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Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

Description: Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the October 1 to December 30, 2004 time period.
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Wu, Song; Fan, Zhen & Herman, Richard G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Architectural and engineering design work for the Nevada Cancer Institute facility

Description: The purpose of this project was to complete the architectural and engineering design, program planning, and other preliminary work necessary to construct the new Nevada Cancer Institute facility. These goals were accomplished with the construction of a new building of approximately 119,000 gross square feet. The facility houses the diagnostic and radio therapeutic treatment laboratories, radiation oncology treatment facility, physician offices, and clinical research areas.
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Murren, Heather
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2004

Description: Like a rock that slowly wears away beneath the pressure of a waterfall, planet earth?s climate is almost imperceptibly changing. Glaciers are getting smaller, droughts are lasting longer, and extreme weather events like fires, floods, and tornadoes are occurring with greater frequency. Why? Part of the answer is clouds and the amount of solar radiation they reflect or absorb. These two factors clouds and radiative transfer represent the greatest source of error and uncertainty in the current generation of general circulation models used for climate research and simulation. The U.S. Global Change Research Act of 1990 established an interagency program within the Executive Office of the President to coordinate U.S. agency-sponsored scientific research designed to monitor, understand, and predict changes in the global environment. To address the need for new research on clouds and radiation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. As part of the DOE?s overall Climate Change Science Program, a primary objective of the ARM Program is improved scientific understanding of the fundamental physics related to interactions between clouds and radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere.
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Voyles, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2004

Description: Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 × 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 × 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 × 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related …
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Sisterson, D. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture

Description: Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. Three different SCR catalysts are being studied. These are honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts are manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Test methods and experimental procedures were developed for current and future testing. The methods and procedures equalize factors influencing mercury adsorption and oxidation (surface area, catalyst activity, and pore structure) that normally differ for each catalyst type. Initial testing was performed to determine the time necessary for each catalyst to reach surface-adsorption equilibrium. In addition, the fraction of Hg oxidized by each of the SCR catalyst types is being investigated, for a given amount of catalyst and flow rate of mercury and flue gas. The next major effort will be to examine the kinetics of mercury oxidation across the SCR catalysts with respect to changes in mercury concentration and with respect to HCl concentration. Hg-sorption equilibrium times will also be investigated with respect to ammonia concentration in the simulated flue gas.
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Cannon, Jared W. & Gale, Thomas K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Coal Combustion Products Extension Program

Description: The primary objective of the CCP Extension Program is to promote the responsible uses of Ohio CCPs that are technically sound, environmentally safe, and commercially competitive. A secondary objective is to assist other CCP generating states (particularly neighboring states) in establishing CCP use programs within their states. The goal of the CCP extension program at OSU is to work with CCP stakeholders to increase the overall CCP state utilization rate to more than 30% by the year 2005. The program aims to increase FGD utilization for Ohio to more than 20% by the year 2005. The increased utilization rates are expected to be achieved through increased use of CCPs for highway, mine reclamation, agricultural, manufacturing, and other civil engineering uses. In order to accomplish these objectives and goals, the highly successful CCP pilot extension program previously in place at the university has been expanded and adopted by the university as a part of its outreach and engagement mission. The extension program is an innovative technology transfer program with multiple sponsors. The program is a collaborative effort between The Ohio State University (College of Engineering and University Extension Service), United States Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Ohio Department of Development's Coal Development Office, and trade associations such as the American Coal Ash Association as well as the Midwest Coal Ash Association. Industry co-sponsors include American Electric Power, Dravo Lime Company, and ISG Resources. Implementation of the proposed project results in both direct and indirect as well as societal benefits. These benefits include (1) increased utilization of CCPs instead of landfilling, (2) development of proper construction and installation procedures, (3) education of regulators, specification-writers, designers, construction contractors, and the public, (4) emphasis on recycling and decrease in the need for landfill space, (5) conservation of natural resources, (6) better products …
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Butalia, Tarunjit S. & Wolfe, William E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Collaborative Research: Analysis and Interpretation of Multi-Scale Phenomena in Crustal Deformation Processes Using Numerical Simulations of Complex Nonlinear Earth Systems

Description: In both our past work and the work in progress we focused on understanding the physics and statistical patterns in earthquake faults and fault systems. Our approach had three key aspects. The first was to look for patterns of seismic activity in earthquake fault systems. The second was to understand the physics of a sequence of models for faults and fault systems that are increasingly more realistic. The third key element was to connect the two previous approaches by investigating specific properties found in models to see if they are indeed properties of real faults. A specific example of how this approach works can be seen in the following: In the papers discussed below, we demonstrated that the cellular automation (CA) versions of the slider block models with long range stress transfer are ergodic and could be described by a Boltzmann-Gibbs distribution in the meanfield limit. The ergodicity follows from the fact that the long range stress transfer makes the model meanfield. The meanfield nature of the CA models, generated by long range stress transfer, also allows a description of the CA models by a Langevin equation. The Langevin equation indicates that evolution of seismicity in the model over relatively short times is linear in time. This appears to be consistent with the success of a forecasting algorithm we have developed that is based on a linear evolution of seismicity patterns. This algorithm has had considerable success in that the regions of the Southern California fault system which have been predicted to have a higher probability of an event greater than magnitude 5 have consistently been the sites where such events occur. These two results have led to the question as to whether the Southern California fault system is ergodic and can be described by a Langevin equation like the …
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Rundle, John B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Cupola Furnace Computer Process Model

Description: The cupola furnace generates more than 50% of the liquid iron used to produce the 9+ million tons of castings annually. The cupola converts iron and steel into cast iron. The main advantages of the cupola furnace are lower energy costs than those of competing furnaces (electric) and the ability to melt less expensive metallic scrap than the competing furnaces. However the chemical and physical processes that take place in the cupola furnace are highly complex making it difficult to operate the furnace in optimal fashion. The results are low energy efficiency and poor recovery of important and expensive alloy elements due to oxidation. Between 1990 and 2004 under the auspices of the Department of Energy, the American Foundry Society and General Motors Corp. a computer simulation of the cupola furnace was developed that accurately describes the complex behavior of the furnace. When provided with the furnace input conditions the model provides accurate values of the output conditions in a matter of seconds. It also provides key diagnostics. Using clues from the diagnostics a trained specialist can infer changes in the operation that will move the system toward higher efficiency. Repeating the process in an iterative fashion leads to near optimum operating conditions with just a few iterations. More advanced uses of the program have been examined. The program is currently being combined with an ''Expert System'' to permit optimization in real time. The program has been combined with ''neural network'' programs to affect very easy scanning of a wide range of furnace operation. Rudimentary efforts were successfully made to operate the furnace using a computer. References to these more advanced systems will be found in the ''Cupola Handbook''. Chapter 27, American Foundry Society, Des Plaines, IL (1999).
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Katz, Seymour
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Database of prompt gamma rays from slow neutron capture forelemental analysis

Description: The increasing importance of Prompt Gamma-ray ActivationAnalysis (PGAA) in a broad range of applications is evident, and has beenemphasized at many meetings related to this topic (e.g., TechnicalConsultants' Meeting, Use of neutron beams for low- andmedium-fluxresearch reactors: radiography and materialscharacterizations, IAEA Vienna, 4-7 May 1993, IAEA-TECDOC-837, 1993).Furthermore, an Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) for the Coordination of theNuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators Network has stated that thereis a need for a complete and consistent library of cold- and thermalneutron capture gammaray and cross-section data (AGM held at Budapest,14-18 October 1996, INDC(NDS)-363); this AGM also recommended theorganization of an IAEA CRP on the subject. The International NuclearData Committee (INDC) is the primary advisory body to the IAEA NuclearData Section on their nuclear data programmes. At a biennial meeting in1997, the INDC strongly recommended that the Nuclear Data Section supportnew measurements andupdate the database on Neutron-induced PromptGamma-ray Activation Analysis (21st INDC meeting, INDC/P(97)-20). As aconsequence of the various recommendations, a CRP on "Development of aDatabase for Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGAA)" wasinitiated in 1999. Prior to this project, several consultants had definedthe scope, objectives and tasks, as approved subsequently by the IAEA.Each CRP participant assumed responsibility for the execution of specifictasks. The results of their and other research work were discussed andapproved by the participants in research co-ordination meetings (seeSummary reports: INDC(NDS)-411, 2000; INDC(NDS)-424, 2001; andINDC(NDS)-443, 200). PGAA is a non-destructive radioanalytical method,capable of rapid or simultaneous "in-situ" multi-element analyses acrossthe entire Periodic Table, from hydrogen to uranium. However, inaccurateand incomplete data were a significant hindrance in the qualitative andquantitative analysis of complicated capture-gamma spectra by means ofPGAA. Therefore, the main goal of the CRP was to improve the quality andquantity of the required data in order to make possible the reliableapplication of PGAA in fields such as materials science, chemistry,geology, …
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Firestone, R. B.; Choi, H. D.; Lindstrom, R. M.; Molnar, G. L.; Mughabghab, S. F.; Paviotti-Corcuera, R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF INTEGRATED COMPACT MULTIPHASE SEPARATION SYSTEM (CMSS)

Description: The petroleum industry has relied in the past mainly on conventional vessel-type separators, which are bulky, heavy and expensive, to process wellhead production of oil-water-gas flow. Economic and operational pressures continue to force the petroleum industry to seek less expensive and more efficient separation alternatives in the form of compact separators. The compact dimensions, smaller footprint and lower weight of compact separators have a potential for cost savings to the industry, especially in offshore and subsea applications. Also, compact separators reduce the inventory of hydrocarbons significantly, which is critical for environmental and safety considerations. This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the part July 09, 2003--October 08, 2004, related to the Budget Period I (July 09, 2003--October 08, 2004) of the DOE project titled ''Design and Development of Integrated Compact Multiphase Separation System (CMSS{copyright})''. An executive summary is presented initially followed by the tasks of the current budget period. Then, detailed description of the experimental and modeling investigations are presented. Subsequently, the technical and scientific results of the activities of this project period are presented with discussions. The findings of this investigation are summarized in the ''Conclusions'' section followed by relevant references. The initial phase of the project (Budget Period I--07/09/2003 to 10/08/2004) focuses on the development of additional individual compact separation components, such as the horizontal pipe separator (HPS{copyright}), for obtaining clean oil stream from oil-water mixture, flow conditioning components, such as the helical pipe (HP) and slug damper (SD{copyright}), for dissipating slugs upstream of the compact separators. The project will also design and test an upstream slug generator (SG).
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Mohan, Ram S. & Shoham, Ovadia
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF IONIC LIQUIDS AS NOVEL CO2 ABSORBENTS

Description: Progress from the first quarter of activity on the project ''Design and Evaluation of Ionic Liquids as Novel CO{sub 2} Absorbents'' is provided. Major activities in three areas are reported: ''assembling equipment and a research team, compound synthesis and molecular modeling''. Nine new ionic liquid compounds have been made or acquired, and are in line for physical property testing to assess their potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration. Quantum mechanical calculations between CO{sub 2} and different ionic liquids have been conducted. The simulations have shed light on the nature of interactions between CO{sub 2} and the ionic liquids, and are providing insight that will be used to suggest new compounds to be synthesized and tested.
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Maginn, Edward J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs, Quarterly Report: October 1 - December 31, 2004

Description: Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for …
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Paulsson, Bjorn N. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Development of a Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications

Description: In this program TIAX LLC conducted the development of an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The overall objective of this program was to develop a hybrid compressor/expander module, based on both scroll and high-speed turbomachinery technologies, which will combine the strengths of each technology to create a concept with superior performance at minimal size and cost. The resulting system was expected to have efficiency and pressure delivery capability comparable to that of a scroll-only machine, at significantly reduced system size and weight when compared to scroll-only designs. Based on the results of detailed designs and analyses of the critical system elements, the Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module concept was projected to deliver significant improvements in weight, volume and manufacturing cost relative to previous generation systems.
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: McTaggart, Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ulta-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells Budget Period 3

Description: This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1, 2003 through December 31,2004 in the following task areas: Task 1--Materials Development; Task 2--Composite Development; Task 4--Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8--Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; and Task IO: Program Management. Most of the key technical objectives for this budget period were achieved. Only partial success was achieved relative to cycle testing under pressure Major improvements in material performance and element reliability have been achieved. A breakthrough material system has driven the development of a compact planar reactor design capable of producing either hydrogen or syngas. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and costs compared to either steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery or autothermal reforming. The fuel and engine testing program is complete The single cylinder test engine evaluation of UCTF fuels begun in Budget Period 2 was finished this budget period. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCl engine was completed.
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Robinson, E. T.; Sirman, John; Apte, Prasad; Gui, Xingun; Bulicz, Tytus R.; Corgard, Dan et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Effect of Mercury-Noble Metal Interactions on SRAT Processing of SB3 Simulants (U)

Description: Controlling hydrogen generation below the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) safety basis constrains the range of allowable acid additions in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell. This range is evaluated in simulant tests at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). A minimum range of allowable acid additions is needed to provide operational flexibility and to handle typical uncertainties in process and analytical measurements used to set acid additions during processing. The range of allowable acid additions is a function of the composition of the feed to DWPF. Feed changes that lead to a smaller range of allowable acid additions have the potential to impact decisions related to wash endpoint control of DWPF feed composition and to the introduction of secondary waste streams into DWPF. A limited program was initiated in SRNL in 2001 to study the issue of hydrogen generation. The program was reinitiated at the end of fiscal year 2004. The primary motivation for the study is that a real potential exists to reduce the conservatism in the range of allowable acid additions in DWPF. Increasing the allowable range of acid additions can allow decisions on the sludge wash endpoint or the introduction of secondary waste streams to DWPF to be based on other constraints such as glass properties, organic carbon in the melter off-gas, etc. The initial phase of the study consisted of a review of site reports and off-site literature related to catalytic hydrogen generation from formic acid and/or formate salts by noble metals. Many things are already known about hydrogen generation during waste processing. This phase also included the development of an experimental program to improve the understanding of hydrogen generation. This phase is being documented in WSRC-TR-2002-00034. A number of areas were identified where an improved understanding would be beneficial. A phased approach was developed for …
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Koopman, D. C. & Baich, M. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

Description: A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of December 2004, 11.39 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 242 MCFD. Vent losses were excessive during June as ambient temperatures increased. Installation of smaller plungers in the carbon dioxide injection pump reduced the recycle and vent loss substantially. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May and in the second production well in August. No channeling of carbon dioxide was observed. The GOR has remained within the range of 3000-4000 for most the last six months. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.35 B/D for the six month period between July 1 and December 31. Cumulative oil production was 814 bbls. Neither well has experienced increased oil production rates expected from the arrival of the oil bank generated by carbon dioxide injection.
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Byrnes, Alan; Willhite, G. Paul; Green, Don; Dubois, Martin; Pancake, Richard; Carr, Timothy et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Fuel Preprocessor (FPP) for a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit

Description: Auxiliary Power Units (APUs), driven by truck engines, consume over 800 million gallon of diesel fuel while idling. Use of separate SOFC based APUs are an excellent choice to reduce the cost and pollution associated with producing auxiliary power. However, diesel fuel is a challenging fuel to use in fuel cell systems because it has heavy hydrocarbons that can transform into carbon deposits and gums that can block passages and deactivate fuel reformer and fuel cell reactor elements. The work reported herein addresses the challenges associated with the diesel fuel sulfur and carbon producing contaminants in a Fuel Preprocessor (FPP). FPP processes the diesel fuel onboard and ahead of the reformer to reduce its carbon deposition tendency and its sulfur content, thus producing a fuel suitable for SOFC APU systems. The goal of this DOE supported Invention and Innovation program was to design, develop and test a prototype Fuel Preprocessor (FPP) that efficiently and safely converts the diesel fuel into a clean fuel suitable for a SOFC APU system. The goals were achieved. A 5 kWe FPP was designed, developed and tested. It was demonstrated that FPP removes over 80% of the fuel sulfur and over 90% of its carbon residues and it was demonstrated that FPP performance exceeds the original project goals.
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Namazian, M.; Sethuraman, S. & Venkataraman, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Induced Polarization With Electromagnetic Coupling: 3D Spectral Imaging Theory: EMSP Project No. 73836

Description: The principal objective of the project was to develop a non-invasive imaging technique, based on spectral induced polarization (SIP), to characterize in-situ distribution of organic and inorganic contaminants. This was to be an advance over a similar technique offered by the DC resistivity method. The motivation for the choice of IP over resistivity is rooted in the fact that resistivity response is governed by volume distributions of electrical parameters and therefore is relatively insensitive to small changes contributed by the presence of contaminants. IP response on the other hand is governed by the electrochemical properties of the rock-grain pore-fluid interface, which can be significantly altered by the incoming contaminant (ions) over long residence times. Small concentrations of contaminants are the rule rather than the exception thus, the detection threshold for IP, which is more sensitive to small concentrations, is much lower than for resistivity (IP field threshold for PCE/TCE is about 1mg/g). Additionally, the observation that IP depends on the chemistry of the contaminants provided the motivation that a spectral IP response could lead to a database of identifying signatures by which contaminants can be discriminated.
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Morgan, F. Dale & Lesmes, David
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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INTERNAL REPAIR OF PIPELINES

Description: The two broad categories of fiber-reinforced composite liner repair and deposited weld metal repair technologies were reviewed and evaluated for potential application for internal repair of gas transmission pipelines. Both are used to some extent for other applications and could be further developed for internal, local, structural repair of gas transmission pipelines. Principal conclusions from a survey of natural gas transmission industry pipeline operators can be summarized in terms of the following performance requirements for internal repair: (1) Use of internal repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water, in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem. (3) Typical travel distances can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). All three groups require pig-based systems. A despooled umbilical system would suffice for the first two groups which represents 81% of survey respondents. The third group would require an onboard self-contained power unit for propulsion and welding/liner repair energy needs. (4) The most common size range for 80% to 90% of operators surveyed is 508 mm (20 in.) to 762 mm (30 in.), with 95% using 558.8 mm (22 in.) pipe. Evaluation trials were conducted on pipe sections with simulated corrosion damage repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liners, carbon fiber-reinforced composite liners, and weld deposition. Additional un-repaired pipe sections were evaluated in the virgin condition and with simulated damage. Hydrostatic failure pressures for pipe sections repaired with glass fiber-reinforced composite liner were only marginally greater than that of pipe …
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Gordon, Robin; Bruce, Bill; Harris, Ian; Harwig, Dennis; Ritter, George; Mohr, Bill et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report to the Department of Energy - December 2004

Description: Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a …
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Fox, K. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Material Property Estimation for Direct Detection of DNAPL using Integrated Ground-Penetrating Radar Velocity, Imaging and Attribute Analysis

Description: The focus of this project is direct detection of DNAPLs, specifically chlorinated solvents, via material property estimation from multi-fold surface ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. We combine state-of-the-art GPR processing methodology with quantitative attribute analysis and material property estimation to determine the location and extent of residual and/or pooled DNAPL in both the vadose and saturated zones. An important byproduct of our research is state-of-the-art imaging which allows us to pinpoint attribute anomalies, characterize stratigraphy, identify fracture zones, and locate buried objects.
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Bradford, John H.; Holbrook, W. Stephen & Smithson, Scott B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Mechanisms of Heavy Metal Sequestration in Soils: Plant-Microbe Interactions and Organic Matter Aging

Description: For stabilization of heavy metals at contaminated sites, the three way interaction among soil organic matter (OM)-microbes-plants, and their effect on heavy metal binding is critically important for long-term sustainability, a factor that is poorly understood at the molecular level. Using a soil aging system, the humification of plant matter such as wheat straw was probed along with the effect on microbial community on soil from the former McClellan Air Force Base.
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Fan, Teresa W.-M.; Higashi, Richard M.; Crowley, David; Cassel, Andrew N. Lane: Teresa A. & Green, Peter G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Mercury Control With The Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector

Description: This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Program Solicitation DE-FC26-01NT41184 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 4 - Testing Novel and Less Mature Control Technologies on Actual Flue Gas at the Pilot Scale. The project team included the Energy & Environmental Research Center as the main contractor; W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., as a technical and financial partner; and the Big Stone Plant operated by Otter Tail Power Company, host for the field-testing portion of the research. Since 1995, DOE has supported development of a new concept in particulate control called the advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). The AHPC has been licensed to W.L. Gore and Associates, Inc., and is marketed as the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter by Gore. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The AHPC also appears to have unique advantages for mercury control over baghouses or ESPs as an excellent gas--solid contactor. The objective of the original five-task project was to demonstrate 90% total mercury control in the AHPC at a lower cost than current mercury control estimates. The approach included benchscale batch tests, larger-scale pilot testing with real flue gas on a coal-fired combustion system, and field demonstration at the 2.5-MW scale at a utility power plant to prove scale-up and demonstrate longer-term mercury control. The scope of work was modified to include an additional sixth task, initiated in April 2003. The objective of this task was …
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Miller, Stanley J.; Zhuang, Ye & Almlie, Jay C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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