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EVALUATING ENVIRONMENTAL DECISION SUPPORT TOOLS.

Description: Effective contaminated land management requires a number of decisions addressing a suite of technical, economic, and social concerns. These concerns include human health risks, ecological risks, economic costs, technical feasibility of proposed remedial actions, and the value society places on clean-up and re-use of formerly contaminated lands. Decision making, in the face of uncertainty and multiple and often conflicting objectives, is a vital and challenging role in environmental management that affects a significant economic activity. Although each environmental remediation problem is unique and requires a site-specific analysis, many of the key decisions are similar in structure. This has led many to attempt to develop standard approaches. As part of the standardization process, attempts have been made to codify specialist expertise into decision support tools. This activity is intended to facilitate reproducible and transparent decision making. The process of codifying procedures has also been found to be a useful activity for establishing and rationalizing management processes. This study will have two primary objectives. The first is to develop taxonomy for Decision Support Tools (DST) to provide a framework for understanding the different tools and what they are designed to address in the context of environmental remediation problems. The taxonomy will have a series of subject areas for the DST. From these subjects, a few key areas will be selected for further study and software in these areas will be identified. The second objective, will be to review the existing DST in the selected areas and develop a screening matrix for each software product.
Date: October 1, 2004
Creator: SULLIVAN, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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DOE Hydrogen Program 2004 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

Description: This document summarizes the project evaluations and comments from the DOE Hydrogen Program 2004 Annual Program Review. Hydrogen production, delivery and storage; fuel cells; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; and education R&D projects funded by DOE in FY2004 are reviewed.
Date: October 1, 2004
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Analyses in Support of Z-IFE: LLNL Progress Report for FY-04

Description: During the last quarter of FY2004, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) conducted a brief study of power plant options for a z-pinch-based inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) power plant. Areas that were covered include chamber design, thick-liquid response, neutronics and activation, and systems studies. This report summarizes the progress made in each of these areas, provides recommendations for improvements to the basic design concept, and identifies future work that is needed. As a starting point to the LLNL studies, we have taken information provided in several publications and presentations. In particular, many of the basic parameters were taken from the ZP-3 study, which is described in reference 4. The ZP-3 design called for 12 separate target chambers, with any 10 of them operating at a given time. Each chamber would be pulsed at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz with a target yield of 3 GJ. Thus, each chamber would have a fusion power of 300 MW for a power plant total of 3000 MW. The ZP-3 study considered several options for the recyclable transmission lines (RTL). Early in the study, the LLNL group questioned the use of many chambers as well as the yield limitation of 3 GJ. The feeling was that a large number of chambers would invariably lead to a considerably higher system cost than for a system with fewer chambers. Naturally, this trend would be somewhat offset by the increased availability that might be possible with many chambers. Reference 4 points out that target yields as high as 20 GJ would be possible with currently available manufacturing technology. The LLNL team considered yields ranging from 3 to 20 GJ. Our findings indicate that higher yields, which lead one to fewer chambers, make the most sense from an economic point of view. Systems modeling, including relative economics, is …
Date: October 6, 2004
Creator: Meier, W; Abbott, R; Latkowski, J; Moir, R; Reyes, S & Schmitt, R
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Determination of collision rates relevant to Weibel-like instability growth rates in classical and non-classical plasmas encountered in fast-ignition experiments

Description: Analytical simulations of fast-electron currents induced by high-density laser-plasma interactions require estimation of various plasma and beam parameters, including temperatures, densities, and collision rates. This note describes a technique used to estimate or calculate these parameters for the case of contemporary multi-terawatt experiments using foil targets as well as for anticipated fast-ignition-scale experiments.
Date: October 18, 2004
Creator: Hill, J M & Key, M H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Evaluation of the Geothermal Public Power Utility Workshops in California

Description: The federal government devotes significant resources to educating consumers and businesses about geothermal energy. Yet little evidence exists for defining the kinds of information needed by the various audiences with specialized needs. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of the Geothermal Municipal Utility Workshops that presented information on geothermal energy to utility resource planners at customer-owned utilities in California. The workshops were sponsored by the Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy's GeoPowering the West Program and were intended to qualitatively assess the information needs of municipal utilities relative to geothermal energy and get feedback for future workshops. The utility workshop participants found the geothermal workshops to be useful and effective for their purposes. An important insight from the workshops is that utilities need considerable lead-time to plan a geothermal project. They need to know whether it is better to own a project or to purchase geothermal electricity from another nonutility owner. California customer-owned utilities say they do not need to generate more electricity to meet demand, but they do need to provide more electricity from renewable resources to meet the requirements of the state's Renewable Portfolio Standard.
Date: October 1, 2004
Creator: Farhar, B. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Simulations and Modeling of Complex Hydrodynamic Flows. Part 2. Single-Mode Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability with Reshock

Description: The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is a fundamental fluid instability that occurs when perturbations on an interface separating gases with different properties grow following the passage of a shock. This instability is typically studied in shock tube experiments, and constitutes a fundamental example of a complex hydrodynamic flow. Numerical simulations and models for the instability growth and evolution have also been used to further understand the physics of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. In the present work, the formally high-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) shock-capturing method using a third-order total-variation diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta time-evolution scheme (as implemented in the HOPE code [57]) is applied to simulate the single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with reshock in two spatial dimensions. The initial conditions and computational domain for the simulations are modeled after the Collins and Jacobs [23] single-mode, Mach 1.21 air(acetone)/SF6 shock tube experiment. The following boundary conditions are used: (1) periodic in the spanwise direction corresponding to the cross-section of the test section; (2) outflow at the entrance of the test section in the streamwise direction, and; (3) reflecting at the end wall of the test section in the streamwise direction. The present investigation has three principal motivations: (1) to provide additional validation of the HOPE code against available experimental data; (2) to provide numerical simulation data for detailed analysis of mixing induced by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with reshock, and; (3) to systematically investigate the dependence of mixing properties on both the order of WENO reconstruction and spatial resolution. The present study constitutes the first comprehensive application of the high-resolution WENO method to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with reshock, as well as analysis of the resulting mixing. First, analytical, semi-analytical, and phenomenological models for the growth of a single- and multi-mode perturbation are reviewed (impulsive, vortex, perturbation, potential flow, and asymptotic power-law growth models), including models for …
Date: October 6, 2004
Creator: Schilling, O & Latini, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Results from Boiling Temperature Measurements for Saturated Solutions in the Systems NaCl + KNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O, NaNO{sub 3} + KNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O, and NaCl + NaNO{sub 3} + KNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O

Description: Boiling temperature measurements have been made for saturated ternary solutions of NaCl + KNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O and NaNO{sub 3} + KNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O over the full solute mole fraction range, along with the limiting binary solutions NaCl + H{sub 2}O, NaNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O, and KNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O. Boiling temperatures have also been measured for the quaternary NaCl + NaNO{sub 3} + KNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O mixtures with KNO{sub 3}:NaNO{sub 3} mole ratios of 1.01 and 1.19, which corresponding to the eutectic ratio and a near-eutectic ratio for the NaNO{sub 3} + KNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O subsystem. The maximum boiling temperature found for the NaCl + KNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O system is 134 C and for the NaNO{sub 3} + KNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O system is 160 C, but boiling temperatures as high as 196 C were measured the NaCl + NaNO{sub 3} + KNO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O system. These mixture compositions correspond to the major mineral assemblages that are predicted to control the deliquescence relative humidity of salts found by leaching dust samples from the proposed nuclear repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.
Date: October 4, 2004
Creator: Rard, J A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Dangerous Waste Characteristics of Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed Wastes from Hanford Tanks

Description: This report summarizes existing analytical data gleaned from samples taken from the Hanford tanks designated as potentially containing transuranic mixed process wastes. Process knowledge of the wastes transferred to these tanks has been reviewed to determine whether the dangerous waste characteristics now assigned to all Hanford underground storage tanks are applicable to these particular wastes. Supplemental technologies are being examined to accelerate the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission and accomplish waste treatment safely and efficiently. To date, 11 Hanford waste tanks have been designated as potentially containing contact-handled (CH) transuranic mixed (TRUM) wastes. The CH-TRUM wastes are found in single-shell tanks B-201 through B-204, T-201 through T-204, T-104, T-110, and T-111. Methods and equipment to solidify and package the CH-TRUM wastes are part of the supplemental technologies being evaluated. The resulting packages and wastes must be acceptable for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The dangerous waste characteristics being considered include ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, and toxicity arising from the presence of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol at levels above the dangerous waste threshold. The analytical data reviewed include concentrations of sulfur, sulfate, cyanide, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, total organic carbon, and oxalate; the composition of the tank headspace, pH, and mercury. Differential scanning calorimetry results were used to determine the energetics of the wastes as a function of temperature. This report supercedes and replaces PNNL-14832.
Date: October 5, 2004
Creator: Tingey, Joel M.; Bryan, Garry H. & Deschane, Jaquetta R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Methods for Calibrating Basin-Wide Hydroacoustic Propagation in the Indian Ocean

Description: This collaborative project was designed to test and compare methods for achieving full ocean basin propagation of hydroacoustic signals in the 5-100 Hz frequency band. Plans for a systematic calibration of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for nuclear testing were under consideration in 2000/2001. The results from this project provide information to guide such planning for future ocean basin calibration work. Several acoustic source types were tested during two sea-going experiments and most were successful at generating signals that propagated hundreds to thousands of km to be recorded at the Indian Ocean IMS hydrophone stations. Development and numerical modeling of imploding glass sphere sources was one component of this testing. The intent was to design a relatively simple-to-use source that is not subject to restrictions that can limit use of explosive charges, but whose signal is large enough to propagate 100-1000's km range. Analysis of IMS hydrophone data recording during the experiments was used to illustrate the extent of energy loss during signal propagation and to assess the accuracy with which the small acoustic sources could be located using methods typically employed for nuclear monitoring.
Date: October 11, 2004
Creator: Blackman, D; de Groot-Hedlin, C; Orcutt, J A; Harben, P H; Clarke, D B & Ramirez, A L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Dimensional Measurements of Three Tubes by Computed Tomography

Description: Low density polyethylene (LDPE), copper (Cu), and gold (Au) tubes were scanned on KCAT to identify and evaluate the impact of phase effects on quantitative object recovery. These tubes are phantoms for high energy density capsules.[Logan, et al. 2004] Digital radiographs for each tube are shown in Figure 1. The LDPE tube was scanned at 60 kV, while the Cu and the Au tubes were scanned at 140 kV. All tubes were scanned at a magnification of 3, with approximately 100-mm distance between the exit plane of the tube and the scintillator. Notice the prominence of the outer bright and inner dark edges for the LDPE tube DR, and their absence from the Cu and Au tube DRs. The bright and dark edges are a result of change in phase of the x-rays. The x-ray fluence is partly attenuated and partly refracted. The location near the outer edge of the tube appears to be more attenuating since those x-rays have refracted to locations just outside the tube. Alternatively, the added counts from the refraction result in intensities that are greater than the incident intensity effectively representing a ''negative attenuation''. This results in more counts in that location than in the incident intensity image violating the ''positive-definite'' requirement for standard CT reconstruction methodologies. One aspect of our CT processing techniques remove some of this signal on the outside of the object. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the accuracy of our dimensional measurement methods for mesoscale object inspection.
Date: October 5, 2004
Creator: Schneberk, D. J.; Martz, H. E. Jr. & Brown, W. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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FY 2004 Infrared Photonics Final Report

Description: Research done by the Infrared Photonics team at PNNL is focused on developing miniaturized integrated optics for the MWIR and LWIR by exploiting the unique optical and material properties of chalcogenide glass. PNNL has developed thin film deposition capabilities, direct-laser writing techniques, IR photonic device demonstration, holographic optical element design and fabrication, photonic device modeling, and advanced optical metrology - all specific to chalcogenide glass. Chalcogenide infrared photonics provides a pathway to Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) transmitter miniaturization. QCLs provide a viable infrared laser source for a new class of laser transmitters capable of meeting the performance requirements for a variety of national security sensing applications. The high output power, small size, and superb stability and modulation characteristics of QCLs make them amenable for integration as transmitters into ultra-sensitive, ultra-selective point sampling and remote short-range chemical sensors that are particularly useful for nuclear nonproliferation missions.
Date: October 1, 2004
Creator: Anheier, Norman C.; Allen, Paul J.; Keller, Paul E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Martin, Peter M.; Johnson, Bradley R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Foundations for Improvements to Passive Detection Systems - Final Report

Description: This project explores the scientific foundation and approach for improving passive detection systems for plutonium and highly enriched uranium in real applications. Sources of gamma-ray radiation of interest were chosen to represent a range of national security threats, naturally occurring radioactive materials, industrial and medical radiation sources, and natural background radiation. The gamma-ray flux emerging from these sources, which include unclassified criticality experiment configurations as surrogates for nuclear weapons, were modeled in detail. The performance of several types of gamma-ray imaging systems using Compton scattering were modeled and compared. A mechanism was created to model the combine sources and background emissions and have the simulated radiation ''scene'' impinge on a model of a detector. These modeling tools are now being used in various projects to optimize detector performance and model detector sensitivity in complex measuring environments. This study also developed several automated algorithms for isotope identification from gamma-ray spectra and compared these to each other and to algorithms already in use. Verification testing indicates that these alternative isotope identification algorithms produced less false positive and false negative results than the ''GADRAS'' algorithms currently in use. In addition to these algorithms that used binned spectra, a new approach to isotope identification using ''event mode'' analysis was developed. Finally, a technique using muons to detect nuclear material was explored.
Date: October 7, 2004
Creator: Labov, S E; Pleasance, L; Sokkappa, P; Craig, W; Chapline, G; Frank, M et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Possible Laminographic and Tomosynthesis Applications for Wolter Microscope Scan Geometries

Description: The Wolter microscope includes a number of attractive features for x-ray imaging, and possible connections to laminographic and tomosynthesis 3D object recovery algorithms. This type of instrument employs x-ray optics to sift out single energy x-rays from a broader spectral energy source, and direct those x-rays to a ''focus plane'' similar to the operation of a optical microscope (see Figure 1 for schematic of a Wolter instrument). Unlike optical microscopes the 3D object can be thick in the direction of the x-rays and in this case more of the intensity of the image is affected by the out-of-focus planes, since the ray-paths span the entire depth of the object. It is clear that the ''in-focus'' plane of a Wolter contain more 3D information than a simple ''point-projection'' radiograph. However, it is not clear just how the impact of the out-of-focus planes obscures or distorts features of interest for the in-focus planes. Further, it is not clear just how object positioning can be combined with multiple acquisitions to enable recovery of other planes within the object function or the entire object function. Of particular interest here are Wolter microscopes configured for mesoscale objects (mm extent with um features). Laminographic and tomosynthesis scanning methods can be strategic for this type of inspection instrument. First, photon output for inspection purposes can be meager in this type of ''small field of view'' system. With laboratory x-ray sources a single image can require up to 10 minutes to accumulate adequate signal. Techniques that can obtain 3D object information from small numbers of views, rotational or translational, are consequently at a premium. Laminographic and tomosynthesis scanning methods require relatively small numbers of views (2-30). Secondly, the Wolter microscope scan geometry in a single view is a fit with the type of source-detector geometry achieved through source-object-detector …
Date: October 5, 2004
Creator: Schneberk, D; Jackson, J & Martz, H
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Transverse instability at the recycler ring

Description: Sporadic transverse instabilities have been observed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring leading to increase in transverse emittances and beam loss. The driving source of these instabilities has been attributed to the resistive-wall impedance with space-charge playing an important role in suppressing Landau damping. Growth rates of the instabilities are computed. Remaining problems are discussed.
Date: October 1, 2004
Creator: Ng, K. Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Comparison of Electron Cloud Simulation and Experiments in the High-Current Experiment

Description: A set of experiments has been performed on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) facility at LBNL, in which the ion beam is allowed to collide with an end plate and thereby induce a copious supply of desorbed electrons. Through the use of combinations of biased and grounded electrodes positioned in between and downstream of the quadrupole magnets, the flow of electrons upstream into the magnets can be turned on or off. Properties of the resultant ion beam are measured under each condition. The experiment is modeled via a full three-dimensional, two species (electron and ion) particle simulation, as well as via reduced simulations (ions with appropriately chosen model electron cloud distributions, and a high-resolution simulation of the region adjacent to the end plate). The three-dimensional simulations are the first of their kind and the first to make use of a timestep-acceleration scheme that allows the electrons to be advanced with a timestep that is not small compared to the highest electron cyclotron period. The simulations reproduce qualitative aspects of the experiments, illustrate some unanticipated physical effects, and serve as an important demonstration of a developing simulation capability.
Date: October 7, 2004
Creator: Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S; Molvik, A; Bieniosek, F et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Canyon Disposal Initiative - Numerical Modeling of Contaminant Transport from Grouted Residual Waste in the 221-U Facility (U Plant)

Description: This letter report documents initial numerical analyses conducted by PNNL to provide support for a feasibility study on decommissioning of the canyon buildings at Hanford. The 221-U facility is the first of the major canyon buildings to be decommissioned. The specific objective of this modeling effort was to provide estimates of potential rates of migration of residual contaminants out of the 221-U facility during the first 40 years after decommissioning. If minimal contaminant migration is predicted to occur from the facility during this time period, then the structure may be deemed to provide a level of groundwater protection that is essentially equivalent to the liner and leachate collection systems that are required at conventional landfills. The STOMP code was used to simulate transport of selected radionuclides out of a canyon building, representative of the 221-U facility after decommissioning, for a period of 40 years. Simulation results indicate that none of the selected radionuclides that were modeled migrated beyond the concrete structure of the facility during the 40-year period of interest. Jacques (2001) identified other potential contaminants in the 221-U facility that were not modeled, however, including kerosene, phenol, and various metals. Modeling of these contaminants was beyond the scope of this preliminary effort due to increased complexity. Simulation results indicate that contaminant release from the canyon buildings will be diffusion controlled at early times. Advection is expected to become much more important at later times, after contaminants have diffused out of the facility and into the surrounding soil environment. After contaminants have diffused out of the facility, surface infiltration covers will become very important for mitigating further transport of contaminants in the underlying vadose zone and groundwater.
Date: October 12, 2004
Creator: Rockhold, Mark L.; White, Mark D. & Freeman, Eugene J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Simulations of Turbulence Induced Ellipticity Over Large Fields-of-View: The First Step Towards Enabling LSST Weak Lensing Science

Description: Atmospheric turbulence can mimic the effects of weak lensing in astronomical images, so it is necessary to understand to what degree turbulence affects weak lensing measurements. In particular, we studied the ellipticity induced upon the point-spread functions (PSFs) of a grid of simulated stars separated by distances (d {approx} 1{prime}) that will be characteristic of Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) images. We observe that atmospherically induced ellipticity changes on small scales (d < 0.5{prime}) and use linear interpolation between stars separated by d = 0.5{prime} to determine the induced ellipticity everywhere in the field-of-view.
Date: October 11, 2004
Creator: Schlaufman, K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Derivation Of Probabilistic Damage Definitions From High Fidelity Deterministic Computations

Description: This paper summarizes a methodology used by the Underground Analysis and Planning System (UGAPS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the derivation of probabilistic damage curves for US Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM). UGAPS uses high fidelity finite element and discrete element codes on the massively parallel supercomputers to predict damage to underground structures from military interdiction scenarios. These deterministic calculations can be riddled with uncertainty, especially when intelligence, the basis for this modeling, is uncertain. The technique presented here attempts to account for this uncertainty by bounding the problem with reasonable cases and using those bounding cases as a statistical sample. Probability of damage curves are computed and represented that account for uncertainty within the sample and enable the war planner to make informed decisions. This work is flexible enough to incorporate any desired damage mechanism and can utilize the variety of finite element and discrete element codes within the national laboratory and government contractor community.
Date: October 26, 2004
Creator: Leininger, L D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Study of Fish Response Using Particle Image Velocimetry and High-Speed, High-Resolution Imaging

Description: Existing literature of previous particle image velocimetry (PIV) studies of fish swimming has been reviewed. Historically, most of the studies focused on the performance evaluation of freely swimming fish. Technological advances over the last decade, especially the development of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) technique, make possible more accurate, quantitative descriptions of the flow patterns adjacent to the fish and in the wake behind the fins and tail, which are imperative to decode the mechanisms of drag reduction and propulsive efficiency. For flows generated by different organisms, the related scales and flow regimes vary significantly. For small Reynolds numbers, viscosity dominates; for very high Reynolds numbers, inertia dominates, and three-dimensional complexity occurs. The majority of previous investigations dealt with the lower end of Reynolds number range. The fish of our interest, such as rainbow trout and spring and fall chinook salmon, fall into the middle range, in which neither viscosity nor inertia is negligible, and three-dimensionality has yet to dominate. Feasibility tests have proven the applicability of PIV to flows around fish. These tests have shown unsteady vortex shedding in the wake, high vorticity region and high stress region, with the highest in the pectoral area. This evident supports the observations by Nietzel et al. (2000) and Deng et al. (2004) that the operculum are most vulnerable to damage from the turbulent shear flow, because they are easily pried open, and the large vorticity and shear stress can lift and tear off scales, rupture or dislodge eyes, and damage gills. In addition, the unsteady behavior of the vortex shedding in the wake implies that injury to fish by the instantaneous flow structures would likely be much higher than the injury level estimated using the average values of the dynamics parameters. Based on existing literature, our technological capability, and relevance and …
Date: October 23, 2004
Creator: Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R. & Mueller, Robert P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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LER Data Mining Pilot Study Final Report

Description: LERs consist of a one page standard form with a standard header and free text data, followed by additional continuation pages of free text data. Currently this LER data is analyzed by first inputting the heading and text data manually into a categorical relational database. The data is then evaluated by enumeration of data in various categories and supplemented by review of individual LERs. This is labor intensive and makes it difficult to relate specific descriptive text to enumerated results. State of the art data mining and visualization technology exists that can eliminate the need for manual categorization, maintain the text relationships within each report, produce the same enumerated results currently available, and provide a tool to support potentially useful additional analysis of the informational content of LERs in a more timely and cost effective manner.
Date: October 15, 2004
Creator: Young, Jonathan; Zentner, Michael D. & McQuerry, Dennis L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Northern Power Systems WindPACT Drive Train Alternative Design Study Report; Period of Performance: April 12, 2001 to January 31, 2005

Description: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) project seeks to advance wind turbine technology by exploring innovative concepts in drivetrain design. A team led by Northern Power Systems (Northern) of Waitsfield, Vermont, was chosen to perform this work. Conducted under subcontract YCX-1-30209-02, project objectives are to identify, design, and test a megawatt (MW)-scale drivetrain with the lowest overall life cycle cost. The project entails three phases: preliminary study of alternative drivetrain designs (Phase I), detailed design development (Phase II), and proof of concept fabrication and test (Phase III). This report summarizes the results of the preliminary design study (Phase I).
Date: October 1, 2004
Creator: Bywaters, G.; John, V.; Lynch, J.; Mattila, P.; Norton, G.; Stowell, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbines; Period of Performance: October 31, 2002--January 31, 2003

Description: Wind Tunnel Aerodynamic Tests of Six Airfoils for Use on Small Wind Turbinesrepresents the fourth installment in a series of volumes documenting the ongoing work of th University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Low-Speed Airfoil Tests Program. This particular volume deals with airfoils that are candidates for use on small wind turbines, which operate at low Reynolds numbers.
Date: October 1, 2004
Creator: Selig, M. S. & McGranahan, B. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Interim Status Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Low-Level Waste Management Areas 1 to 4, RCRA Facilities, Hanford,Washington

Description: This document describes the monitoring plan to meet the requirements for interim status groundwater monitoring at Hanford Site low-level waste burial grounds as specified by 40 CFR 265, incorporated by reference in WAC 173-303-400. The monitoring will take place at four separate low-level waste management areas in the 200-West and 200-East Areas, in the central part of the site. This plan replaces the previous monitoring plan.
Date: October 25, 2004
Creator: Dresel, P Evan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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