Search Results

0. 4 mm Interferometer System Using Dielectric Waveguide

Description: A 0.4 mm submillimeter-wave, phase-modulated polarimeter/interferometer is used for simultaneous time-dependent measurement of line-averaged electron density and poloidal field-induced Faraday rotation along chords of the plasma column in ISX-B tokamak. Heterodyna detection and hollow dielectric waveguide are utilized to achieve the high sensitivity required for the multichord equipment.
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Hutchinson, D. P.; Ma, C. H.; Staats, P. A. & Vander Sluis, K. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

0. 9 a Gev /sup 238/U on /sup 238/U collisions in the LBL streamer chamber. Appendix A

Description: Charged particle exclusive data for high multiplicity U on U events are reported. Analyses are based on comparison with Cugnon's intranuclear cascade model, and the explosion-evaporation simulation of Fai and Randrup. The azimuthal structure of the observed events shows evidence of collective flow. The widely used flow angle methodology proves to be relatively insensitive to collective effects under the conditions of the present experiment. An isotropic pattern of ejectile emission is not reached at maximum multiplicity. 18 refs., 4 figs.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Fung, S.Y.; Beavis, D.; Gorn, W.; Keane, D.; Liu, Y.M.; Poe, R.T. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

0/sup -/ to 0/sup +/ beta decay in A = 16

Description: Techniques and results of the measurement of the beta-decay rate of the first excited state of /sup 16/N to the ground state of /sup 16/O are reported. Energy levels involved in the decay are shown, and the /sup 16/N 0/sup -/ beta decay branching ration is given. (WHK)
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Gagliardi, C.; Garvey, G.T.; Wrobel, J.R. & Freedman, S.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A 1. 5--4 Kelvin detachable cold-sample transfer system: Application to inertially confined fusion with spin-polarized hydrogens fuels

Description: A compact cold-transfer apparatus for engaging and retrieving samples at liquid helium temperatures (1.5--4K), maintaining the samples at such temperatures for periods of hours, and subsequently inserting them in diverse apparatuses followed by disengagement, is described. The properties of several thermal radiation-insulating shrouds, necessary for very low sample temperatures, are presented. The immediate intended application is transportable target-shells containing highly spin-polarized deuterons in solid HD or D{sub 2} for inertially confined fusion (ICF) experiments. The system is also valuable for unpolarized high-density fusion fuels, as well as for other applications which are discussed. 9 refs., 6 figs.
Date: January 1, 1990
Creator: Alexander, N.; Barden, J.; Fan, Q. & Honig, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1. 5 GeV/c multiturn shaving extraction and its transport line for the Brookhaven AGS

Description: A system for fast shaving extraction at 1.5 GeV/c is implemented to extract the circulating beam in five turns. A numerical simulation is first carried out to determine the emittance and the rf structure of the extracted beam. This is followed by several machine study sessions which establish the optimal extraction configuration, confirm the emittance, and modify the transport line for low energy beam. Finally, a one-week run for the Neutrino Oscillation experiment demonstrates that the system is very stable and capable of delivering 7.5 x 10/sup 12/ p/sec with 70% extraction efficiency and 95% transport efficiency.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Weng, W. T.; Blumberg, L. N.; Gill, E.; Soukas, A.; Witkover, R. L.; Egleman, E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1/12-scale physical modeling experiments in support of tank 241-SY- 101 hydrogen mitigation

Description: Hanford tank 241-SY-101 is a 75-ft-dia double-shell tank that contains approximately 1.1 M gal of radioactive fuel reprocessing waste. Core samples have shown that the tank contents are separated into two main layers, a article laden supernatant liquid at the top of the tank and a more dense slurry on the bottom. Two additional layers may be present, one being a potentially thick sludge lying beneath the slurry at the bottom of the tank and the other being the crust that has formed on the surface of the supernatant liquid. The supernatant is more commonly referred to as the convective layer and the slurry as the non-convective layer. Accumulation of gas (partly hydrogen) in the non-convective layer is suspected to be the key mechanism behind the gas burp phenomena, and several mitigation schemes are being developed to encourage a more uniform gas release rate (Benegas 1992). To support the full-scale hydraulic mitigation test, scaled experiments were performed to satisfy two objectives: 1. provide an experimental database for numerical- model validation; 2. establish operating parameter values required to mobilize the settled solids and maintain the solids in suspension.
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: Fort, J. A.; Bamberger, J. A.; Bates, J. M.; Enderlin, C. W. & Elmore, M. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1/12-scale physical modeling experiments in support of tank 241-SY- 101 hydrogen mitigation. Final report

Description: Hanford tank 241-SY-101 is a 75-ft-dia double-shell tank that contains approximately 1.1 M gal of radioactive fuel reprocessing waste. Core samples have shown that the tank contents are separated into two main layers, a article laden supernatant liquid at the top of the tank and a more dense slurry on the bottom. Two additional layers may be present, one being a potentially thick sludge lying beneath the slurry at the bottom of the tank and the other being the crust that has formed on the surface of the supernatant liquid. The supernatant is more commonly referred to as the convective layer and the slurry as the non-convective layer. Accumulation of gas (partly hydrogen) in the non-convective layer is suspected to be the key mechanism behind the gas burp phenomena, and several mitigation schemes are being developed to encourage a more uniform gas release rate (Benegas 1992). To support the full-scale hydraulic mitigation test, scaled experiments were performed to satisfy two objectives: 1. provide an experimental database for numerical- model validation; 2. establish operating parameter values required to mobilize the settled solids and maintain the solids in suspension.
Date: January 1993
Creator: Fort, J. A.; Bamberger, J. A.; Bates, J. M.; Enderlin, C. W. & Elmore, M. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1.5D Quasilinear Model for Alpha Particle-TAE Interaction in ARIES ACT-I

Description: We study the TAE interaction with alpha particle fusion products in ARIES ACT-I using the 1.5D quasilinear model. 1.5D uses linear analytic expressions for growth and damping rates of TAE modes evaluated using TRANSP pro les to calculates the relaxation of pressure pro les. NOVA- K simulations are conducted to validate the analytic dependancies of the rates, and to normalize their absolute value. The low dimensionality of the model permits calculating loss diagrams in large parameter spaces.
Date: January 30, 2013
Creator: Ghantous, K.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Kessel, C. & Poli, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1-D closure models for slender 3-D viscoelastic free jets: von Karman flow geometry and elliptical cross section

Description: In this paper we derive one space dimensional, reduced systems of equations (1-D closure models) for viscoelastic free jets. We begin with the three-dimensional system of conservation laws and a Maxwell-Jeffreys constitutive law for an incompressible viscoelastic fluid. First, we exhibit exact truncations to a finite, closed system of 1-D equations based on classical velocity assumptions of von Karman. Next, we demonstrate that the 3-D free surface boundary conditions overconstrain these truncated systems, so that only a very limited class of solutions exist. We then proceed to derive approximate 1-D closure theories through a slender jet asymptotic scaling, combined with appropriate definitions of velocity, pressure and stress unknowns. Our nonaxisymmetric 1-D slender jet models incorporate the physical effects of inertia, viscoelasticity (viscosity, relaxation and retardation), gravity, surface tension, and properties of the ambient fluid, and include shear stresses and time dependence. Previous special 1-D slender jet models correspond to the lowest order equations in the present asymptotic theory by an a posteriori suppression to leading order of some of these effects, and a reduction to axisymmetry. Solutions of the lowest order system of equations in this asymptotic analysis are presented: For the special cases of elliptical inviscid and Newtonian free jets, subject to the effects of surface tension and gravity, our model predicts oscillation of the major axis of the free surface elliptical cross section between perpendicular directions with distance down the jet, and drawdown of the cross section, in agreement with observed behavior. 15 refs.
Date: January 1, 1988
Creator: Bechtel, S. E.; Forest, M. G.; Holm, D. D. & Lin, K. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1-D hybrid code for FRM start-up

Description: A one-D hybrid has been developed to study the start-up of the FRM via neutral-beam injection. The code uses a multi-group numerical model originally developed by J. Willenberg to describe fusion product dynamics in a solenoidal plasma. Earlier we described such a model for use in determining self-consistent ion currents and magnetic fields in FRM start-up. However, consideration of electron dynamics during start-up indicate that the electron current will oppose the injected ion current and may even foil the attempt to achieve reversal. For this reason, we have combined the multi-group ion (model) with a fluid treatment for electron dynamics to form the hybrid code FROST (Field Reversed One-dimensional STart-up). The details of this merger, along with sample results of operation of FROST, are given.
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Stark, R.A. & Miley, G.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A 1-D model for highly sensitive tubular reactors

Description: We consider the steady state operation of wall-cooled, fixed-bed tubular reactors. In these reactors the temperature rise ..delta..T must normally be limited to small fractions of the adiabatic temperature rise ..delta..T/sub ad/, both to avoid runaway and maintain product selectivity. Yet ..delta..T/..delta..T/sub ad/ << 1 can only occur if eta = t/sub dif//t/sub reac/ << 1, where t/sub dif/ is the timescale on which heat escapes the reactor by ''diffusing'' to the cooled walls, and t/sub reac/ is the timescale over which the reaction occurs. So here we use asymptotic methods based on eta << 1 to analyze the 2-d reactor equations, and find the radial concentration and temperature profiles to leading order in eta. We then obtain a 1-d model of the reactor by substituting these asymptotically correct profiles into the reactor equations and averaging over r. This model, the ..cap alpha..-model, is identical to the standard (Beek and Singer) 1-d model, except that the reactor's overall heat transfer coefficient U is a decreasing function of the temperature rise ..delta..T. This occurs because as ..delta..T increases, the reaction becomes increasingly concentrated near r = 0, causing a decreased heat transfer efficiency through the reactor's walls. By comparing it with numerical solutions of the original 2-d reactor equations, we find that the ..cap alpha..-model simulates the 2-d equations very accurately, even for highly sensitive reactors operated near runaway. We also find that a runaway criterion derived from the ..cap alpha..-model predicts the runaway transition of the original 2-d equations accurately, especially for highly sensitive reactors. 19 refs.
Date: January 1, 1987
Creator: Hagan, P. S.; Herskowitz, M. & Pirkle, J. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1 - FFTF-LMFBR seal test program, July-Septeember 1974

Description: The objectives of the general seal test program are to: (1) conduct static and dynamic tests to demonstrate or determine the mechanical performance of full-size (cross-section) FFTF fuel transfer machine and reactor vessel head seals intended for use in a sodium vapor - inert gas environment, (2) demonstrate that these FFTF seals or new seal configurations provide acceptable fission product and cover gas retention capabilities at Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) operating environmental conditions other than radiation, (3) develop improved seals and seal technology for the CRBRP to support the national objective to reduce all atmospheric contaminations to low levels, and (4) publish a Design Guide for reactor seals along with Ordering Data. Test results for the quarter are presented.
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: Kurzeka, W. & Oliva, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

S-1 project. Volume I. Architecture. 1979 annual report

Description: The US Navy is one of the world's largest users of digital computing equipment having a procurement cost of at least $50,000, and is the single largest such computer customer in the Department of Defense. Its projected acquisition plan for embedded computer systems during the first half of the 80s contemplates the installation of over 10,000 such systems at an estimated cost of several billions of dollars. This expenditure, though large, is dwarfed by the 85 billion dollars which DOD is projected to spend during the next half-decade on computer software, the near-majority of which will be spent by the Navy; the life-cycle costs of the 700,000+ lines of software for a single large Navy weapons systems application (e.g., AEGIS) have been conservatively estimated at most of a billion dollars. The S-1 Project is dedicated to realizing potentially large improvements in the efficiency with which such very large sums may be spent, so that greater military effectiveness may be secured earlier, and with smaller expenditures. The fundamental objectives of the S-1 Project's work are first to enable the Navy to be able to quickly, reliably and inexpensively evaluate at any time what is available from the state-of-the-art in digital processing systems and what the relevance of such systems may be to Navy data processing applications: and second to provide reference prototype systems to support possible competitive procurement action leading to deployment of such systems.
Date: January 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

S-1 project. Volume II. Hardware. 1979 annual report

Description: This volume includes highlights of the design of the Mark IIA uniprocessor (SMI-2), and the SCALD II user's manual. SCALD (structured computer-aided logic design system) cuts the cost and time required to design logic by letting the logic designer express ideas as naturally as possible, and by eliminating as many errors as possible - through consistency checking, simulation, and timing verification - before the hardware is built. (GHT)
Date: January 1, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1-/sup 11/C-D-glucose and related compounds

Description: The novel compounds 1-/sup 11/C-D-glucose, 1-/sup 11/C-D-mannose, 1-/sup 11/C-D-galactose, 2-/sup 11/C-D-glucose, 2-/sup 11/C-D-mannose and 2-/sup 11/C-D-galactose which can be used in nuclear medicine to monitor the metabolism of glucose and galactose can be rapidly prepared by reaction of the appropriate aldose substrate with an alkali metal /sup 11/C-labeled cyanide followed by reduction with a Raney alloy in formic acid.
Date: January 26, 1982
Creator: Shiue, Chyng-Yann & Wolf, Alfred P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1 to 12 GeV/c beam transport for transverse or longitudinally polarized protons

Description: A two-stage beam transport for polarized protons has been constructed and operated at the Argonne ZGS. The first stage delivers vertically polarized protons (N-type) to an elastic scattering polarimeter consisting of a 10 cm long LH/sub 2/ target and two moveable sets of forward and recoil scintillation counters. The unscattered protons transported through the beam's second stage are focused onto the polarized proton target PPT-III; this target utilizes a 2.5 T R and A magnet to produce target polarizations in the horizontal plane, either in the beam direction (L-type) or transverse to it (S-type). The second stage of the beam is equipped with a combination of superconducting solenoids and dipole magnets; thus the beam polarization can also be rotated to point in the L or S direction. The entire system has been operated successfully over the momentum range 1.0 to 11.75 GeV/c with NS, LS, SS, and LL beam target spin directions.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Colton, E. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2. 5 MeV neutron source for fission cross section measurement

Description: A 2.5 MeV neutron source has been established on the beamline of a 100 kV, 0.5 ma ion accelerator. The ion accelerator provides a 100 kV deuteron beam of about 200 ..mu..a into a 3 mm beam spot at the target position. The neutron source is produced by the D(d,n)/sup 3/He reaction with a yield of about 10/sup 7/ n/sec. The time-correlated associated particle method (TCAP) is utilized for the neutron fluence determination and for neutron background elimination. The /sup 3/He associated particles are detected at 90 degrees behind a thin aluminum foil and the corresponding neutrons are emitted at 73.5 degrees with an energy near 2.5 MeV. Also, the protons from the competing D(d,p)T reaction are monitored at 135 degrees for normalization and diagnostic purposes. A fission chamber containing six uranium tetrafluoride deposits has been designed for use in the /sup 235/U(n,f) cross section measurement at 2.5 MeV. The 5 cm diameter deposits range in thickness from 230--300 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ and are expected to have good uniformity. A description of the 2.5 MeV neutron source facility is presented along with details of the associated particle detection and neutron beam characteristics. Preparations for the fission cross section measurement are discussed. 6 refs., 4 figs.
Date: January 1, 1988
Creator: Duvall,, K.C.; Wasson, O.A. & Ma, Honchang
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2. 05 x 10/sup 9/ age of the Oklo uranium deposit

Description: U and Pb isotopic data on samples (10 to 100 gram) 2 to 10 m away from the borders of the Oklo reactor zones indicate a primary age of 2.05 x 10/sup 9/ years for the Oklo deposit and a secondary age of 0.375 x 10/sup 9/ years. All samples show effects of Pb loss; the average loss is 50 percent. Both the U--Pb and Pb isotopic data are consistent with a model of a primary 2.05 x 10/sup 9/ year age of the deposit, continuous volume diffusion of Pb from uraninite, and either continuous or recent loss of this Pb. In this case the 0.375 x 10/sup 9/ year age is an artifact without time significance. Using an average value of D/a/sup 2/ 3.5 x 10/sup -11/ a/sup -1/ (Cowan, this conference) this model explains the apparent 1.8 x 10/sup 9/ year Pb age observed by other workers. From the /sup 208/Pb//sup 206/Pb data the average U/Th value calculated for the Oklo deposit is approximately 100.
Date: January 1, 1977
Creator: Gancarz, A. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2. 6/sup 0/K refrigeration system for CBA magnet testing

Description: The superconducting magnets for the accelerator's rings will be cooled by a forced flow supercritical helium system from a central refrigeration plant. The design temperature for these magnets varies from 2.6 to 3.8/sup 0/K depending on a magnet's location in the ring. This paper describes the forced flow cooling system for testing a prototype magnet near 2.6/sup 0/K; this lowest temperature being of special interest to evaluate magnet quench protection. The test forced flow cooling system uses a three-stage approach, including an ejector pumped bath, similar to a cycle described previously. The coolant exists at 3.8/sup 0/K from these first stages and is then cooled further in a 64 cm diameter by 3 m high shielded liquid helium dewar. The supercritical helium gas passes through a submerged copper coil in this bath which is pumped to a pressure of 65 mm absolute by a screw compressor system. Temperatures are measured by thermistors located in the gas stream, and also embedded in the magnet coil.
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Bamberger, Joseph A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2-D and 3-D computations of curved accelerator magnets

Description: In order to save computer memory, a long accelerator magnet may be computed by treating the long central region and the end regions separately. The dipole magnets for the injector synchrotron of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), employ magnet iron consisting of parallel laminations, stacked with a uniform radius of curvature of 33.379 m. Laplace's equation for the magnetic scalar potential has a different form for a straight magnet (x-y coordinates), a magnet with surfaces curved about a common center (r-{theta} coordinates), and a magnet with parallel laminations like the APS injector dipole. Yet pseudo 2-D computations for the three geometries give basically identical results, even for a much more strongly curved magnet. Hence 2-D (x-y) computations of the central region and 3-D computations of the end regions can be combined to determine the overall magnetic behavior of the magnets. 1 ref., 6 figs.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Turner, L.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2-D Eulerian hydrodynamics with fluid interfaces, self-gravity and rotation

Description: The purpose of this paper is to describe in detail the numerical approach we have developed over the past five years for solving 2-dimensional gas-dynamical problems in astrophysics involving inviscid compressible flow, self-gravitation, rotation, and fluid instabilities of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz types. The computer code to be described has been applied most recently to modeling jets in radio galaxies (Norman et al. 1981, 1982) and is an outgrowth of a code developed for studying rotating protostellar collapse (Norman, Wilson and Barton 1980; Norman 1980). This basic methodology draws heavily on the techniques and experience of James R. Wilson and James M. LeBlanc of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and thus the code is designed to be a general purpose 2-D Eulerian hydrocode, and is characterized by a high degree of simplicity, robustness, modularity and speed. Particular emphases of this article are: (1) the recent improvements to the code's accuracy through the use of vanLeer's (1977) monotonic advection algorithm, (2) a discussion of the importance of what we term consistent advection, and (3) a description of a numerical techique for modeling dynamic fluid interfaces in multidimensional Eulerian calculations developed by LeBlanc. 23 refs., 14 figs.
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Norman, M.L. & Winkler, K.H.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A 2-D Pore-Network Model of the Drying of Single-Component Liquids in Porous Media

Description: The drying of liquid-saturated porous media is typically approaching using macroscopic continuum models involving phenomenological coefficients. Insight on these coefficients can be obtained by a more fundamental study at the pore- and pore-network levels. In this report, a model based on pore-network representation of porous media that accounts for various process at the pore-scale is presented. These include mass transfer by advection and diffusion in the gas phase, viscous flow in liquid and gas phases and capillary effects at the gas-liquid menisci in the pore throats.
Date: January 20, 2000
Creator: Yortsos, Yanic C.; Yiotis, A. G.; Stubos, A. K. & Boundovis, A. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department