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[Memorandum: AIDS ARMS Network]

Description: A memorandum from Buck Buckingham at the AIDS ARMS Network to some of Network's partners discussing improvements to the organizations case management services for peoples with HIV/AIDS.
Date: April 25, 1988
Creator: AIDS ARMS Network
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Pattern of Thermal Fluctuations in a Recovery Boiler Floor

Description: The floor of a black liquor recovey boiler at a mill in central Canada has experienced cracking and delamination of the composite tubing near the spout wall and deformation of the floor panels that is most severe in the vicinity of the spout wall. One possible explanation for the observed damage is impacts of salt cake falling from the convective section onto the floor. In order to determine if such impacts do occur, strain gauges and thermocouples were installed on the boiler floor in areas where cracking and deformation were most frequent. The data obtained from these instruments indicate that brief, sudden temperature fluctuations do occur, and changes in the strain experienced by the affected tube occur simultaneously. These fluctuations appear to occur less often along the spout wall and more frequently with increasing distance from the wall. The frequency of these temperature fluctuations is insufficient for thermal fatigue to be the sole cause of the cracking observed on the tubes, but the data are consistent with what might be expected from pieces of falling salt cake.
Date: April 25, 1999
Creator: Abdullah, Z.; Gorog, J. P.; Keiser, J. R.; Meyers, L. E. & Swindeman, R. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

[RE: Regional Institute Directors' Forum, April 25, 1995]

Description: Photocopy of a letter from Julie Abel, Getty Center for Education in the Arts, to Professional Development Program Directors. In regards to the Regional Institute Directors' Forum on the Internet that they had participated in. Copied on the letter is Leilani Lattin Duke, Vicki Rosenberg, Brent Wilson, David Pankratz and Blanche Rubin.
Date: April 25, 1995
Creator: Abel, Julie
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Damage Accumulation in MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Yttria-Stabilized ZrO{sub 2} by Xe-Ion Irradiation

Description: Magnesium-aluminate spinel (MAS) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) are being considered for use as ceramic matrices in proliferation resistant fuels and radioactive storage systems, and may be used either as individual entities or as constituents in multicomponent ceramic systems. It is worthwhile, therefore, to compare radiation damage in these two potentially important materials when subjected to similar irradiation conditions, e.g., ion beam irradiation. To compare radiation damage properties of these two materials, single crystals of spinel and zirconia were irradiated with 340 keV Xe{sup ++} ions at 120 K, and subsequently investigated by Rutherford backscattering and ion channeling (RBS/C), and optical absorption spectroscopy. Results indicate that damage accumulation in both spinel and zirconia follow a three stage process: (1) very slow damage accumulation over a wide range of dose; (2) rapid changes in damage over a range of doses from about 0.25 to 25 displacements per atom (DPA); (3) slower damage accumulation at very high doses and possibly saturation. Optical absorption results indicate that F-centers form in Xe ion-irradiated spinel and that the concentration of these centers saturates at high dose. Absorption bands are also formed in both spinel and zirconia that are due to point defect complexes formed upon irradiation. These bands increase in intensity with increasing Xe dose, and, in the case of zirconia, without saturation. Finally the rate of change in intensity of these bands with increasing Xe dose, mimic the changes in damage observed by RBS/C with increasing dose.
Date: April 25, 1999
Creator: Afanasyev-Charkin, I.V.; Gritsyna, V.T.; Cooke, D.W.; Bennett, B.L. & Sickafus, K.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
captions transcript

Video Message Congratulating LEAP-II Graduating Students

Description: On May 4, 2018, a recognition ceremony was held for the LEAP (Library Education for the U.S. Affiliated Pacific) II scholars, who earned their Master's in Library Science degree from UNT. Video messages were sent to the students by their UNT professors who taught them at the Institutes in Hawaii. This short video recording is from Dr. Daniel Alemneh, congratulating the LAEP-II students who now join the graduates from the LEAP I cohort as the only indigenous librarians in the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands.
Date: April 25, 2018
Duration: 1 minute 54 seconds
Creator: Alemneh, Daniel Gelaw
Partner: UNT Libraries

Ensemble: 2006-04-25 - UNT Flute Choir

Description: Flute choir concert performed at the UNT College of Music Recital Hall
Access: Restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: April 25, 2006
Duration: 33 minutes 20 seconds
Creator: Alfaro, Rita; Bae, Yeoran; Brady, Katelyn; Culross, Christopher; Kitelinger, Jennifer; Ko, So-Yeon et al.
Partner: UNT Music Library
open access

Can Cavitation Be Anticipated?

Description: The major problem with cavitation in pumps and hydraulic systems is that there is no effective (conventional) method for detecting or predicting its inception. The traditional method of recognizing cavitation in a pump is to declare the event occurring when the total head drops by some arbitrary value (typically 3%) in response to a pressure reduction at the pump inlet. However, the device is already seriously cavitating when this happens. What is actually needed is a practical method to detect impending rather than incipient cavitation. Whereas the detection of incipient cavitation requires the detection of features just after cavitation starts, the anticipation of cavitation requires the detection and identification of precursor features just before it begins. Two recent advances that make this detection possible. The first is acoustic sensors with a bandwidth of 1 MHz and a dynamic range of 80 dB that preserve the fine details of the features when subjected to coarse vibrations. The second is the application of Bayesian parameter estimation which makes it possible to separate weak signals, such as those present in cavitation precursors, from strong signals, such as pump vibration. Bayesian parameter estimation derives a model based on cavitation hydrodynamics and produces a figure of merit of how well it fits the acquired data. Applying this model to an anticipatory engine should lead to a reliable method of anticipating cavitation before it occurs. This paper reports the findings of precursor features using high-performance sensors and Bayesian analysis of weak acoustic emissions in the 100-1000kHz band from an experimental flow loop.
Date: April 25, 1999
Creator: Allgood, G. O.; Dress, W. B.; Hylton, J. O. & Kercel, S. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

DISTRIBUTION COEFICIENTS (KD) GENERATED FROM A CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY

Description: Core samples originating from Vault 4, Cell E of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) were collected in September of 2008 (Hansen and Crawford 2009, Smith 2008) and sent to SRNL to measure chemical and physical properties of the material including visual uniformity, mineralogy, microstructure, density, porosity, distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), and chemical composition. Some data from these experiments have been reported (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). In this study, leaching experiments were conducted with a single core sample under conditions that are representative of saltstone performance. In separate experiments, reducing and oxidizing environments were targeted to obtain solubility and Kd values from the measurable species identified in the solid and aqueous leachate. This study was designed to provide insight into how readily species immobilized in saltstone will leach from the saltstone under oxidizing conditions simulating the edge of a saltstone monolith and under reducing conditions, targeting conditions within the saltstone monolith. Core samples were taken from saltstone poured in December of 2007 giving a cure time of nine months in the cell and a total of thirty months before leaching experiments began in June 2010. The saltstone from Vault 4, Cell E is comprised of blast furnace slag, class F fly ash, portland cement, and Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) Batch 2 salt solution. The salt solution was previously analyzed from a sample of Tank 50 salt solution and characterized in the 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) report (Zeigler and Bibler 2009). Subsequent to Tank 50 analysis, additional solution was added to the tank solution from the Effluent Treatment Project as well as from inleakage from Tank 50 pump bearings (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). Core samples were taken from three locations and at three depths at each location using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit (1-1, 1-2, 1-3; 2-1, 2-2, 2-3; …
Date: April 25, 2011
Creator: Almond, P. & Kaplan, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

THE Epsilon*/Lambda BRANCHING RATIO OF Y*1

Description: Recently a T = 1 resonance in the {Lambda}{pi} system called Y*{sub 1} has been observed with a mass of 1385 Mev. Two types of resonances have been predicted that might relate this observation to other elementary-particle interactions: (1) P 3/2 resonances in the {Lambda}{pi} and {Sigma}{pi} systems predicted by global symmetry corresponding to the (3/2, 3/2) resonance of the {pi}N system; (2) a spin-1/2 Y-{pi} resonance resulting from a bound state in the KN system. The position and width of the observed Y*{sub 1} resonance agree with both theories, but since the spin and parity have not yet been determined, it is impossible at present to distinguish between the two theoretical interpretations.
Date: April 25, 1961
Creator: Alston, Margaret H.; Alvarez, Luis W.; Eberhard, Philippe; Good,Myron L.; Graziano, William; Ticho, Harold K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Automated DNA Sequencing System

Description: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.
Date: April 25, 1999
Creator: Armstrong, G. A.; Ekkebus, C. P.; Hauser, L. J.; Kress, R. L. & Mural, R. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Health and safety guide for inorganic compounds and metals used in the fabrication of superconductive alloys

Description: This health and safety guide was written to satisfy two objectives: to summarize the toxicity of metals and alloys used in superconductivity for the benefit of those who work with these materials, and to summarize and describes the basic principles of a highly technical field from a health and safety point-of-view for the benefit of health professionals. The guide begins with a profile of the superconductivity industry, including a list of current and potential applications, a literature review of the market potential, and summary of the current industry status. The body of the paper provides a toxicity and hazard summary for 50 metals, alloys and metal oxides used in superconductivity. The toxicity and hazard summary for all 50 compounds includes: occupational exposure limits, explosiveness and flammability potential, LD{sub 50}'s, chemical and physical properties, incompatibilities and reactivities, recommended personal protective equipment, symptoms of acute and chronic exposure, target organs and toxic effects, and steps for emergency first aid. Finally, a discussion of general occupational hygiene principles is provided, with emphasis on how these principles apply to the unique field of superconductivity. 41 refs.
Date: April 25, 1990
Creator: Arnold, S. D. & Talley, G. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Toward automating the database design process

Description: One organization's approach to designing complex, interrelated databases is described. The problems encountered and the techniques developed are discussed. A set of software tools to aid the designer and to produce an initial database design directly is presented. 5 figures.
Date: April 25, 1979
Creator: Asprey, P.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Improved Measurement of CP Violation in Neutral BDecays to \ccbar s

Description: The authors present updated measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in fully-reconstructed neutral B decays to several CP eigenstates containing a charmonium meson. The measurements use a data sample of (383 {+-} 4) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. They determine sin2{beta} = 0.714 {+-} 0.032(stat) {+-} 0.018(syst) and |{lambda}| = 0.952 {+-} 0.022(stat) {+-} 0.017(syst).
Date: April 25, 2007
Creator: Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Measurement of Decay Amplitudes of B to (ccbar) K^* withan Angular Analysis, for (ccbar)=J/Psi,Psi(2S) and Chi_c1

Description: The authors perform the first three-dimensional measurement of the amplitudes of B {yields} {psi}(2S)K* and B {yields} {chi}{sub c1}K* decays and update the previous measurement B {yields} J/{psi}K*. They use a data sample collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring, corresponding to 232 million B{bar B} pairs. The longitudinal polarization of decays involving a J{sup PC} = 1{sup ++} {chi}{sub c1} meson is found to be larger than that with a 1{sup --} J/{psi} or {psi}(2S) meson. No direct CP-violating charge asymmetry is observed.
Date: April 25, 2007
Creator: Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Measurement of the Absolute Branching Fraction of D0 to K- pi+

Description: The authors measure the absolute branching fraction for D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} using partial reconstruction of {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}X{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays, in which only the charged lepton and the pion from the decay D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} are used. Based on a data sample of 230 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, they obtain {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (4.007 {+-} 0.037 {+-} 0.070)%, where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.
Date: April 25, 2007
Creator: Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Discretionary Budget Authority by Subfunction: An Overview

Description: This report presents figures showing trends in discretionary budget authority as a percentage of GDP by subfunction within each of 17 budget function categories, using data from President Obama's FY2014 budget submission. The report also provides a graphical overview of historical trends in discretionary budget authority from FY1976 through FY2012, preliminary estimates for FY2013 spending, and the levels consistent with the President's proposals for FY2014 through FY2018.
Date: April 25, 2013
Creator: Austin, D. Andrew
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Flooding and mass transfer in Goodloe-packed columns, Part 2. [HTGR]

Description: Krypton gas is recovered from HTGR off-gas streams by countercurrent absorption in liquid carbon dioxide. Goodloe stainless steel wire mesh packing was chosen for the absorption columns since the process operates at -20/sup 0/C and about 20 atm pressure. Flooding points and an overall mass transfer coefficient for Goodloe-packed columns were determined with a carbon dioxide-air-water system for 6.4 and 15.2-cm-ID columns. Flood points were obtained for liquid-to-gas mass velocity ratios of 20 to 800. A mixing model, assuming plug flow for the gas and dispersed flow for the liquid, was used to calculate an overall mass transfer coefficient, K/sub L/a. K/sub L/a, based on mass concentrations, ranged from 0.01 to 0.08 sec/sup -T/ and was found to increase with increasing liquid flow rate.
Date: April 25, 1977
Creator: Ayala, J. S.; Brian, B. W. & Sharon, A. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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