Search Results

open access

Analyses of Coals in the United States with Descriptions of Mine and Field Samples Collected between July 1, 1904 and June 30, 1910 Part 2. Descriptions of Samples

Description: From Introduction: "This volume contains the descriptions of the samples whose analyses are published in the preceding volume, Part I of this bulletin. The descriptions have been compiled from the notebooks of the persons who collected the samples, have been condensed from accounts given in published reports of the United States Geological Survey, or have furnished by the collection themselves. Inasmuch as the descriptions represent the work of many persons during a period of six years, and inasmuch as they were recorded under widely differing conditions, they necessarily vary in fullness detail."
Date: 1913
Creator: Lord, N. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Analyses of Coals in the United States with Descriptions of Mine and Field Samples Collected between July 1, 1904 and June 30, 1910: Part 1. -- Analyses

Description: From Significance and value of Analyses of Coal: "The analyses published in this report cover samples of coal collected in many different parts of the country with unusual care by experiences men, in such manner as to make them representative of extensive beds of coal."
Date: 1913
Creator: Lord, N. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

The Use of Faunal Remains for Identifying Shifts in Pit Structure Function in the Mesa Verde Region: a Case Study From Goodman Point

Description: The archaeofaunal remains left by the Ancestral Puebloan people of Goodman Point Unit provides a valuable, yet underutilized resource into pit structure function. This thesis explores temporal changes in pit structure use and evaluates if a final feast occurred during a kiva decommissioning. The results from zooarchaeological analyses of a pithouse and two great kivas suggest that changes in pit structures at Goodman Point mimic the regional trend toward specialization until late Pueblo III. Cross-cultural studies on feasts, southwest ethnographies and previous zooarchaeological work established methods for identifying a feast. The analysis of differences in faunal remains from a great kiva and multiple room block middens imply that the remains in the kiva were from a final feast prior to a decommissioning ceremony and were not fill. Spatially and temporally the great kiva appears to be a unique, specialized structure in the cultural development of the Goodman Point community.
Date: August 2015
Creator: Winstead, Christy
Partner: UNT Libraries
Back to Top of Screen