zone 400 to 500/sup 0/C (752 to 932/sup 0/F). Excessive reactor plugging occurred when the top zone was operated at 500/sup 0/C (932/sup 0/F). This suggests an upper limit when utilizing the feedstock of 15% (wt) mixture of SRC in a coal liquefaction process solvent, and with a commercial grade catalyst, Armak KF-153-S, a Ni-Mo type. All temperature zoning combinations showed a loss in catalyst activation over the experimental run durations of 72 h. Activity loss was rapid in the first 30 to 40 h and gradual thereafter. This activity loss was caused by carbonaceous material and metals deposition. Increasing the top zone temperature from 400 (752/sup 0/F) to 450/sup 0/C (842/sup 0/F) provided a beneficial effect on HDN and HDM activity. A further temperature increase was detrimental because of excessive coking and possible thermodynamic equilibrium limitations. The one reference run that was conducted for the catalyst zone study utilized 400/sup 0/C (752/sup 0/F) in both zones, the same feedstock, catalyst, and operational conditions as reported above. Sample analyses are not yet completed. 7 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.
Date: July 9, 1984
Creator: Crynes, B.L. & Seapan, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Improved seal for geothermal drill bit. Final technical report

Description: Each of the two field test bits showed some promise though their performances were less than commercially acceptable. The Ohio test bit ran just over 3000 feet where about 4000 is considered a good run but it was noted that a Varel bit of the same type having a standard O ring seal was completely worn out after 8-1/2 hours (1750 feet drilled). The Texas test bit had good seal-bearing life but was the wrong cutting structure type for the formation being drilled and the penetration rate was low.
Date: July 6, 1984
Creator: Evans, R.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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