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The Biological Behavior of Organic Compounds Containing Radiophosphorus

Description: The study was undertaken with the objective of observing the distribution in the rat of organic compounds of phosphorus labelled with the P32 isotope as tracer. The fate of several of these compounds was studied in animals bearing tumors. The distribution of inorganic phosphate in animal tissues is well known but was included in this work for comparison with the organic phosphorus compounds.
Date: April 25, 1952
Creator: Morrison, D. C. & Crowley, Josephine F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Review of the Corrosion Product Radioactivity Program at the Army Package Power Reactor : Alco R & D report

Description: Abstract: An analysis and a summary are.given of the radioactivity buildup program at the Army Package Power Reactor during the last nine months. · Due to the wide fluctuation of water and crud results, only general interpretations can be made with this data. Metal test coupon data indicate a substantially greater buildup on Croloy 16-1 metal than on Type 304 stainless steel. Coupled with the decreased ability to remove the radioactivity buildup on Croloy 16-1 by conventional descaling techniques, the implication is that this metal might pose a serious problem for use as steam generator material. It was emphasized, however, that results to date ae only preliminary and extensive additional experimentation would be required to reach more definite conclusions.
Date: April 25, 1958
Creator: Medin, A. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Theory of Asymmetric Arrays of Control Rods in Nuclear Reactors

Description: Introduction: Seldom does the actual arrangement of control elements in a nuclear reactor confers to the ideal and convenient mathematical array. In order to achieve shim control. safety and regulation, it is desirable to design with rods of different sizes and materials. With given fuel element arrangement, typically in square or hexagonal lattice spacing, there will be rods located at different distances form the center of the core and from each other. As the reactor operates, absorbers will be withdrawn, leaving further asymmetries in the location of those remaining. It is the purpose of this report to develop in detail a two-group diffusion theory with as complete generality as possible. The method is as yet restricted to the unreflected core, or to the reflected core by use of reflector savings and bare equivalent geometries.
Date: April 25, 1959
Creator: Murray, Raymond L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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DuPont Prototype Safety and Control Rod Drive Testing

Description: Summary: Prototype testing of the safety and control rod drives indicated that both units functioned properly. No major problems were encountered during testing. Seal leakage data collected indicated that the seal units were performing satisfactorily. Scram times during both cold and hot testing were excellent and actually better than expected.
Date: April 25, 1960
Creator: VandeMark, G. M. & Krause, P. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Mathematics Panel Quarterly Progress Report for the Period Ending January 31, 1952

Description: This progress report discusses new additions to the Mathematics Panel and discusses new and further work happening at Oak Ridge National Laboratory relating to the Mathematics Panel, of particular note is the Oak Ridge computer which is being fabricated at Argonne National Laboratory and the Technitrol Company.
Date: April 25, 1952
Creator: Householder, Alston S., (Alston Scott), 1904-1993 & Perry, C. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Experimental investigation of the trapping and energy loss mechanisms of intense relativistic electron rings in hydrogen gas and plasma

Description: The results of an experimental study on the trapping and energy loss mechanisms of intense, relativistic electron rings confined in Astron-like magnetic field geometries are presented. The work is subdivided into four sections: gas trapping; average ring electron energetics; plasma trapping, and hollow-beam cusp-injection into gas and plasma. The mechanisms by which the injected beam coalesces into a current ring in the existing Cornell RECE-Berta facility are considered. To investigate the nature of ring electron energy loss mechanisms following completion of the trapping process, a diagnostic was developed utilizing multi-foil X-ray absorption spectroscopy to analyze the Bremsstrahlung generated by the electrons as they impinge upon a thin tungsten wire target suspended in the circulating current. Finally, a set of preliminary experimental results is presented in which an annular electron beam was passed through a coaxial, non-adiabatic magnetic cusp located at one end of a magnetic mirror well.
Date: April 25, 1977
Creator: Smith, A. C. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Free-flow variability on the Jess and Souza Ranches, Altamont Pass

Description: A central monitoring computer was installed on each ranch. The computers were connected by communication cables to 50 turbines on the Souza Ranch and 150 turbines on the Jess Ranch. Anemometers were installed on every other turbine on 12-foot booms at 35 feet above ground level (AGL). Spacing between anemometers was approximately 200 feet in the crosswind direction by 500 feet in the parallel direction. A total of 23 turbines on the Souza Ranch was instrumented in this fashion, as well as two multi-level meteorological towers. On the Jess Ranch, 77 turbines were instrumented; about half at 35 feet AGL and half at 50 feet AGL, plus four additional towers. Wind data were collected for approximately a 100 hour period on each ranch. All turbines were shut down during these periods so that no turbine wakes would be present. The data periods were selected by the meteorologist to insure that they occurred during typical spring-summer flow regimes. The terrain features upwind of the site appear to play as significant a role in the flow variability as terrain features within the site.
Date: April 25, 1988
Creator: Nierenberg, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Design, operation, and initial results from capsule OC-1, the first of a series of graphite creep irradiation experiments. [HTGR]

Description: A series of 12 irradiation experiments was designed to evaluate the creep characteristics of graphites when exposed to elevated temperatures and high fast fluences. Various graphites of interest to HTGR designers are to be examined. The series encompasses the irradiation of 28 specimens, each 15.24 mm (0.6 in.) in diameter by 25.4 mm (1 in.) long, to incremental exposures of 1, 2, 4, and 8 E + 25 n/m/sup 2/ (E greater than 0.18 MeV) at 900/sup 0/C; 28 similar specimens to the same exposures at 600/sup 0/C; and 28 others at 1250/sup 0/C. A compressive stress of 13.79 MPa (2000 psi) is applied to 20 of the specimens in each test by means of a metal bellows, which is expanded by gas pressure against the specimen columns; 8 of the stacked specimens are stressed to 20.68 MPa (3000 psi) by a reduction in diameter. The report describes special features of the capsules, which include (1) movable centerline thermocouples to measure the temperature profile along the axes of the capsule, (2) special linear variable differential transformer-type load cells to monitor the applied load, and (3) a computerized temperature control system designed to provide accurate longitudinal temperatures over the 0.508-m (20-in.) length of the test specimen columns. Irradiation of capsule OC-1, the first test of this series, has been completed. The capsule was operated at a nominal specimen temperature of 900/sup 0/C in the E-5 core position of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor for approximately 1139 hr at 30 MW reactor power to a peak fluence of 1.3 E + 25 n/m/sup 2/ (E greater than 0.18 MeV). Operational characteristics of this experiment and some preliminary results are presented.
Date: April 25, 1977
Creator: Senn, R. L.; Conlin, J. A.; Cook, W. H. & Eatherly, W. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Geologic characteristics of a portion of the Salton Sea geothermal field

Description: The examination of drill cuttings and core samples from the Magmamax Nos. 2 and 3 and Woolsey No. 1 wells indicate that the sequence of sedimentary rocks in the Salton Sea geothermal field from the surface to below 4000 ft can be divided into three categories: cap rock, unaltered reservoir rocks, and hydrothermally altered reservoir rocks. The cap rock extends from the surface to a depth of approximately 1100 ft in all three wells. There is evidence to suggest that the cap rock has undergone self-sealing through time as a result of the circulation of hot brine through the rocks. Essentially unaltered reservoir rocks extend from a depth of 1100 ft to approximately 3000 ft. The mineralogical and textural changes that occur at depth can be attributed to the process of hydrothermal alteration. Alteration has occurred in a chemically open system and the important variables in the alteration scheme have been temperature, permeability, brine composition, and rock composition. The transition from unaltered to altered reservoir rocks is marked by the replacement of calcite by epidote. The first appearance of epidote correlates reasonably well with the top of the alteration zone as determined in other studies by electric log analysis. Biotite and chlorite, potential indicators of alteration zones, are considered to be of detrital origin rather than hydrothermal origin. The primary effect of hydrothermal alteration on the reservoir rocks in the Salton Sea geothermal field has been the reduction of porosity and permeability with depth. Petrographic analysis indicates that porosity and permeability in the field is enhanced by the presence of fractures in shales. The geologic picture that emerges from spontaneous potential (SP) log correlation is that of a structural basin whose axis lies to the northwest of Magmamax No. 2. The data suggest that unaltered reservoir rocks on the periphery …
Date: April 25, 1977
Creator: Tewhey, J. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Chattanooga shale: uranium recovery by in situ processing

Description: The increasing demand for uranium as reactor fuel requires the addition of sizable new domestic reserves. One of the largest potential sources of low-grade uranium ore is the Chattanooga shale--a formation in Tennessee and neighboring states that has not been mined conventionally because it is expensive and environmentally disadvantageous to do so. An in situ process, on the other hand, might be used to extract uranium from this formation without the attendant problems of conventional mining. We have suggested developing such a process, in which fracturing, retorting, and pressure leaching might be used to extract the uranium. The potential advantages of such a process are that capital investment would be reduced, handling and disposing of the ore would be avoided, and leaching reagents would be self-generated from air and water. If successful, the cost reductions from these factors could make the uranium produced competitive with that from other sources, and substantially increase domestic reserves. A technical program to evaluate the processing problems has been outlined and a conceptual model of the extraction process has been developed. Preliminary cost estimates have been made, although it is recognized that their validity depends on how successfully the various processing steps are carried out. In view of the preliminary nature of this survey (and our growing need for uranium), we have urged a more detailed study on the feasibility of in situ methods for extracting uranium from the Chattanooga shale.
Date: April 25, 1977
Creator: Jackson, D. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Flooding and mass transfer in Goodloe-packed columns, Part 2. [HTGR]

Description: Krypton gas is recovered from HTGR off-gas streams by countercurrent absorption in liquid carbon dioxide. Goodloe stainless steel wire mesh packing was chosen for the absorption columns since the process operates at -20/sup 0/C and about 20 atm pressure. Flooding points and an overall mass transfer coefficient for Goodloe-packed columns were determined with a carbon dioxide-air-water system for 6.4 and 15.2-cm-ID columns. Flood points were obtained for liquid-to-gas mass velocity ratios of 20 to 800. A mixing model, assuming plug flow for the gas and dispersed flow for the liquid, was used to calculate an overall mass transfer coefficient, K/sub L/a. K/sub L/a, based on mass concentrations, ranged from 0.01 to 0.08 sec/sup -T/ and was found to increase with increasing liquid flow rate.
Date: April 25, 1977
Creator: Ayala, J. S.; Brian, B. W. & Sharon, A. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Second quarterly progress report, August 1, 1976--October 31, 1976

Description: This report investigates the application of the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., office buildings, shopping centers, retail stores, etc.) in the United States. Candidate solar thermal and solar photovoltaic concepts are considered for providing on-site electrical power generation as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. The solar thermal concepts include the use of solar concentrators (distributed or central receiver) for collection of the thermal energy for conversion to electricity by means of a Rankine cycle or Brayton cycle power conversion system. Recoverable waste heat from the power generation process is utilized to help meet the building thermal energy demand. Evaluation methodology is identified to allow ranking and/or selection of the most cost-effective concept for commercial building applications.
Date: April 25, 1977
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Annual environmental monitoring report: calendar year 1976. [/sup 3/H, /sup 238/Pu, Mound laboratory]

Description: The local environment surrounding Mound Laboratory was monitored for tritium and plutonium-238 released by Mound Laboratory. The results are reported for calendar year 1976. The environmental parameters analyzed included air, water, foodstuffs, and silt. The average concentrations of plutonium-238 and tritium were within the stringent standards for radioactive species adopted by the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration. Data concerning nonradioactive species in air and water are also presented and compared to federal, state, and local standards, where applicable. Although there are no specific standards (RCG) for plutonium-238 and tritium in foodstuffs, the concentrations found, if compared to the water standard, are also a small fraction of the RCG. In addition, there is no evidence of other than minimal reentrainment of radioactive species from silt. Mound Laboratory has undertaken a comprehensive program to bring water supplies into compliance with new U.S. EPA drinking water standards which will be effective June 24, 1977. Mound Laboratory has been granted a National Pollutant Discharge Ellimination System permit. Analyses during 1976 indicate compliance with permit conditions. All results indicated that Mound effluent streams have no significant effect on the Great Miami River and certainly do not cause Ohio Stream Standards to be exceeded. These data demonstrate compliance with various current regulatory agency standards and that the operation of Mound Laboratory has a negligible effect on the environment.
Date: April 25, 1977
Creator: Farmer, B. M.; Robinson, B. & Carfagno, D. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Radiochemical Assays of Irradiated VVER-440 Fuel for Use in Spent Fuel Burnup Credit Activities

Description: The objective of this spent fuel burnup credit work was to study and describe a VVER-440 reactor spent fuel assembly (FA) initial state before irradiation, its operational irradiation history and the resulting radionuclide distribution in the fuel assembly after irradiation. This work includes the following stages: (1) to pick out and select a specific spent (irradiated) FA for examination; (2) to describe the FA initial state before irradiation; (3) to describe the irradiation history, including thermal calculations; (4) to examine the burnup distribution of select radionuclides along the FA height and cross-section; (5) to examine the radionuclide distributions; (6) to determine the Kr-85 release into the plenum; (7) to select and prepare FA rod specimens for destructive examinations; (8) to determine the radionuclide compositions, isotope masses and burnup in the rod specimens; and (9) to analyze, document and process the results. The specific workscope included the destructive assay (DA) of spent fuel assembly rod segments with an {approx}38.5 MWd/KgU burnup from a single VVER-440 fuel assembly from the Novovorenezh reactor in Russia. Based on irradiation history criteria, four rods from the fuel assembly were selected and removed from the assembly for examination. Next, 8 sections were cut from the four rods and sent for destructive analysis of radionuclides by radiochemical analyses. The results were documented in a series of seven reports over a period of {approx}1 1/2 years.
Date: April 25, 2005
Creator: Jardine, L J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Data Package for Groundwater Monitoring Well 299-W15-43 at the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit

Description: One new groundwater monitoring well was constructed at the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit in November 2002. This document provides the information on drilling and construction of this well. One new groundwater monitoring well was constructed in the 200-ZP-1 Operable Unit in November 2002. The purpose of the well is to monitor carbon tetrachloride concentrations in response to the 200-ZP-1 carbon tetrachloride pump-and-treat operations. The well name is 299-W15-43 and the corresponding well number is C3955. Well 299-W15-43 is located about 8 meters west of the 216-T-25 trench. The location of the well is shown on Figure 1. Well 299-W15-43 was drilled in response to the recommendations of a Data Quality Objectives process that indicated a need for additional monitoring wells in the area (BHI-01576). The new well was constructed to the specifications and requirements described in Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-160 and WAC 173-303, the Data Quality Objectives document (BHI-01576), and the description of work for well drilling and construction. This document compiles information on the drilling and construction, geophysical logging, and sediment and groundwater sampling applicable to the installation of well 299-W15-43. The information on drilling and construction, well development, and pump installation is summarized from CP-14265. Appendix A contains the Well Summary Sheets (as-built diagrams), the Well Construction Summary Reports, and the geologist's logs; Appendix B contains results of physical properties testing; Appendix C contains the analytical results from groundwater samples obtained during drilling; and Appendix D contains borehole geophysical logs. Additional documentation concerning well construction can be found in CP-14265 and is on file with Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA.
Date: April 25, 2003
Creator: Horton, Duane G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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National Ignition Facility Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan

Description: Restricted availability of funding has had an adverse impact, unforeseen at the time of the original decision to projectize the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Cryogenic Target Handling Systems (NCTS) Program, on the planning and initiation of these efforts. The purpose of this document is to provide an interim project management plan describing the organizational structure and management processes currently in place for NCTS. Preparation of a Program Execution Plan (PEP) for NCTS has been initiated, and a current draft is provided as Attachment 1 to this document. The National Ignition Facility is a multi-megajoule laser facility being constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in the Department of Energy (DOE). Its primary mission is to support the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) by performing experiments studying weapons physics, including fusion ignition. NIF also supports the missions of weapons effects, inertial fusion energy, and basic science in high-energy-density physics. NIF will be operated by LLNL under contract to the University of California (UC) as a national user facility. NIF is a low-hazard, radiological facility, and its operation will meet all applicable federal, state, and local Environmental Safety & Health (ES&H) requirements. The NCTS Interim Management Plan provides a summary of primary design criteria and functional requirements, current organizational structure, tracking and reporting procedures, and current planning estimates of project scope, cost, and schedule. The NIF Director controls the NIF Cryogenic Target Systems Interim Management Plan. Overall scope content and execution schedules for the High Energy Density Physics Campaign (SSP Campaign 10) are currently undergoing rebaselining and will be brought into alignment with resources expected to be available throughout the NNSA Future Years National Security Plan (FYNSP). The revised schedule for delivering this system will be decided at the national level, based on experiment campaign requirement …
Date: April 25, 2002
Creator: Warner, B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Shallow-crustal magma zones in and south of Long Valley, California: Final report for the period 1 Sept 1986 to 30 April 1988

Description: This report summarizes our investigations of seismic data from the Long Valley caldera region based mainly on data obtained from the USGS-Doe seismic network. During the period several thousands of earthquakes were recorded and located, including the extensive aftershock sequence of the July 1986 Chalfant Valley. This contract has provided partial operating support for this network, including the establishment of the first permanently-recording wideband digital station in the Mammoth Lakes region. Results presented here unclude five manuscripts involving various aspects of the research. These manuscripts cover: (1) a general description of unusual seismic phase near Mammoth Lakes and their possible use in the delineation of shallow-crustal anomalous bodies, (2) a paper which pinpoints the location of a shallow-crustal anomaly about 6 km deep and 2 to 3 km in lateral near the south end of Hilton Creek fault, (3) the documentation of a strong lateral structural change in the vicinity of Inyo Craters, and (4) papers contributing to knowledge of the tectonics of the Mammoth Lakes area.
Date: April 25, 1988
Creator: Peppin, W. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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National NIF Diagnostic Program Interim Management Plan

Description: The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has the mission of supporting Stockpile Stewardship and Basic Science research in high-energy-density plasmas. To execute those missions, the facility must provide diagnostic instrumentation capable of observing and resolving in time events and radiation emissions characteristic of the plasmas of interest. The diagnostic instrumentation must conform to high standards of operability and reliability within the NIF environment. These exacting standards, together with the facility mission of supporting a diverse user base, has led to the need for a central organization charged with delivering diagnostic capability to the NIF. The National NIF Diagnostics Program (NNDP) has been set up under the aegis of the NIF Director to provide that organization authority and accountability to the wide user community for NIF. The funds necessary to perform the work of developing diagnostics for NIF will be allocated from the National NIF Diagnostics Program to the participating laboratories and organizations. The participating laboratories and organizations will design, build, and commission the diagnostics for NIF. Restricted availability of funding has had an adverse impact, unforeseen at the time of the original decision to projectize NIF Core Diagnostics Systems and Cryogenic Target Handing Systems, on the planning and initiation of these efforts. The purpose of this document is to provide an interim project management plan describing the organizational structure and management processes currently in place for NIF Core Diagnostics Systems. Preparation of a Program Execution Plan for NIF Core Diagnostics Systems has been initiated and a current draft is provided as Attachment 1 to this document. The National NIF Diagnostics Program Interim Management Plan provides a summary of primary design criteria and functional requirements, current organizational structure, tracking and reporting procedures, and current planning estimates of project scope, cost, and schedule. The NIF Director controls the NNDP Interim Management Plan. A …
Date: April 25, 2002
Creator: Warner, B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Report on Transport and Loading of Explosives in the Femtosecond Tank, Room 1711A HEAF 00-010

Description: The current OSP associated with Room 1711A located in Building 191 (HEAF) sets a limit of 5 grams Net Explosive Weight (NEW) of explosives for the room. A question was raised as to the capability of that room to withstand the overpressure created by a detonation of 5 grams NEW of explosives. Calculations were inconclusive, but indicated the wallboard would not remain intact if there was a detonation of 5 grams NEW at a distance of eight feet from the wall. These calculations did not seem logical. To verify the hypothesis, a series of experiments were conducted in the 1 Kilogram tank. The experiments consisted of exposing a pre-built double-sided wall with the same stud spacing and drywall thickness found in the walls of Room 1711A to various amounts of explosives to create expected overpressures. The objective of this test was to prove or disprove that the walls in room 1711A could withstand a detonation of 5 grams of high explosives and to determine if larger quantities of explosives could be worked on in the room while still providing the required level of protection for personnel outside the room. Testing has verified that not only can the walls withstand a 5 gram explosion, but a 10.75 gram explosion as well. A second test was conducted using 20 grams of explosive plus a detonator. Although the inner piece of drywall cracked, the outer piece of drywall maintained its integrity, thereby confining the effects of the anticipated overpressure to the room.
Date: April 25, 2002
Creator: Hill, D L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Free-flow variability on the Jess and Souza Ranches, Altamont Pass. [Final report]

Description: A central monitoring computer was installed on each ranch. The computers were connected by communication cables to 50 turbines on the Souza Ranch and 150 turbines on the Jess Ranch. Anemometers were installed on every other turbine on 12-foot booms at 35 feet above ground level (AGL). Spacing between anemometers was approximately 200 feet in the crosswind direction by 500 feet in the parallel direction. A total of 23 turbines on the Souza Ranch was instrumented in this fashion, as well as two multi-level meteorological towers. On the Jess Ranch, 77 turbines were instrumented; about half at 35 feet AGL and half at 50 feet AGL, plus four additional towers. Wind data were collected for approximately a 100 hour period on each ranch. All turbines were shut down during these periods so that no turbine wakes would be present. The data periods were selected by the meteorologist to insure that they occurred during typical spring-summer flow regimes. The terrain features upwind of the site appear to play as significant a role in the flow variability as terrain features within the site.
Date: April 25, 1988
Creator: Nierenberg, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Additional critical experiments for computer code validation base

Description: This paper describes the validation, in accordance with ANSI/ANS-8.1-1983(R1988), of KENO V.a using the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross section library for some neutronic systems containing highly-enriched uranium, carbon, and hydrogen. This constituent combination is present in many packaging applications for the safe transportation of fissile and fissionable materials. The validation has been performed for two separate computational platforms: an IBM 3090 mainframe and an HP 9000 Series 700 workstation, both using the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Nuclear Criticality Safety Software (NCSS) code package. Critical experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Rover reactor program were identified as having the constitutents desired for this validation as well as sufficient experimental detail to allow accurate construction of KENO V.a calculational models. Calculated values of k{sub eff} for the Rover experiments, which contain uranium, carbon, and hydrogen, are between 1.0012 {+-} 0.0026 and 1.0245 {+-} 0.0023. These experiments can now be added to KENO V.a and other computer code critical experiment data bases which are used for validation and to establish upper limits on calculated values of k{sub eff} for specific applications.
Date: April 25, 1994
Creator: Elliott, E. P.; Tollefson, D. A. & Vornehm, R. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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