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Final Technical Report

Description: The Net100 project was motivated by complaints from computational scientists and researchers at DOE laboratories who were frequently unable to transfer data across the country at appropriate available bandwidth rates. Many high-performance distributed computing applications transfer large volumes of data over wide area networks and require data rates on the order of gigabits per second. Even though Internet backbone speeds have increased considerably in recent years, distributed applications are rarely able to take full advantage of these new high-capacity networks. The goal of the Net100 project was to try to improve the network performance of scientific applications without requiring the intervention of a network expert. The main objective was to have the operating system dynamically tune network flows so the application and the scientist would not have to be network-aware. The Net100 project sought to accomplish this by augmenting the tools and technology developed as a part of the NSF-sponsored Web100 project.
Date: November 30, 2004
Creator: Brown, Janet; Huntoon, Gwendolyn & Mathis, Matthew
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combined Extraction of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Alkaline Media: An Extension of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Technology

Description: The wastes present at DOE long-term storage sites are usually highly alkaline, and because of this, much of the actinides in these wastes are in the sludge phase. Enough actinide materials still remain in the supernatant liquid that they require separation followed by long-term storage in a geological repository. The removal of these metals from the liquid waste stream would permit their disposal as low-level waste and dramatically reduce the volume of high-level wastes.
Date: November 3, 2004
Creator: Raymond, Kenneth
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

Description: A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline (octane or decane) at low temperature and ambient pressure via treatment with a TAML activator and hydrogen peroxide in a two-phase ...
Date: November 12, 2004
Creator: Collins, Terrence J. & Horwitz, Colin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A comparative analysis of business structures suitable forfarmer-owned wind power projects in the United States

Description: For years, farmers in the United States have looked with envy on their European counterparts' ability to profitably farm the wind through ownership of distributed, utility-scale wind projects. Only within the past few years, however, has farmer- or community-owned wind power development become a reality in the United States. The primary hurdle to this type of development in the United States has been devising and implementing suitable business and legal structures that enable such projects to take advantage of tax-based federal incentives for wind power. This article discusses the limitations of such incentives in supporting farmer- or community-owned wind projects, describes four ownership structures that potentially overcome such limitations, and finally conducts comparative financial analysis on those four structures, using as an example a hypothetical 1.5 MW farmer-owned project located in the state of Oregon. We find that material differences in the competitiveness of each structure do exist, but that choosing the best structure for a given project will largely depend on the conditions at hand; e.g., the ability of the farmer(s) to utilize tax credits, preference for individual versus ''cooperative'' ownership, and the state and utility service territory in which the project will be located.
Date: November 11, 2004
Creator: Bolinger, Mark & Wiser, Ryan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optimizing the Delivery of Short-Lived Alpha Particle-Emitting Isotopes to Solid Tumors

Description: The underlying hypothesis of this project was that optimal alpha emitter-based radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) could be achieved by pairing the physical half-life of the radioisotope to the biological half-life of the targeting vehicle. The project had two specific aims. The first aim was to create and optimize the therapeutic efficacy of 211At-SAPS-C6.5 diabody conjugates. The second aim was to develop bispecific-targeting strategies that increase the specificity and efficacy of alpha-emitter-based RAIT. In the performance of the first aim, we created 211At-SAPS-C6.5 diabody conjugates that specifically targeted the HER2 tumor associated antigen. In evaluating these immunoconjugates we determined that they were capable of efficient tumor targeting and therapeutic efficacy of established human tumor xenografts growing in immunodeficient mice. We also determined that therapeutic doses were associated with late renal toxicity, likely due to the role of the kidneys in the systemic elimination o f these agents. We are currently performing more studies focused on better understanding the observed toxicity. In the second aim, we successfully generated bispecific single-chain Fv (bs-scFv) molecules that co-targeted HER2 and HER3 or HER2 and HER4. The in vitro kinetics and in vivo tumor-targeting properties of these molecules were evaluated. These studies revealed that the bs-scFv molecules selectively localized in vitro on tumor cells that expressed both antigens and were capable of effective tumor localization in in vivo studies.
Date: November 24, 2004
Creator: Adams, Gregory P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biosphere Model Report

Description: The purpose of this report is to document the biosphere model, the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), which describes radionuclide transport processes in the biosphere and associated human exposure that may arise as the result of radionuclide release from the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. The biosphere model is one of the process models that support the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA), TSPA-LA. The ERMYN provides the capability of performing human radiation dose assessments. This report documents the biosphere model, which includes: (1) Describing the reference biosphere, human receptor, exposure scenarios, and primary radionuclides for each exposure scenario (Section 6.1); (2) Developing a biosphere conceptual model using site-specific features, events, and processes (FEPs) (Section 6.2), the reference biosphere (Section 6.1.1), the human receptor (Section 6.1.2), and approximations (Sections 6.3.1.4 and 6.3.2.4); (3) Building a mathematical model using the biosphere conceptual model (Section 6.3) and published biosphere models (Sections 6.4 and 6.5); (4) Summarizing input parameters for the mathematical model, including the uncertainty associated with input values (Section 6.6); (5) Identifying improvements in the ERMYN compared with the model used in previous biosphere modeling (Section 6.7); (6) Constructing an ERMYN implementation tool (model) based on the biosphere mathematical model using GoldSim stochastic simulation software (Sections 6.8 and 6.9); (7) Verifying the ERMYN by comparing output from the software with hand calculations to ensure that the GoldSim implementation is correct (Section 6.10); (8) Validating the ERMYN by corroborating it with published biosphere models; comparing conceptual models, mathematical models, and numerical results (Section 7).
Date: November 8, 2004
Creator: Wu, D.W. & Smith, A.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TOP500 Supercomputers for November 2004

Description: 24th Edition of TOP500 List of World's Fastest Supercomputers Released: DOE/IBM BlueGene/L and NASA/SGI's Columbia gain Top Positions MANNHEIM, Germany; KNOXVILLE, Tenn.; BERKELEY, Calif. In what has become a closely watched event in the world of high-performance computing, the 24th edition of the TOP500 list of the worlds fastest supercomputers was released today (November 8, 2004) at the SC2004 Conference in Pittsburgh, Pa.
Date: November 8, 2004
Creator: Strohmaier, Erich; Meuer, Hans W.; Dongarra, Jack & Simon, Horst D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrective Action Decision Document/ Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

Description: This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the subsurface at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443, CNTA - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). CAU 443 is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, north of U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the corrective action plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for the UC-1 Cavity (Corrective Action Site 58-57-001) at CAU 443, as provided in the FFACO. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (Corrective Action Unit No. 443)'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data into a three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow, and use of the output of the flow model for a transport model of radionuclide release and migration behavior ...
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Evans, Susan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plume Delineation in the BC Cribs and Trenches Area

Description: HydroGEOPHYSICS, Inc. and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were contracted by Fluor Hanford Group, Inc. to conduct a geophysical investigation in the area of the BC Cribs and Trenches (subject site) at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The BC Cribs and Trenches are located south of the 200 East Area. This document provides the details of the investigation to identify existing infrastructure from legacy disposal activities and to delineate the edges of a groundwater plume that contains radiological and heavy metal constituents beneath the 216-B-26 and 216-B-52 Trenches, and the 216-B-14 through 216-B-19 Cribs.
Date: November 30, 2004
Creator: Rucker, Dale F. & Sweeney, Mark D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Statistical Review of DWPF Laboratory Data Including Measurements of the ARG-1 Standard for Batches 94 - 263.

Description: Measurements of calibration and bench standards as well as samples of ARG-1 that were performed by the DWPF Lab during the processing of batches 94 through 263 were provided to SCS for review. Three datasets, one associated with each of three preparation methods (Cold Chem, Mixed Acid, and Fusion) were included in the review. The review conducted covered several areas of investigation. Biases in these measurements relative to the reference values for the standards including ARG-1 were estimated and found to be of no practical concern. Percent relative standard deviations for these data also were determined. Sources of variation in the measurements (i.e., batch-to-batch and within process batch) were estimated and compared. An investigation into evidence of instrument drift during a group of measurements representing a prototypical block was conducted for each preparation method using pairs of calibration and bench standards. No evidence of instrument drift at levels of practical concern was seen in these data. Also, the replicates of calibration standards at the beginning of each analytical block were found to be unnecessary. The uncertainties of the measurements, which incorporated biases and precision errors, were computed for the calibration standards, bench standards, and ARG-1. The limits for these uncertainties were compared to the current, LIMS operating limits for the errors in the measurements of these standards. These comparisons may provide opportunities for revising the LIMS limits. Comparisons between MFT and SME results were made for both the Mixed Acid and the Fusion prep methods. There was no evidence of differences (in either bias or precision) between the results for these two tanks for either of the two prep methods.
Date: November 30, 2004
Creator: THOMAS, EDWARDS
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

Description: The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Magnuson, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Wildfire Behavior Modeling System at Los Alamos National Laboratory for Operational Applications

Description: To support efforts to protect facilities and property at Los Alamos National Laboratory from damages caused by wildfire, we completed a multiyear project to develop a system for modeling the behavior of wildfires in the Los Alamos region. This was accomplished by parameterizing the FARSITE wildfire behavior model with locally gathered data representing topography, fuels, and weather conditions from throughout the Los Alamos region. Detailed parameterization was made possible by an extensive monitoring network of permanent plots, weather towers, and other data collection facilities. We also incorporated a database of lightning strikes that can be used individually as repeatable ignition points or can be used as a group in Monte Carlo simulation exercises and in other randomization procedures. The assembled modeling system was subjected to sensitivity analyses and was validated against documented fires, including the Cerro Grande Fire. The resulting modeling system is a valuable tool for research and management. It also complements knowledge based on professional expertise and information gathered from other modeling technologies. However, the modeling system requires frequent updates of the input data layers to produce currently valid results, to adapt to changes in environmental conditions within the Los Alamos region, and to allow for the quick production of model outputs during emergency operations.
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Koch, S.W. & R.G.Balice
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

Description: The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the disruptive events features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded,'' is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d), (e), and (f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with both seismic and igneous disruptive events, such as fault displacements through the repository and an igneous intrusion into the repository. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). Previous versions of this report were developed to support the total system performance assessments (TSPA) for various prior repository designs. This revision addresses the repository design for the license application (LA).
Date: November 8, 2004
Creator: Sanchez, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-Drift Precipitates/Salts Model

Description: This report documents the development and validation of the in-drift precipitates/salts (IDPS) model. The IDPS model is a geochemical model designed to predict the postclosure effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the chemical composition of water within the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). Application of the model in support of TSPA-LA is documented in ''Engineered Barrier System: Physical and Chemical Environment Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169860]). Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport In-Drift Geochemistry Model Report Integration (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171156]) is the technical work plan (TWP) for this report. It called for a revision of the previous version of the report (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167734]) to achieve greater transparency, readability, data traceability, and report integration. The intended use of the IDPS model is to estimate and tabulate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation, deliquescence, and potential environmental conditions on the pH, ionic strength, and chemical compositions of water and minerals on the drip shield or other location within the drift during the postclosure period. Specifically, the intended use is as follows: (1) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, the effects of evaporation and deliquescence on the presence and composition of water occurring within the repository during the postclosure period (i.e., effects on pH, ionic strength, deliquescence relative humidity, total concentrations of dissolved components in the system Na-K-H-Mg-Ca-Al-Cl-F-NO{sub 3}-SO{sub 4}-Br-CO{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, and concentrations of the following aqueous species that potentially affect acid neutralizing capacity: HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}, H{sup +}, HSO{sub 4}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, CaHCO{sub 3}{sup +}, MgHCO{sub 3}{sup +}, HSiO{sub 3}{sup -}, and MgOH{sup +}); (2) To estimate, within an appropriate level of confidence, mineral precipitation resulting from ...
Date: November 9, 2004
Creator: Mariner, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Completion Report for Well ER-12-2

Description: Well ER-12-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled from November 2002 to January 2003 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology in the northwestern portion of Yucca Flat. The well was drilled to total measured depth of 2,097.9 meters. The 131.1-centimeter-diameter borehole was left open (i.e., uncased) below the base of the intermediate casing at 901.6 meters. A piezometer string was installed outside the surface casing to a depth of 176.4 meters to monitor a zone of perched water. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, sidewall core samples from 7 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated, in descending order, 137.5 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium, 48.8 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks, 289.6 meters of Mississippian Chainman Shale, and 1,622.5 meters of Mississippian and Upper Devonian Eleana Formation consisting of shale, argillite, sandstone, quartzite, and limestone. Forty-seven days after the well was drilled the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 65.43 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 127.14 meters.
Date: November 2004
Creator: Bechtel Nevada
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of Thermal Diffusity and Flow Resistance for TCAP Materials

Description: SRS uses the Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) to separate isotopes of hydrogen. The frequency of thermal cycles is a limit of the productivity of the process and that frequency is largely determined by the thermal diffusivity of the absorbent material. For a given tube diameter, a larger thermal diffusivity decreases the time required for each cycle. In 1998, the Engineering Development Laboratory measured thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity for three TCAP materials in helium.
Date: November 11, 2004
Creator: Steimke, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Benzene Generation Testing for Tank 48H Waste Disposition

Description: In support for the Aggregation option, researchers performed a series of tests using actual Tank 48H slurries. The tests were designed to examine potential benzene generation issues if the Tank 48H slurry is disposed to Saltstone. Personnel used the archived Tank 48H sample (HTF-E-03-127, collected September 17, 2003) for the experiments. The tests included a series of three experiments (Tests A, B, and F) performed in duplicate, giving a total of six experiments. Test A used Tank 48H slurry mixed with approximately 20:1 with Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle from Tanks 21H and 22H. Test B used Tank 48H slurry mixed with approximately 2.7:1 with DWPF Recycle from Tanks 21H and 22H, while Test F used Tank 48H slurry as-is. Tests A and B occurred at 45 degrees C, while Test F occurred at 55 degrees C. Over a period of 8 weeks, personnel collected samples for analysis, once per week. Each sample was tested with the in-cell gamma counter. The researchers noted a decline in the cesium activity in solution which is attributed to temperature dependence of the complex slurry equilibrium. Selected samples were sent to ADS for potassium, boron, and cesium analysis. The benzene generation rate was inferred from the TPB destruction which is indirectly measured by the in-growth of cesium, potassium or boron. The results of all the analyses reveal no discernible in-growth of radiocesium, potassium or boron, indicating no significant tetraphenylborate (TPB) decomposition in any of the experiments. From boron measurements, the inferred rate of TPB destruction remained less than 0.325 mg/(L-h) implying a maximum benzene generation rate of less than 0.332 mg/(L-h)
Date: November 16, 2004
Creator: PETERS, THOMAS
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In situ Removal of Actinides and Strontium from High Level Waste Tanks, Tea Bag versus Adsorption Column

Description: Initiatives are underway at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to accelerate the disposition of the supernate and salt portions of the waste in the SRS High Level Waste (HLW) tank farm system. Significant savings in processing time and overall cost could be achieved by in situ treatment of waste supernate or dissolved salt inside a tank farm waste tank. For treatment of actinides and strontium in waste, the baseline method is sorption onto monosodium titanate (MST), an engineered powder with mean particle size of approximately 10 microns. In a separate study at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), engineered forms of MST were developed and compared on a small (250-mL) scale in batch tests. In the current study, a promising form of engineered MST was tested under two conditions: a traditional ion exchange (or adsorption) column and a porous, flow through device called a tea bag, immersed in solution. Both tests used the same amount of engineered MST to treat 10 L of simulated waste solution containing plutonium and strontium.
Date: November 17, 2004
Creator: MARK, CROWDER
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

VUV Spectroscopy in DIII-D Divertor

Description: The research carried out on this grant was motivated by the high power emission from the CIV doublet at 155 nm in the DIII-D divertor and to study the characteristics of the radiative divertor. The radiative divertor is designed to reduce the heat load to the target plates of the divertor by reducing the energy in the divertor plasma using upstream scrape-off-layer (SOL) radiation. In some cases, particularly in Partially Detached Divertor (PDD) operations, this emission accounts for more than 50% of the total radiation from the divertor. In PDD operation, produced by neutral gas injection, the particle flow to the target plate and the divertor temperature are significantly reduced. A father motivation was to study the CIV emission distribution in the lower, open divertor and the upper baffled divertor. Two Vacuum Ultra Violet Tangential viewing Television cameras (VUV TTV) were constructed and installed in the upper, baffled and the lower, open divertor. The images recorded by these cameras were then inverted to produce two-dimensional distributions of CIV in the poloidal plane. Results obtained in the project are summarized in this report.
Date: November 4, 2004
Creator: Punjabi, Alkesh & Jalufka, Nelson
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Guidelines for Electromagnetic Interference Testing of Power Plant Equipment: Revision 3 to TR-102323

Description: To continue meeting safety and reliability requirements while controlling costs, operators of nuclear power plants must be able to replace and upgrade equipment in a cost-effective manner. One issue that has been problematic for new plant equipment and especially for digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in recent years is electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). The EMC issue usually involves testing to show that critical equipment will not be adversely affected by electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the plant environment. This guide will help nuclear plant engineers address EMC issues and qualification testing in a consistent, comprehensive manner.
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Cunningham, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with Errata

Description: This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 536 is comprised of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS), 03-44-02, Steam Jenny Discharge, and is located in Area 3 of the NTS (Figure 1-2). The CAU was investigated in accordance with the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) and Record of Technical Change (ROTC) No. 1 (NNSA/NV, 2003). The CADD provides or references the specific information necessary to support the recommended corrective action alternative selected to complete closure of the site. The CAU 536, Area 3 Release Site, includes the Steam Jenny Discharge (CAS 03-44-02) that was historically used for steam cleaning equipment in the Area 3 Camp. Concerns at this CAS include contaminants commonly associated with steam cleaning operations and Area 3 Camp activities that include total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), unspecified solvents, radionuclides, metals, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The CAIP for Corrective Action Unit 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NV, 2003), provides additional information relating to the history, planning, and scope of the investigation; therefore, it will not be repeated in this CADD. This CADD identifies potential corrective action alternatives and provides a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the CAS within CAU 536. The evaluation of corrective action alternatives is based on process knowledge and the results of the investigative activities conducted in accordance with the CAIP (NNSA/NV, 2003) that was approved prior to ...
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Boehlecke, Robert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Completion Report for Well ER-7-1

Description: Well ER-7-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in January and February 2003, as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in Yucca Flat. A 47.0-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 541.0 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.8 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 762.0 meters. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 62 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 85.3 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies were conducted on 22 samples of cuttings. The well was collared in Quaternary surficial deposits and penetrated a thick section of Tertiary-age volcanic deposits before terminating in carbonate rocks of Paleozoic-age.
Date: November 2004
Creator: Bechtel Nevada
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Atmospheric Pathway Screening Analysis for Saltstone Disposal Facility Vault 4

Description: A sequential screening process using a methodology developed by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, professional judgment and process knowledge has been used to produce a list of radionuclides requiring detailed analysis to derive disposal limits for the Saltstone Disposal Facility based on the atmospheric pathway.
Date: November 9, 2004
Creator: COOK, JAMES
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final report

Description: In the DOE award, DE-FG02-00ER45823, we have used molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations of the intergranular films (IGFs) present in alumina and silicon nitride materials to address specific questions such as: What is the atomistic structure of the glassy silicate phase? Because of the extremely thin nature of the IGF, do bulk-like glass structure and properties prevail? Does distortion exist in the silicate bonds (which affects bond strength and reactivity) and how is this structure affected by the separation distance between the crystals and/or by the composition of the IGF? Does a structural ordering caused by epitaxial adsorption occur at the IGF/crystal interface? What is the correlation length of this order perpendicular to the interface? How is this ordering affected by composition of the IGF or by the crystals in question? In all simulations, a specific number of ions in stoichiometric ratio were placed as the IGF between two similar crystals, with, in some cases, different crystallographic orientations. The IGF compositions coincided with some of those observed experimentally (calcium aluminosilicate (CAS) glasses in the alumina case, calcium silicon oxy-nitride in the nitride case). The number of ions in the IGF was varied to allow for different thicknesses, although the X and Y dimensions (parallel to the interface) were usually {approx} 50 {angstrom} x 50 {angstrom}. The IGF was melted at a high temperature between the crystals, followed by a slow quench to room temperature, where structural data were collected.
Date: November 12, 2004
Creator: Garofalini, S. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department