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[Campus aerial, North Texas State Normal College]

Description: Photograph of a photograph of the NTSNC campus from the air. Buildings that can be seen are the Main Building, the Education Building, the Hospital, the Power Plant, the Manual Arts Building, and the Library. On the right side of the image is Avenue A.The print is framed by tape and a note on the photograph reads "Air-plane view, North Texas State Normal College, Photograph Copyright 1919 by-Albert Addison."
Date: 1919
Creator: Addison, Albert
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

The Larger Corn Stalk-Borer

Description: This report discusses a pale, dark-spotted caterpillar known as the larger cornstalk-borer which bores into and weakens cornstalks. "Only corn is injured seriously by this insect; some of the larger grasses are food plants, and sugar cane sometimes is damaged slightly. This bulletin gives the life history of the insect, its feeding habits, and methods of combating it. There are two generations in a season, so greater vigilance is necessary. The second generation passes the winter only in the corn roots, so if these are destroyed or plowed under deeply, the pest will be largely decreased. The injury is worst where corn follows corn, so rotation of crops will help to destroy the pest." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Ainslie, George G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

The War with Germany: A Statistical Summary

Description: Book containing statistical figures regarding the United States of America's conflict with Germany during World War I, including statistics for casualties, expenditures, and ordnance. Index starts on page 151.
Date: 1919
Creator: Ayres, Leonard Porter, 1879-1946
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Conserving Corn From Weevils in the Gulf Coast States

Description: This report discusses the destructive impact of weevils on the corn crop in the southern United States and controls measures which farmers may find effective in reducing their losses to this pest. Among the insects discussed are the Angoumois grain moth and the rice or "black" weevil.
Date: 1919
Creator: Back, E. A. (Ernest Adna), 1886-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

The Decline and Ultimate Production of Oil Wells, with Notes on the Valuation of Oil Properties

Description: From General Statement Purpose of the Report: "The present investigation was undertaken for the purpose of supplying some of the material so badly needed in the valuation and more efficient operation of oil properties. Because of the lack of time for further studies, the amount of data already accumulated and the policy of the Bureau of Mines of publishing as soon as possible any information that may be of use to an industry, the bulletin is issued now."
Date: 1919
Creator: Beal, Carl H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

The City Home Garden

Description: "Fresh vegetables for an average family may be grown upon a large back yard or city lot.... Thousands of acres of idle land that may be used for gardens are still available within the boundaries of our large cities. Some of the problems that confront the city gardener are more difficult than those connected with the farm garden, and it is the object of this bulletin to discuss these problems from a practical standpoint." -- p. 2. Soil preparation, tools, seeding, watering, diseases and pests, and space issues are all discussed and brief descriptions of several vegetables are given.
Date: 1919
Creator: Beattie, W. R. (William Renwick), b. 1870
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

The Eelworm Disease of Wheat and Its Control

Description: "The eelworm disease of wheat, long known in Europe, has been found during the past year causing considerable damage in Virginia and in isolated localities in West Virginia, Maryland, Georgia, and California. Every effort should be made to control the trouble in these infested regions, to prevent its further spread, and to find other localities where the disease may exist. The disease may be recognized on young and old plants and in the thrashed wheat by the descriptions given in this bulletin. The trouble may be controlled by use of clean seed, by crop rotation, and by sanitation. If clean seed cannot be procured from uninfested localities, diseased seed can be made safe for planting by the salt-brine treatment here described." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Byars, Luther P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

The European Corn Borer: A Menace to the Country's Corn Crop

Description: "The European corn borer probably is the most injurious plant pest that has yet been introduced into this country. It is now known to be present in an area of about 320 square miles near Boston, Massachusetts. Unless repressed and restricted it may be spread throughout the country and cause serious and widespread losses to the corn crop.... To suppress this pest burn or otherwise destroy during the fall, winter, or spring all cornstalks, corn stubble, crop remnants, and stalks of garden plants, weeds, or wild grasses within the infested areas likely to harbor the overwintering borers." -- p. 2. In addition to control measures, this bulletin also explains how to identify injuries caused by the corn borer and discusses its life cycle and habits.
Date: 1919
Creator: Caffrey, D. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Well Done Men]

Description: Postcard with a photograph of an airplane flying over the Statue of Liberty, addressed to Mrs. John H. Carper, at 818 Austin St., Houston, Texas. The postcard indicates that John H. Carper will be returning from service at Camp Mills and he'll write home as soon as possible.
Date: May 23, 1919
Creator: Carper, John H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Control of the Onion Thrips

Description: "The onion thrips, a minute, prolific insect almost invisible to the unaided eye, is the most serious menace to the onion-growing industry throughout the whole United States.... The thrips preys upon cabbage, cauliflower, and similar plants, cucumber, melons, and other vine crops, and most other garden and truck crops, though it is more injurious to some than to others. It is injurious to roses and some other ornamentals and to greenhouse plants. It also breeds upon a large variety of weeds. Clean farming and proper crop rotation help to control the pest. Spraying with nicotine sulphate solutions has proved the most effective treatment. This bulletin gives directions for this work, with illustrations showing the outfits most effective under differing conditions." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Chittenden, F. H. (Frank Hurlbut), 1858-1929
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Striped Cucumber Beetle and Its Control

Description: "The striped cucumber beetle is the most important of all our cucumber insect pests and does serious damage to all forms of cucurbits. It is widely distributed east of the Rocky Mountains and is to be found in most fields and gardens.... To control this pest and reduce its ravages four methods are employed: Preventive measures, the use of repellent substances, spraying with arsenical insecticides, and good farm practice. These are described fully on pages 10 to 19 and summarized on page 20." -- p. 2.
Date: 1919
Creator: Chittenden, F. H. (Frank Hurlbut), 1858-1929
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Sweet-Potato Weevil and Its Control

Description: "Immense losses of sweet potatoes in the Gulf States are being caused by the sweet-potato weevil. This foreign pest, introduced into the United States years ago, has become very destructive recently and now threatens to invade all States in which sweet potatoes are grown. The slender, metallic-blue weevil, about a quarter of an inch long with red legs and 'waist,' attacks leaves, stems, and roots or 'tubers,' and its whitish larvae or grubs tunnel the stalks and roots and inflict great damage, both in the field and in storage. Owing to the increased production of the sweet-potato crop to meet war conditions, this weevil has become a pest of the greatest importance. Indeed, it is to the sweet-potato industry what the boll weevil is to cotton. This bulletin describes the insect and its injuries and gives a sufficient account of its life history to explain the control measures advised. The weevil can be stamped out in limited regions where it has not yet secured a firm foothold, and then, by quarantines, it can be kept out of States and parts of States not yet infested. It is vitally important at present to combat, by every means available, an insect that threatens to destroy our second most valuable vegetable crop." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Chittenden, F. H. (Frank Hurlbut), 1858-1929
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Approximate Quantitative Microscopy of Pulverized Ores, Including the Use of the Camera Lucida

Description: Technical paper issued by the Bureau of Mines over microscopy of pulverized ores. As stated in the introduction, "this paper, which deals with the study of pulverized ores and the use of the camera lucida in such work, discusses an investigation undertaken at the Seattle and the Golden mining experiment stations of the Bureau of Mines" (p. 3). This paper includes tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: October 1919
Creator: Coghill, Will H. & Bonardi, J. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Currants and Gooseberries

Description: "This bulletin gives information with regard to the essential features of currant and gooseberry culture, indicates the regions in which these plants may be grown, and points out certain restrictions on their culture due to insect pests and diseases.... The reader will find helpful suggestions regarding the selection of varieties of currants and gooseberries for planting, as well as recipes for making some widely popular fruit products." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1919
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Date: 1919
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Muscadine Grape Paste

Description: "Muscadine grape paste is an economical, appetizing, and nutritious sugar-saving substitute for candy and other confections. It is excellent in combination with cheese, and especially with cottage cheese, as a substitute for the salad course or for a dessert. It may be made from the fresh fruit or preferably from the pulp of pomace left from grape juice and jelly making. It may be made with grape sirup or corn sirup instead of sugar. The pulp may be canned and the paste made at any convenient time or when desired for use. The making of muscadine grape paste is recommended for home use, but it may be made profitably for market where grapes are abundant. This bulletin gives directions for securing suitable fruit, the extraction of the pulp, and the sweetening, cooking, drying, and storing of the product, as well as the making of various combinations, fancy pastes, and pastes from other fruits." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Dearing, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Commercial Comb-Honey Production

Description: This bulletin details the process for producing honey which is marketed in its original honeycomb and discusses the equipment needed, management of bees, and collection of the honeycombs.
Date: 1919
Creator: Demuth, Geo. S. (George S.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Sweet Clover on Corn Belt Farms

Description: "Sweet clover is now grown successfully on many farms in the corn belt, both in rotation and as a catch crop to be plowed under. It has proved excellent for hay and pasture, and is unequaled by any other legume for soil improvement. Sweet clover may be used to good advantage for silage, and on some farms, with proper management, it is a profitable seed crop. Mixed with bluegrass, it makes a pasture of nearly double the carrying capacity of bluegrass alone. The object of this bulletin is to present details of management and of the more important farm practices followed on some of the successful corn-belt farms on which sweet clover is grown as one of the principal crops of the rotation. Cropping systems are outlined for farms of different types, and special attention is called to the three essentials of success in growing the crop -- lime, inoculation, and scarified seed." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Drake, J. A. & Rundles, J. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Alfalfa on Corn-Belt Farms

Description: "Alfalfa, on Corn Belt farms, if introduced in any considerable acreage, requires a great amount of labor at the most critical stage of the cultivation of corn. This bulletin tells how the more successful Corn Belt growers fit alfalfa into their cropping systems without interfering seriously with labor schedules. This is done in the main by speeding up the haying operations and corn cultivation by the use of labor-saving implements and more efficient methods. To some extent, the use of alfalfa for pasture serves to reduce the labor difficulties. The methods of handling the alfalfa crop that have been worked out by some of the more experienced Corn Belt growers are illustrated by several concrete examples of good management. The material for this bulletin was obtained on 235 Corn Belt farms on which alfalfa is grown successfully." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Drake, J. A.; Rundles, J. C. & Jennings, R. D. (Ralph Dickieson), 1892-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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