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Iipc Web Archiving Metadata Set

Description: This report presents a set of metadata elements for web archiving.
Date: November 9, 2004
Creator: Masanès, Julien
Partner: International Internet Preservation Consortium

[TDNA 2005 Budget Draft]

Description: A 2005 budget draft for the Texas Daily Newspaper Association. The document breaks down the expected income and expenses of the association for the 2005 year.
Date: November 19, 2004
Creator: Texas Daily Newspaper Association
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Extrapolation of Extreme and Fatigue Loads Using Probabilistic Methods

Description: Probabilistic methods were used to determine the long-term extreme and fatigue loads of two different 1.5 MW wind turbine designs. Over the past decade, probabilistic methods for wind turbine design have acquired increasing levels of interest in both the research and industrial community. This interest has largely been driven by the desire to replace outdated empirical-based design models with more physically relevant models that can be accurately applied to the next generation of wind turbine designs. This study further extends previous works through further examination of moment-based probability methods, as well as the effects of using a joint distribution of mean wind speed and turbulence level, and the statistical uncertainty of moment-based methods, introducing refinements such as compensating for non-zero cyclic midpoints in fatigue calculations, application of a threshold technique and full integration of all probable operating conditions.
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Moriarty, P. J.; Holley, W. E. & Butterfield, S. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Trajectory Oriented and Fault Tolerant Based Intelligent Process Control for Flexible CIGS PV Module Manufacturing Scale-Up: Phase II, Annual Technical Report, March 2004

Description: ITN Energy Systems, Inc., and Global Solar Energy, Inc., with the assistance of NREL's PV Manufacturing R&D program, have continued the advancement of CIGS production technology through the development of trajectory-oriented predictive/control models, fault-tolerance control, control-platform development, in-situ sensors, and process improvements. Modeling activities to date include the development of physics-based and empirical models for CIGS and sputter-deposition processing, implementation of model-based control, and application of predictive models to the construction of new evaporation sources and for control. Model-based control is enabled through implementation of reduced or empirical models into a control platform. Reliability improvement activities include implementation of preventive maintenance schedules; detection of failed sensors/equipment and reconfiguration to continue processing; and systematic development of fault prevention and reconfiguration strategies for the full range of CIGS PV production deposition processes. In-situ sensor development activities have resulted in improved control and indicated the potential for enhanced process status monitoring and control of the deposition processes. Substantial process improvements have been made, including significant improvement in CIGS uniformity, thickness control, efficiency, yield, and throughput. In large measure, these gains have been driven by process optimization, which, in turn, have been enabled by control and reliability improvements due to this PV Manufacturing R&D program. This has resulted in substantial improvements of flexible CIGS PV module performance and efficiency.
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Simpson, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strategies for Energy-Efficient Remodeling: SEER 2003 Case Study Report; February 27, 2003 -- October 31, 2004

Description: The goal of the Strategies for Energy Efficiency in Remodeling (SEER) project is to provide information, based on research and case studies, to remodelers and consumers about opportunities to increase home energy performance. Opportunities to include energy efficiency often arise while undertaking general remodeling work. This case study report examines the technologies, methods, and installation of specific energy efficiency strategies. The information presented here stems from a ''gut rehab'' of a house in rural New Jersey as part of the SEER project through the Building America Existing Buildings Program.
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Drumheller, S. C. & Wiehagen, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Model-based Processing of Micro-cantilever Sensor Arrays

Description: We develop a model-based processor (MBP) for a micro-cantilever array sensor to detect target species in solution. After discussing the generalized framework for this problem, we develop the specific model used in this study. We perform a proof-of-concept experiment, fit the model parameters to the measured data and use them to develop a Gauss-Markov simulation. We then investigate two cases of interest: (1) averaged deflection data, and (2) multi-channel data. In both cases the evaluation proceeds by first performing a model-based parameter estimation to extract the model parameters, next performing a Gauss-Markov simulation, designing the optimal MBP and finally applying it to measured experimental data. The simulation is used to evaluate the performance of the MBP in the multi-channel case and compare it to a ''smoother'' (''averager'') typically used in this application. It was shown that the MBP not only provides a significant gain ({approx} 80dB) in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), but also consistently outperforms the smoother by 40-60 dB. Finally, we apply the processor to the smoothed experimental data and demonstrate its capability for chemical detection. The MBP performs quite well, though it includes a correctable systematic bias error. The project's primary accomplishment was the successful application of model-based processing to signals from micro-cantilever arrays: 40-60 dB improvement vs. the smoother algorithm was demonstrated. This result was achieved through the development of appropriate mathematical descriptions for the chemical and mechanical phenomena, and incorporation of these descriptions directly into the model-based signal processor. A significant challenge was the development of the framework which would maximize the usefulness of the signal processing algorithms while ensuring the accuracy of the mathematical description of the chemical-mechanical signal. Experimentally, the difficulty was to identify and characterize the non-target signals present in the measurement system. In the future, these signals will limit the ability of the ...
Date: November 17, 2004
Creator: Tringe, J W; Clague, D S; Candy, J V; Lee, C L; Rudd, R E & Burnham, A K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Three-Dimensional Modeling of DNAPL in the Subsurface of the 216-Z-9 Trench at the Hanford Site

Description: This work describes numerical modeling for simulating carbon tetrachloride flow and transport as outlined in two DOE reports for the 200-PW-1 Operable Unit and the 200-PW-1, 200-PW-3, and 200-PW-6 Operable Units. Simulations using the multifluid flow model STOMP were conducted to estimate how disposed dense nonaqueous phase liquid migrates in the vadose zone.
Date: November 2, 2004
Creator: Oostrom, Mart; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Last, George V. & Truex, Michael J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recent Applications of SPME in Directed Stockpile Work (FY04)

Description: Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) has been used to sample nonnuclear materials for analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). This report summarizes progress in the areas of individual materials' outgassing signatures, microcompatibility tests and analysis of polar analytes.
Date: November 8, 2004
Creator: Alviso, C; Harvey, C & Vance, A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cost Estimate for Laser Isotope Separation for RIA

Description: Isotope enrichment of some elements is required in support of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) in order to obtain the beam intensities, source efficiencies and/or source lifetime required by RIA. The economics of using Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) technology as well as ElectroMagnetic (EM) separation technology has been evaluated. It is concluded that such an AVLIS would be about 10 times less expensive than a facility based on electromagnetic separation - $17 M versus $170 M. In addition, the AVLIS facility footprint would be about 10 times smaller, and operations would require about 4 years (including 2 years of startup) versus about 11 years for an EM facility.
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Scheibner, K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

H2O Outgassing from Silicones

Description: In this fiscal year, we have tested the H{sub 2}O outgassing model for TR55 against independent core tests performed at different temperatures by our collaborators at Y12. At higher temperature ({approx} 71 C), the model properly predicts moisture outgassing from TR55 over the entire experiment. At lower temperature ({approx} 42.5 C), the model correctly predicts long-term moisture outgassing. However, in short-term limit, a better fit with core tests might be expected when the diffusion effect of H{sub 2}O through the silicone matrix is included into the model in the near future. A lookup table for the moisture content as well as moisture outgassing kinetics for M9787 which have previously been heated to 460K for one day and then exposed to relevant low levels of moisture is also now available as a reference for engineers/technicians in the fields.
Date: November 9, 2004
Creator: Dinh, L N; Maxwell, R S; Schildbach, M A; Balazs, B & McLean II, W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lessons Learned on X-ray Optics Fabrication: Work completed as part of the "Advancing the Technology R&D of Tabletop Mesoscale Nondestructive Characterization" LDRD

Description: A Wolter X-ray optic was the central component of the microscope envisioned to fulfill the imaging requirements of the Characterization SI. After encountering many difficulties and delays, an optic was finally produced that, unfortunately, only partially met its specifications. With the SI halted, and efforts underway to reformulate a LDRD program to support fabrication of X-ray optics, it is useful to examine the previous effort and compile a list of lessons learned during the research.
Date: November 24, 2004
Creator: Pivovaroff, M J; Nederbragt, W W & Martz, H E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

Description: The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: DAVENPORT,J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Statistical Methods and Tools for Uxo Characterization (SERDP Final Technical Report)

Description: The Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) issued a statement of need for FY01 titled Statistical Sampling for Unexploded Ordnance (UXO) Site Characterization that solicited proposals to develop statistically valid sampling protocols for cost-effective, practical, and reliable investigation of sites contaminated with UXO; protocols that could be validated through subsequent field demonstrations. The SERDP goal was the development of a sampling strategy for which a fraction of the site is initially surveyed by geophysical detectors to confidently identify clean areas and subsections (target areas, TAs) that had elevated densities of anomalous geophysical detector readings that could indicate the presence of UXO. More detailed surveys could then be conducted to search the identified TAs for UXO. SERDP funded three projects: those proposed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) (SERDP Project No. UXO 1199), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The projects were closely coordinated to minimize duplication of effort and facilitate use of shared algorithms where feasible. This final report for PNNL Project 1199 describes the methods developed by PNNL to address SERDP's statement-of-need for the development of statistically-based geophysical survey methods for sites where 100% surveys are unattainable or cost prohibitive.
Date: November 15, 2004
Creator: Pulsipher, Brent A.; Gilbert, Richard O.; Wilson, John E.; Hassig, Nancy L.; Carlson, Deborah K.; O'Brien, Robert F. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress Report on the Laboratory Testing of the Bulk Vitrification Cast Refractory

Description: The Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has been used extensively to produce nuclear materials for the U. S. strategic defense arsenal by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste has accumulated in 177 single- and double-shell tanks. Liquid waste recovered from the tanks will be pre-treated to separate the low-activity fraction from the high-level and transuranic wastes. Currently, the DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) is evaluating several options for immobilization of low-activity tank wastes for eventual disposal in a shallow subsurface facility at the Hanford Site. A significant portion of the waste will be converted into immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass with a conventional Joule-heated ceramic melter. In addition to ILAW glass, supplemental treatment technologies are under consideration by the DOE to treat a portion of the low activity waste. The reason for using this alternative treatment technology is to accelerate the overall cleanup mission at the Hanford site. The ORP selected Bulk Vitrification (BV) for further development and testing. Work in FY03 on engineered and large scale tests of the BV process suggested that approximately 0.3 to as much as 3 wt% of the waste stream 99Tc inventory would end up in a soluble form deposited in a vesicular layer located at the top of the BV melt and in the sand used as an insulator after vitrification. In the FY03 risk assessment (RA) (Mann et al., 2003), the soluble Tc salt in the BV waste packages creates a 99Tc concentration peak at early times in the groundwater extracted from a 100-meter down-gradient well. This peak differs from the presently predicted baseline WTP glass performance, which shows an asymptotic rise to a constant release rate. Because of the desire by regulatory agencies to achieve essentially equivalent performance to WTP ...
Date: November 15, 2004
Creator: Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B PETER.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, J V.; Geiszler, Keith N. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site, Interim Change Notice 2

Description: This ICN documents the installation of two additional downgradient monitoring wells and two additional upgradient wells. It updates the monitoring network. The project scientist will provide a schedule change request providing the list of additional wells to the sample scheduler.
Date: November 5, 2004
Creator: Narbutovskih, Susan M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of the effective inelastic p anti-p cross-section for the D0 Run II luminosity measurement

Description: The authors determine the effective inelastic p{bar p} cross-section into the D0 Luminosity Monitor for all run periods prior to September 2004. This number is used to relate the measured inelastic collision rate to the delivered luminosity. The key ingredients are the inelastic p{bar p} cross-section, the Luminosity Monitor efficiency, and the modeling of kinematic distributions for various inelastic processes used to determine the detector acceptance. The resulting value is {sigma}{sub p{bar p},eff} = 46 {+-} 3 mb.
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Edwards, T.; U., /Manchester; Yacoob, S.; Andeen, T.; U., /Northwestern; Begel, M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hohlraum Characterization Milestones

Description: A successful ignition campaign will depend in part upon having highly characterized hohlraums and shells for target assemblies. Regarding holhraums, properties of interest include dimensions, surface features and chemical composition. This report outlines the metrology needs for hohlraums and provides a timeline for capital as well as FTE expenditures through '07. The topics discussed include hohlraum metrology, windows and tenting metrology, with comments on support of other areas including cryo-related development efforts. Although there is a strong interest in non-destructive characterization, this report also investigates the use of destructive techniques for providing critical information for process development and improvement.
Date: November 12, 2004
Creator: Gunther, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recent Flash X-Ray Injector Modeling

Description: The injector of the Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator has a significantly larger than expected beam emittance. A computer modeling effort involving three different injector design codes was undertaken to characterize the FXR injector and determine the cause of the large emittance. There were some variations between the codes, but in general the simulations were consistent and pointed towards a much smaller normalized, rms emittance (36 cm-mr) than what was measured (193 cm-mr) at the exit of the injector using a pepperpot technique. The simulations also indicated that the present diode design was robust with respect to perturbations to the nominal design. Easily detected mechanical alignment/position errors and magnet errors did not lead to appreciable increase in the simulated emittance. The physics of electron emission was not modeled by any of the codes and could be the source of increased emittance. The nominal simulation assumed uniform Child-Langmuir Law emission from the velvet cathode and no shroud emission. Simulations that looked at extreme non-uniform cathode and shroud emission scenarios resulted in doubling of the emittance. An alternative approach was to question the pepperpot measurement. Simulations of the measurement showed that the pepperpot aperture foil could double the emittance with respect to the non-disturbed beam. This leads to a diplomatic explanation of the discrepancy between predicted and measured emittance where the fault is shared. The measured value is too high due to the effect of the diagnostic on the beam and the simulations are too low because of unaccounted cathode and/or shroud emission physics. Fortunately there is a relatively simple experiment that can resolve the emittance discrepancy. If the large measured emittance value is correct, the beam envelope is emittance dominated at modest values of focusing field and beam radius. Measurements of the beam envelope on an imaging foil at the exit of ...
Date: November 10, 2004
Creator: Houck, T; Blackfield, D; Burke, J; Chen, Y; Javedani, J & Paul, A C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Task-parallel Clustering Algorithm for Structured AMR

Description: A new parallel algorithm, based on the Berger-Rigoutsos algorithm for clustering grid points into logically rectangular regions, is presented. The clustering operation is frequently performed in the dynamic gridding steps of structured adaptive mesh refinement (SAMR) calculations. A previous study revealed that although the cost of clustering is generally insignificant for smaller problems run on relatively few processors, the algorithm scaled inefficiently in parallel and its cost grows with problem size. Hence, it can become significant for large scale problems run on very large parallel machines, such as the new BlueGene system (which has {Omicron}(10{sup 4}) processors). We propose a new task-parallel algorithm designed to reduce communication wait times. Performance was assessed using dynamic SAMR re-gridding operations on up to 16K processors of currently available computers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The new algorithm was shown to be up to an order of magnitude faster than the baseline algorithm and had better scaling trends.
Date: November 2, 2004
Creator: Gunney, B N & Wissink, A M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Study of the Ion Hose Instability in the DARHT-II Downstream Transport Region

Description: The second axis of the DARHT flash X-ray facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (''DARHT-II'') is a multiple-pulse, 18.4 MeV, 2 kA induction electron linear accelerator [1]. A train of short ({approx}50 ns) pulses are converted via bremsstrahlung to X-rays, which are then used to make radiographic images at various times (nominally four) during a ''hydrotest'' experiment. The train of pulses is created by carving them out of a two microsecond long macropulse, using a fast switching element called a kicker [2]. The unused portion of the macropulse is absorbed in a beam dump. Thus, upstream of the kicker, two microseconds of beam are transported through a vacuum system roughly sixty meters long. These conditions involve length and, specifically, time scales which are new to the transport of high-current beams. A concern under such conditions are the macroscopic interactions between the electron beam and positive ions created by impact ionization of the residual gas in the vacuum system. Over two microseconds, the ion density can develop to a hundredth or even a tenth of a percent of the beam density--small, to be sure, but large enough to have cumulative effects over such a long transport distance. Two such effects will be considered here: the ion hose instability, where transverse forces conspire to pull the electron beam farther and farther off axis, and background gas focusing, where radial forces (with respect to the beam) change the beam envelope during the course of the macropulse. The former effect can cause beam emittance growth (affecting the ability to focus the beam on the target) and eventually catastrophic beam loss; the latter can cause either serious degradation of the statically tuned final focus on the converter target, or a pinching of the beam on the surface of the main dump to the point where ...
Date: November 11, 2004
Creator: McCarrick, J F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rapid Generation of a Nanocrystal-Labeled Peptide Library for Specific Identification of the Bacterium Clostrium Botulinum

Description: Several peptide libraries containing up to 2 million unique peptide ligands have been synthesized. The peptides are attached onto a 80 micron resin and the length of these peptide ligands ranges from 5 to 9 amino acid residues. Using a novel calorimetric assay, the libraries were screened for binding to the ganglioside-binding domain of Clostridium Tetanus Toxin, a structural similar analog of the Clostridium Botulinum toxin. Several binding peptide sequences were identified, in which the detailed binding kinetics are currently underway using the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique.
Date: November 11, 2004
Creator: Tok, J B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report of the Production and Delivery Subgroup

Description: The Production and Delivery Subgroup was tasked with evaluating the various options that could be used for hydrogen production and delivery in terms of availability/industry readiness, technical and economic barriers, and environmental considerations. Hydrogen can be produced using a variety of feedstocks and conversion technologies. The feedstock options include water, natural gas, coal, petroleum, methanol, ethanol, biomass, and organic waste streams. Ultimately, using these domestic resources we will be able to produce all the hydrogen we will need for the complete conversion of our transportation infrastructure. The various conversion technologies include electrolysis, reforming (principally of natural gas, but also ethanol and methanol), photobiological and photoelectrochemical, biofermentation, pyrolysis and gasification of biomass and coal, high temperature thermochemical, and catalytic membranes. All of these production technologies are being actively researched by DOE's Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT); and other offices within DOE support work that complements the HFCIT Program activities. In addition, private industry is also dedicating significant resources to these efforts. In establishing the California Hydrogen Highway Network (CA H2 Net) we must utilize both distributed (that is, hydrogen that is produced at the point of use) as well as centralized production of hydrogen. Because of technical and economic barriers, most of the technologies for hydrogen production listed above will not become practical for either mode of hydrogen production in large quantities until at least the 2015-2030 timeframe. In the near term, that is, the transitional period between now and 2010 when we will establish a widely available hydrogen fueling infrastructure in California, the distributed production options of reforming and electrolysis will play the dominant role. In addition, production of hydrogen at centralized plants using natural gas reforming and delivery of pressurized or liquefied hydrogen by truck will be utilized. This is a logical extension of the ...
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Glass, R & Zalesky, R
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department