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TDNA Monthly Office Manager's Report: June/July 2005

Description: Monthly report written by the Texas Daily Newspaper Association's (TDNA's) office manager, Darla Thompson, to Ken Whalen providing a summary of revenues and account balances, programs, meetings, and other activities in the office during the previous months.
Date: July 29, 2005
Creator: Thompson, Darla
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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Development of Continuous Solvent Extraction Processes for Coal Derived Carbon Products Quarterly Report

Description: The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. The Hydrotreatment Facility is being prepared for trials with coal liquids. Raw coal tar distillate trials have been carried out by heating coal tar in the holding tank in the Hydrotreatment Facility. The liquids are centrifuged to warm the system up in preparation for the coal liquids. The coal tar distillate is then recycled to keep the centrifuge hot. In this way, the product has been distilled such that a softening point of approximately 110 C is reached. Then an ash test is conducted.
Date: July 13, 2005
Creator: Kennel, Elliot B.; Chen, Chong; Dadyburjor, Dady; Magean, Liviu; Stansberry, Peter G.; Stiller, Alfred H. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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ADVANCED OXYFUEL BOILERS AND PROCESS HEATERS FOR COST EFFECTIVE CO2 CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION

Description: This annual technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished during the third year of the program, January-December 2004, in the following task areas: Task 1--Conceptual Design, Task 2--Laboratory Scale Evaluations, Task 3--OTM Development, Task 4--Economic Evaluation and Commercialization Planning and Task 5--Program Management. The groundwork was laid for both the membrane materials development and the construction of the required facilities for testing the membrane reliability and performance. It has resulted in the construction of a single tube and multi-tube combustion test facility. Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) principles were applied to the membrane material selection process. The required ceramic powders were ordered and will be evaluated in 2005. Design of experiment techniques (fuel gas mixture design) were applied to the membrane performance evaluation process. The first results indicate that the oxygen flux of the membrane is significantly higher when the porous support is exposed to the fuel gas mixture instead of air. Failures of the oxygen transport membrane tube did not occur during the reporting period which is supporting evidence that our emphasis on design for robustness is yielding the desired result. All work on the project was performed in a safe manner as proven by zero recordable injuries or lost work days.
Date: July 1, 2005
Creator: Hassel, Bart van & Sirman, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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State selective dynamics of molecules, clusters, and nanostructures

Description: Early objectives of this grant were: (1) Measure two-photon excitation of even parity excitons in liquid an solid xenon, (2) Study state-to-state energy transver between two-photon laser excited states or rare-gas atoms to other rare has atoms, (3) study reactive half-collisions between xenon and chlorine leading to the XeCl* B state, (4) measure the spectra of ro-vibrational states of cluster ions and radicals formed in high-pressure discharges and to study their dynamics, (5) measure the surface and bulk electronic states of nanoparticles produced by a unique method of synthesis--laser ablation of microspheres (LAM). Using near-field and microluminescence techniques, we obtained spectra of single nanocrystals to compare with spectra obtained in a supersonic jet apparatus using resonance excitation followed by photoionization (REMPI) with time-of-flight mass analysis. These materials combine the functional advantages obtained from the “size-tunable” properties of nanocomposite materials with the fabrication and direct-write advantages of NPs manufactured by LAM. We demostrated that CdSe nanoparticles produced by LAM were efficiient fluorescers, even when deposited dry on sapphire substrates. Si nanoparticles were fluorescent when captured in ethylene glycol. We also obtiained efficient fluorescence from Er doped phosphate glass nanopartiicles which have application to gain wafeguides in integrated optics or to nanoslush lasers. We used a femptosecond laser to study the nonlinear spectra of NC composites. We are currently measuring fluorescence and second and third-order susceptibilities of composites of Ag, Si, and GaN nanoparticles encapsulated within thin films of sapphire or SiO2.
Date: July 25, 2005
Creator: Keto, John W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma Quarterly Technical Progress Report: April-June 2005

Description: West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we continue to describe the use of surfactant to alter the wettability of the rock. By altering the wettability, we should be able to change the water-gas ratio in the reservoir and, hence, improve the productivity from the well. In our Engineering and Geological Analysis section, we present our rock typing analysis work which combines the geological data with engineering data to develop a unique rock characteristics description. The work demonstrates that it is possible to incorporate geological description in engineering analysis so that we can come up with rock types which have unique geological characteristics, as well as unique petrophysical characteristics. Using this rock typing scheme, we intend to develop a detailed reservoir description in our next quarterly report.
Date: July 1, 2005
Creator: Kelkar, Mohan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Refractory for Black Liquor Gasifiers Quarterly Report

Description: The University of Missouri-Rolla will identify materials that will permit the safe, reliable and economical operation of combined cycle gasifiers by the pulp and paper industry. The primary emphasis of this project will be to resolve the material problems encountered during the operation of low-pressure high-temperature (LPHT) and low-pressure low-temperature (LPLT) gasifiers while simultaneously understanding the materials barriers to the successful demonstration of high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) black liquor gasifiers. This study will define the chemical, thermal and physical conditions in current and proposed gasifier designs and then modify existing materials and develop new materials to successfully meet the formidable material challenges. Resolving the material challenges of black liquor gasification combined cycle technology will provide energy, environmental, and economic benefits that include higher thermal efficiencies, up to three times greater electrical output per unit of fuel, and lower emissions. In the near term, adoption of this technology will allow the pulp and paper industry greater capital effectiveness and flexibility, as gasifiers are added to increase mill capacity. In the long term, combined-cycle gasification will lessen the industry's environmental impact while increasing its potential for energy production, allowing the production of all the mill's heat and power needs along with surplus electricity being returned to the grid. An added benefit will be the potential elimination of the possibility of smelt-water explosions, which constitute an important safety concern wherever conventional Tomlinson recovery boilers are operated. Developing cost-effective materials with improved performance in gasifier environments may be the best answer to the material challenges presented by black liquor gasification. Refractory materials may be selected/developed that either react with the gasifier environment to form protective surfaces in-situ; are functionally-graded to give the best combination of thermal, mechanical, and physical properties and chemical stability; or are relatively inexpensive, reliable repair materials. Material development will be divided …
Date: July 1, 2005
Creator: Headrick, William L., Jr.; Karakus, Musa & Liang, Xiaoting
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Energy Saving Method of Manufacturing Ceramic Products from Fiber Glass Waste

Description: The U.S. fiber glass industry disposes of more than 260,000 tons of industrial fiber glass waste in landfills annually. New technology is needed to reprocess this industrial waste into useful products. A low-cost energy-saving method of manufacturing ceramic tile from fiber glass waste was developed. The technology is based on sintering fiber glass waste at 700-900 degrees C to produce products which traditionally require firing temperatures of >1200 degrees C, or glass-melting temperatures >1500 degrees C. The process also eliminates other energy intensive processing steps, including mining and transportation of raw materials, spray-drying to produce granulated powder, drying pressed tile, and glazing. The technology completely transforms fiber glass waste into a dense ceramic product, so that all future environmental problems in the handling and disposal of the fibers is eliminated. The processing steps were developed and optimized to produce glossy and matte surface finishes for wall and floor tile applications. High-quality prototype tile samples were processed for demonstration and tile standards testing. A Market Assessment confirmed the market potential for tile products produced by the technology. Manufacturing equipment trials were successfully conducted for each step of the process. An industrial demonstration plant was designed, including equipment and operating cost analysis. A fiber glass manufacturer was selected as an industrial partner to commercialize the technology. A technology development and licensing agreement was completed with the industrial partner. Haun labs will continue working to transfer the technology and assist the industrial partner with commercialization beyond the DOE project.
Date: July 15, 2005
Creator: Haun, Michael J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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LIGNITE FUEL ENHANCEMENT

Description: This 4th quarterly Technical Progress Report for the Lignite Fuel Enhancement Project summarizes activities from April 1st through June 30th of 2005. It also summarizes the subsequent purchasing activity and dryer/process construction.
Date: July 7, 2005
Creator: Bullinger, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure Quarterly Technical Progress Report: April-June 2005

Description: This quarterly report documents work performed under Tasks 15, 16, and 18 through 23 of the project entitled: ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure''. The project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity. The report first documents a survey site test performed on a TCVC10 engine/compressor installed at Dominion's Groveport Compressor Station. This test completes planned screening efforts designed to guide selection of one or more units for design analysis and testing with emphasis on identification and reduction of compressor losses. The report further presents the validation of the simulation model for the Air Balance tasks and outline of conceptual manifold designs.
Date: July 27, 2005
Creator: Smalley, Anthony J.; Harris, Ralph E.; Bourn, Gary D. & Deffenbaugh, Danny M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Screening Methods for Selection of Surfactant Formulations for IOR From Fractured Carbonate Reservoirs

Description: This topical report presents details of the laboratory work performed to complete Task 1 of this project; developing rapid screening methods to assess surfactant performance for IOR (Improved Oil Recovery) from fractured carbonate reservoirs. The desired outcome is to identify surfactant formulations that increase the rate and amount of aqueous phase imbibition into oil-rich, oil-wet carbonate reservoir rock. Changing the wettability from oil-wet to water-wet is one key to enhancing this water-phase imbibition process that in turn recovers additional oil from the matrix portion of a carbonate reservoir. The common laboratory test to evaluate candidate surfactant formulations is to measure directly the aqueous imbibition rate and oil recovery from small outcrop or reservoir cores, but this procedure typically requires several weeks. Two methods are presented here for the rapid screening of candidate surfactant formulations for their potential IOR performance in carbonate reservoirs. One promising surfactant screening protocol is based on the ability of a surfactant solution to remove aged crude oil that coats a clear calcite crystal (Iceland Spar). Good surfactant candidate solutions remove the most oil the quickest from the chips, plus change the apparent contact angle of the remaining oil droplets on the surface that thereby indicate increased water-wetting. The other fast surfactant screening method is based on the flotation behavior of powdered calcite in water. In this test protocol, first the calcite power is pre-treated to make the surface oil-wet. The next step is to add the pre-treated powder to a test tube and add a candidate aqueous surfactant formulation; the greater the percentage of the calcite that now sinks to the bottom rather than floats, the more effective the surfactant is in changing the solids to become now preferentially water-wet. Results from the screening test generally are consistent with surfactant performance reported in the literature.
Date: July 1, 2005
Creator: Goddard, William A., III; Tang, Yongchun; Shuler, Patrick; Blanco, Mario; Wu, Yongfu & Jang, Seung Soon
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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PHASE ANALYSES OF URANIUM-BEARING MINERALS FROM THE HIGH GRADE ORE, NOPAL I, PENA BLANCA, MEXICO

Description: The Nopal I uranium deposit is located in the Pena Blanca district, approximately 40 miles north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The deposit was formed by hydrothermal processes within the fracture zone of welded silicic volcanic tuff. The ages of volcanic formations are between 35 to 44 m.y. and there was secondary silicification of most of the formations. After the formation of at least part of the uranium deposit, the ore body was uplifted above the water table and is presently exposed at the surface. Detailed petrographic characterization, electron microprobe backscatter electron (BSE) imagery, and selected x-ray maps for the samples from Nopal I high-grade ore document different uranium phases in the ore. There are at least two stages of uranium precipitation. A small amount of uraninite is encapsulated in silica. Hexavalent uranium may also have been a primary precipitant. The uranium phases were precipitated along cleavages of feldspars, and along fractures in the tuff. Energy dispersive spectrometer data and x-ray maps suggest that the major uranium phases are uranophane and weeksite. Substitutions of Ca and K occur in both phases, implying that conditions were variable during the mineralization/alteration process, and that compositions of the original minerals have a major influence on later stage alteration. Continued study is needed to fully characterize uranium behavior in these semi-arid to arid conditions.
Date: July 11, 2005
Creator: Ren, M.; Goodell, P.; Kelts, A.; Anthony, E.Y.; Fayek, M.; Fan, C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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STIFLING OF CREVICE CORROSION IN ALLOY 22

Description: Artificially creviced Alloy 22 (N06022) specimens may be susceptible to crevice corrosion in presence of hot chloride containing solutions. The presence of oxyanions in the electrolyte, especially nitrate, may inhibit the nucleation and growth of crevice corrosion. Constant potential tests were performed using tightly creviced specimens of Alloy 22. It was found that crevice corrosion may initiate when a constant potential above the crevice repassivation potential is applied. It was found that as the crevice corrosion nucleated, the current initially increased but later decreased. The net measured current can be converted into penetration following a power law fit of the experimental data. The average power law coefficient ''n'' was found to be 0.439, suggesting that even under constant applied potential, crevice corrosion penetration is diffusion controlled.
Date: July 1, 2005
Creator: Mon, K.G.; Gordon, G.M. & Rebak, R.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Monte carlo Techniques for the Comprehensive Modeling of Isotopic Inventories in Future Nuclear Systems and Fuel Cycles

Description: The development of Monte Carlo techniques for isotopic inventory analysis has been explored in order to facilitate the modeling of systems with flowing streams of material through varying neutron irradiation environments. This represents a novel application of Monte Carlo methods to a field that has traditionally relied on deterministic solutions to systems of first-order differential equations. The Monte Carlo techniques were based largely on the known modeling techniques of Monte Carlo radiation transport, but with important differences, particularly in the area of variance reduction and efficiency measurement. The software that was developed to implement and test these methods now provides a basis for validating approximate modeling techniques that are available to deterministic methodologies. The Monte Carlo methods have been shown to be effective in reproducing the solutions of simple problems that are possible using both stochastic and deterministic methods. The Monte Carlo methods are also effective for tracking flows of materials through complex systems including the ability to model removal of individual elements or isotopes in the system. Computational performance is best for flows that have characteristic times that are large fractions of the system lifetime. As the characteristic times become short, leading to thousands or millions of passes through the system, the computational performance drops significantly. Further research is underway to determine modeling techniques to improve performance within this range of problems. This report describes the technical development of Monte Carlo techniques for isotopic inventory analysis. The primary motivation for this solution methodology is the ability to model systems of flowing material being exposed to varying and stochastically varying radiation environments. The methodology was developed in three stages: analog methods which model each atom with true reaction probabilities (Section 2), non-analog methods which bias the probability distributions while adjusting atom weights to preserve a fair game (Section 3), and …
Date: July 30, 2005
Creator: Wilson, Paul P.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Documentation of Calculation Methodology, Input data, and Infrastructure for the Home Energy Saver Web Site

Description: The Home Energy Saver (HES, http://HomeEnergySaver.lbl.gov) is an interactive web site designed to help residential consumers make decisions about energy use in their homes. This report describes the underlying methods and data for estimating energy consumption. Using engineering models, the site estimates energy consumption for six major categories (end uses); heating, cooling, water heating, major appliances, lighting, and miscellaneous equipment. The approach taken by the Home Energy Saver is to provide users with initial results based on a minimum of user input, allowing progressively greater control in specifying the characteristics of the house and energy consuming appliances. Outputs include energy consumption (by fuel and end use), energy-related emissions (carbon dioxide), energy bills (total and by fuel and end use), and energy saving recommendations. Real-world electricity tariffs are used for many locations, making the bill estimates even more accurate. Where information about the house is not available from the user, default values are used based on end-use surveys and engineering studies. An extensive body of qualitative decision-support information augments the analytical results.
Date: July 13, 2005
Creator: Pinckard, Margaret J.; Brown, Richard E.; Mills, Evan; Lutz, James D.; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Atkinson, Celina et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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COMPARISON OF THREE METHODS TO PROJECT FUTURE BASELINE CARBON EMISSIONS IN TEMPERATE RAINFOREST, CURINANCO, CHILE

Description: Deforestation of temperate rainforests in Chile has decreased the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation can restore those ecosystem services. Greenhouse gas policies that offer financing for the carbon emissions avoided by preventing deforestation require a projection of future baseline carbon emissions for an area if no forest conservation occurs. For a proposed 570 km{sup 2} conservation area in temperate rainforest around the rural community of Curinanco, Chile, we compared three methods to project future baseline carbon emissions: extrapolation from Landsat observations, Geomod, and Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis (FRCA). Analyses of forest inventory and Landsat remote sensing data show 1986-1999 net deforestation of 1900 ha in the analysis area, proceeding at a rate of 0.0003 y{sup -1}. The gross rate of loss of closed natural forest was 0.042 y{sup -1}. In the period 1986-1999, closed natural forest decreased from 20,000 ha to 11,000 ha, with timber companies clearing natural forest to establish plantations of non-native species. Analyses of previous field measurements of species-specific forest biomass, tree allometry, and the carbon content of vegetation show that the dominant native forest type, broadleaf evergreen (bosque siempreverde), contains 370 {+-} 170 t ha{sup -1} carbon, compared to the carbon density of non-native Pinus radiata plantations of 240 {+-} 60 t ha{sup -1}. The 1986-1999 conversion of closed broadleaf evergreen forest to open broadleaf evergreen forest, Pinus radiata plantations, shrublands, grasslands, urban areas, and bare ground decreased the carbon density from 370 {+-} 170 t ha{sup -1} carbon to an average of 100 t ha{sup -1} (maximum 160 t ha{sup -1}, minimum 50 t ha{sup -1}). Consequently, the conversion released 1.1 million t carbon. These analyses of forest inventory and Landsat remote sensing data provided the data to evaluate the three methods to project future baseline …
Date: July 14, 2005
Creator: Gonzalez, Patrick; Lara, Antonio; Gayoso, Jorge; Neira, Eduardo; Romero, Patricio & Sotomayor, Leonardo
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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GAMMA-RAY CHARACTERIZATION OF THE U-SERIES INTERMEDIATE DAUGHTERS FROM SOIL SAMPLES AT THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOG, CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO

Description: The Pena Blanca natural analog is located in the Sierra Pena Blanca, approximately 50 miles north of Chihuahua City, Mexico. The Sierra Pena Blanca is composed mainly of ash-flow tuffs, and the uranium in the region is contained in the brecciated zones of these tuffs. The Pena Blanca site is considered a natural analog to the proposed Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository because they share similar characteristics of structure, volcanic lithology, tectonic activity, and hydrologic regime. One of the mineralized zones, the Nopal I deposit, was mined in the early 1980s and the ore was stockpiled close to the mine. This stockpile area has subsequently been cleared and is referred to as the prior high-grade stockpile (PHGS) site. Soil surrounding boulders of high-grade ore associated with the PHGS site have been sampled. The purpose of this study is to characterize the transport of uranium series radioisotopes from the boulder to the soil during the past 25 years. Transport is characterized by determining the activities of individual radionuclides and daughter to parent ratios. The daughter to parent ratios are used to establish whether the samples are in secular equilibrium. Activities are determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy. Isotopes of the uranium series decay chain detected by gamma-ray spectroscopy include {sup 210}Pb, {sup 234}U, {sup 234}Th, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 214}Pb, {sup 214}Bi, and {sup 234}Pa. Preliminary results indicate that some daughter to parent pairs appear to be in secular disequilibrium. Thorium is in excess relative to uranium, and radium is in excess relative to thorium. A deficiency appears to exist for {sup 210}Pb relative to {sup 214}Bi and {sup 214}Pb. If these results are borne out by further analysis, they would suggest transport of nuclides from the high-grade boulder into its surroundings, followed by continued leaching of uranium and lead from the …
Date: July 18, 2005
Creator: French, D.C.; Anthony, E.Y. & Goodell, P.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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THE EFFECT OF IONIZING RADIATION ON U6+ -PHASES

Description: U{sup 6+}-minerals commonly form during the alteration of uraninite and spent nuclear fuel under oxidizing conditions. By the incorporation of actinides and fissiogenic elements into their structures, U{sup 6+}-minerals may be important in retarding the migration of radionuclides released during corrosion of spent nuclear fuel. Thus, the stability and the structural transformation of the U{sup 6+}-minerals in radiation fields are of great interest.
Date: July 7, 2005
Creator: Utsunomiya, S. & Ewing, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Final Report for Radiaiton Resistant Magnets for RIA

Description: Report on techniques for the fabrication of radiation resistant magnets for the RIA Fragment Separator. The development of magnet designs capable of reasonable life times in high-radiation environments and having reasonable performance is of paramount importance for RIA as well as other high-intensity projects under consideration, such as the Neutrino Factory and FAIR project at GSI. Several approaches were evaluated for radiation resistant superconducting magnets. One approach was to simply use a more radiation resistant epoxy for the coil fabrication. Another approach for cryostable magnets, like the S800 Spectrograph dipole, is the use of all-inorganic materials. The final approach was the development of radiation resistant Cable-In-Conduit-Conductor (CICC) like that used in fusion magnets; though these are not radiation resistant because an organic insulator is used. Simulations have shown that the nuclear radiation heating of the first quadrupoles in the RIA Fragment Separator will be so large that cold mass minimization will be necessary with the magnet iron being at room temperature. Three different types of conductor for radiation resistant superconducting magnets have been built and successfully tested. The cyanate ester potted coils will work nicely for magnets where the lifetime dose is a factor of 20 less than the end of life of the superconductor and the rate of energy deposition is below the heat-removal limit of the coil. The all-inorganic cryostable coil and the metal oxide insulated CICC will provide conductor that will work up to the life of the superconductor and have the ability to remove large quantities of nuclear heating. Obviously, more work needs to be done on the CICC to increase the current density and to develop different insulations; and on the cyanate esters to increase the heat transfer.
Date: July 27, 2005
Creator: Zeller, A. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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RADIONUCLIDE DISPERSION RATES BY AEOLIAN, FLUVIAL, AND POROUS MEDIA TRANSPORT

Description: Radionuclide transport was measured from high grade uranium ore boulders near the Nopal I Site, Chihuahua, Mexico. High grade uranium ore boulders were left behind after removal of a uranium ore stockpile at the Prior High Grade Stockpile (PHGS). During the 25 years when the boulder was present, radionuclides were released and transported by sheetflow during precipitation events, wind blown resuspension, and infiltration into the unsaturated zone. In this study, one of the boulders was removed, followed by grid sampling of the surrounding area. Measured gamma radiation levels in three dimensions were used to derive separate dispersion rates by the three transport mechanisms.
Date: July 11, 2005
Creator: Walton, J.; Goodell, P.; Brashears, C.; French, D. & Kelts, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Assistance to States on Policies Related to Wind Energy Issues

Description: This final report summarizes work carried out under agreement with the US Department of Energy, related to wind energy policy issues. This project has involved a combination of outreach and publications on wind energy, with a specific focus on educating state-level policymakers. Education of state policymakers is vitally important because state policy (in the form of incentives or regulation) is a crucial part of the success of wind energy. State policymakers wield a significant influence over all of these policies. They are also in need of high quality, non-biased educational resources which this project provided. This project provided outreach to legislatures, in the form of meetings designed specifically for state legislators and legislative staff, responses to information requests on wind energy, and publications. The publications addressed: renewable energy portfolio standards, wind energy transmission, wind energy siting, case studies of wind energy policy, avian issues, economic development, and other related issues. These publications were distributed to legislative energy committee members, and chairs, legislative staff, legislative libraries, and other related state officials. The effect of this effort has been to provide an extensive resource of information about wind information for state policymakers in a form that is useful to them. This non-partisan information has been used as state policymakers attempt to develop their own policy proposals related to wind energy in the states.
Date: July 15, 2005
Creator: Brown, Matthew H.; Decesaro, Jennifer & Bennett, Keith
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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ULTRA-HIGH TEMPERATURE SENSORS BASED ON OPTICAL PROPERTY MODULATION AND VIBRATION-TOLERANT INTERFEROMETRY

Description: The goals of the first six months of this project were to begin laying the foundations for both the SiC front-end optical chip fabrication techniques for high pressure gas species sensing as well as the design, assembly, and test of a portable high pressure high temperature calibration test cell chamber for introducing gas species. This calibration cell will be used in the remaining months for proposed first stage high pressure high temperature gas species sensor experimentation and data processing. All these goals have been achieved and are described in detail in the report. Both design process and diagrams for the mechanical elements as well as the optical systems are provided. Photographs of the fabricated calibration test chamber cell, the optical sensor setup with the calibration cell, the SiC sample chip holder, and relevant signal processing mathematics are provided. Initial experimental data from both the optical sensor and fabricated test gas species SiC chips is provided. The design and experimentation results are summarized to give positive conclusions on the proposed novel high temperature high pressure gas species detection optical sensor technology.
Date: July 22, 2005
Creator: Riza, Nabeel A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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