7,360 Matching Results

Search Results

Prediction of Corrosion of Alloys in Mixed-Solvent Environments

Description: Corrosion is much less predictable in organic or mixed-solvent environments than in aqueous process environments. As a result, US chemical companies face greater uncertainty when selecting process equipment materials to manufacture chemical products using organic or mixed solvents than when the process environments are only aqueous. Chemical companies handle this uncertainty by overdesigning the equipment (wasting money and energy), rather than by accepting increased risks of corrosion failure (personnel hazards and environmental releases). Therefore, it is important to develop simulation tools that would help the chemical process industries to understand and predict corrosion and to develop mitigation measures. To create such tools, we have developed models that predict (1) the chemical composition, speciation, phase equilibria, component activities and transport properties of the bulk (aqueous, nonaqueous or mixed) phase that is in contact with the metal; (2) the phase equilibria and component activities of the alloy phase(s) that may be subject to corrosion and (3) the interfacial phenomena that are responsible for corrosion at the metal/solution or passive film/solution interface. During the course of this project, we have completed the following: (1) Development of thermodynamic modules for calculating the activities of alloy components; (2) Development of software that generates stability diagrams for alloys in aqueous systems; these diagrams make it possible to predict the tendency of metals to corrode; (3) Development and extensive verification of a model for calculating speciation, phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties of mixed-solvent electrolyte systems; (4) Integration of the software for generating stability diagrams with the mixed-solvent electrolyte model, which makes it possible to generate stability diagrams for nonaqueous or mixed-solvent systems; (5) Development of a model for predicting diffusion coefficients in mixed-solvent electrolyte systems; (6) Development of fundamentals of a detailed kinetic model of general corrosion, which includes a detailed treatment of local chemistry changes near ...
Date: June 5, 2003
Creator: A. Anderko, P. Wang, R. D. Young, D. P. Riemer, P. McKenzie and M. M. Lencka (OLI Systems Inc.) & Laboratory), S. S. Babu and P. Angelini (Oak Ridge National
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Report Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technology Phase Ii Animas Valley, New Mexico

Description: Final Technical Report covering siting, permitting, and drilling two geothermal temperature gradient holes. This report provides a summary of geotechnical and geophysical data that led to the siting, drilling, and completion of 2 temperature gradient holes in the geothermal anomaly at Lightning Dock Known Geothermal Resource Area in the Animas Valley of New Mexico. Included in this report is a summary of institutional factors and data defining the well drilling process and acquiring drilling permits. Data covering the results of the drilling and temperature logging of these two holes are provided. The two gradient holes were sited on federal geothermal leases owned by Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. and both holes were drilled into lakebed sediments some distance from the intense shallow geothermal anomaly located in the eastern half of Section 7, Township 25 South, Range 19 West.
Date: December 29, 2003
Creator: A.Cunniff, Roy & Bowers, Roger L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated Microsensors for Autonomous Microrobots

Description: This report describes the development of a miniature mobile microrobot device and several microsystems needed to create a miniature microsensor delivery platform. This work was funded under LDRD No.10785, entitled, ''Integrated Microsensors for Autonomous Microrobots''. The approach adopted in this project was to develop a mobile platform, to which would be attached wireless RF remote control and data acquisition in addition to various microsensors. A modular approach was used to produce a versatile microrobot platform and reduce power consumption and physical size.
Date: February 1, 2003
Creator: ADKINS, DOUGLAS R.; BYRNE, RAYMOND H.; HELLER, EDWIN J. & WOLF, JIMMIE V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Deployment of a Continuously Operated {mu}ChemLab

Description: A continuously operating prototype chemical weapons sensor system based on the {mu}ChemLab{trademark} technology was installed in the San Francisco International Airport in late June 2002. This prototype was assembled in a National Electric Manufacturers Association (NEMA) enclosure and controlled by a personal computer collocated with it. Data from the prototype was downloaded regularly and periodic calibration tests were performed through modem-operated control. The instrument was installed just downstream of the return air fans in the return air plenum of a high-use area of a boarding area. A CW Sentry, manufactured by Microsensor Systems, was installed alongside the {mu}ChemLab unit and results from its operation are reported elsewhere. Tests began on June 26, 2002 and concluded on October 16, 2002. This report will discuss the performance of the prototype during the continuous testing period. Over 70,000 test cycles were performed during this period. Data from this first field emplacement have indicated several areas where engineering improvements can be made for future field emplacement.
Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: ADKINS, DOUGLAS R.; KOTTENSTETTE, RICHARD; LEWIS, PATRICK R.; DULLECK JR., GEORGE R.; OBORNY, MICHAEL C.; GORDON, SUSANNA P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Review of Test Facilities for Distributed Energy Resources

Description: Since initiating research on integration of distributed energy resources (DER) in 1999, the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) has been actively assessing and reviewing existing DER test facilities for possible demonstrations of advanced DER system integration concepts. This report is a compendium of information collected by the CERTS team on DER test facilities during this period.
Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: AKHIL,ABBAS ALI; MARNAY,CHRIS & KIPMAN,TIMOTHY
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ENERGY SAVINGS POTENTIALS IN RESIDENTIAL AND SMALL COMMERCIAL THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS - AN UPDATE

Description: This is an update of a report (Andrews and Modera 1991) that quantified the amounts of energy that could be saved through better thermal distribution systems in residential and small commercial buildings. Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork, piping, or other means used to transport heat or cooling from the space-conditioning equipment to the conditioned space. This update involves no basic change in methodology relative to the 1991 report, but rather a review of the additional information available in 2003 on the energy-use patterns in residential and small commercial buildings.
Date: October 31, 2003
Creator: ANDREWS,J. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A HISTORY OF ASHRAE STANDARDS 152P.

Description: The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) has been developing a standard test method for evaluating the efficiency of ducts and other types of thermal distribution systems in single-family residential buildings. This report presents an overview of the structure, function, and historical development of this test method.
Date: October 31, 2003
Creator: ANDREWS,J. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EFFECT OF AIRFLOW AND HEAT INPUT RATES ON DUCT EFFICIENCY.

Description: Reducing the airflow and heat input rates of a furnace that is connected to a duct system in thermal contact with unconditioned spaces can significantly reduce thermal distribution efficiency. This is a straightforward theoretical calculation based on the increased residence time of the air in the duct at the lower flow rate, which results in greater conduction losses. Experimental tests in an instrumented residential-size duct system have confirmed this prediction. Results are compared with the heat-loss algorithm in ASHRAE Standid 152P. The paper concludes with a discussion of possible remedies for this loss of efficiency in existing systems and optional design strategies in new construction.
Date: May 28, 2003
Creator: ANDREWS,J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LABORATORY EVALUATION OF THE DELTA Q TEST FOR DUCT LEAKAGE

Description: Using a residential-size duct system in a controlled laboratory setting, the repeatability and accuracy of the Delta Q test for air leakage in residential duct systems have been measured. More than 100 Delta Q tests were performed. These were compared with results using fan pressurization and also with results of a procedure (Delta Q Plus) that uses leakage hole-size information to select the leakage pressures to be used in the Delta Q algorithm. The average error in supply or return leakage for the fan-pressurization test was 6.4% of system fan flow. For the Delta Q test it was 3.4% of fan flow, while for Delta Q Plus it was 1.9% of fan flow.
Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: ANDREWS,J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Blade Manufacturing Improvement: Remote Blade Manufacturing Demonstration

Description: The objective of this program was to investigate manufacturing improvements for wind turbine blades. The program included a series of test activities to evaluate the strength, deflection, performance, and loading characteristics of the prototype blades. The original contract was extended in order to continue development of several key blade technologies identified in the project. The objective of the remote build task was to demonstrate the concept of manufacturing wind turbine blades at a temporary manufacturing facility in a rural environment. TPI Composites successfully completed a remote manufacturing demonstration in which four blades were fabricated. The remote demonstration used a manufacturing approach which relied upon material ''kits'' that were organized in the factory and shipped to the site. Manufacturing blades at the wind plant site presents serious logistics difficulties and does not appear to be the best approach. A better method appears to be regional manufacturing facilities, which will eliminate most of the transportation cost, without incurring the logistical problems associated with fabrication directly onsite. With this approach the remote facilities would use commonly available industrial infrastructure such as enclosed workbays, overhead cranes, and paved staging areas. Additional fatigue testing of the M20 root stud design was completed with good results. This design provides adhesive bond strength under fatigue loading that exceeds that of the fastener. A new thru-stud bonding concept was developed for the M30 stud design. This approach offers several manufacturing advantages; however, the test results were inconclusive.
Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: ASHWILL, THOMAS D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cost Study for Large Wind Turbine Blades

Description: The cost study for large wind turbine blades reviewed three blades of 30 meters, 50 meters, and 70 meters in length. Blade extreme wind design loads were estimated in accordance with IEC Class I recommendations. Structural analyses of three blade sizes were performed at representative spanwise stations assuming a stressed shell design approach and E-glass/vinylester laminate. A bill of materials was prepared for each of the three blade sizes using the laminate requirements prepared during the structural analysis effort. The labor requirements were prepared for twelve major manufacturing tasks. TPI Composites developed a conceptual design of the manufacturing facility for each of the three blade sizes, which was used for determining the cost of labor and overhead (capital equipment and facilities). Each of the three potential manufacturing facilities was sized to provide a constant annual rated power production (MW per year) of the blades it produced. The cost of the production tooling and overland transportation was also estimated. The results indicate that as blades get larger, materials become a greater proportion of total cost, while the percentage of labor cost is decreased. Transportation costs decreased as a percentage of total cost. The study also suggests that blade cost reduction efforts should focus on reducing material cost and lowering manufacturing labor, because cost reductions in those areas will have the strongest impact on overall blade cost.
Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: ASHWILL, THOMAS D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Innovative Design Approaches for Large Wind Turbine Blades

Description: The primary goal of the WindPACT Blade System Design Study (BSDS) was investigation and evaluation of design and manufacturing issues for wind turbine blades in the one to ten megawatt size range. The initial project task was to assess the fundamental physical and manufacturing issues that govern and constrain large blades and entails three basic elements: (1) a parametric scaling study to assess blade structure using current technology, (2) an economic study of the cost to manufacture, transport, and install large blades, and (3) identification of promising innovative design approaches that show potential for overcoming fundamental physical and manufacturing constraints. This report discusses several innovative design approaches and their potential for blade cost reduction. During this effort we reviewed methods for optimizing the blade cross-section to improve structural and manufacturing characteristics. We also analyzed and compared a number of composite materials and evaluated their relative merits for use in large wind turbine blades in the range from 30 meters to 70 meters. The results have been summarized in dimensional and non-dimensional format to aid in interpretation. These results build upon earlier parametric and blade cost studies, which were used as a guide for the innovative design approaches explored here.
Date: March 1, 2003
Creator: ASHWILL, THOMAS D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Volatile organic compounds in indoor air: A review ofconcentrations measured in North America since 1990

Description: Central tendency and upper limit concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) measured in indoor air are summarized and reviewed. Data were obtained from published cross-sectional studies of residential and office buildings conducted in North America from 1990through the present. VOC concentrations in existing residences reported in 12 studies comprise the majority of the data set. Central tendency and maximum concentrations are compared between new and existing residences and between existing residences and office buildings. Historical changes in indoor VOC concentrations since the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 are explored by comparing the current data set with two published reviews of previous data obtained primarily in the 1980s. These historical comparisons suggest average indoor concentrations of some toxic air contaminants, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane have decreased.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: ATHodgson@lbl.gov
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser Hazard Analysis for Ultra-Fast Sub-Nanosecond, Mode-Locked Near Infrared Lasers Operated with Pulse Repetition Frequencies Above the Critical Frequency

Description: Ultra fast, sub-nanosecond (picosecond to femtosecond) duration, laser pulses present unique challenges when performing laser safety analysis involving mode-locked lasers, which operate at pulse repetition frequencies above the critical frequency in the near infrared wavelength bands. Two specific cases are presented, one such case that agrees and one that disagrees with the general rule on critical frequency. The results show that in all cases the appropriate maximum permissible exposure is always the smallest of the values calculated from ANSI rule 1, 2 and 3.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: AUGUSTONI, ARNOLD L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser Safety and Hazard Analysis for the Trailer (B70) Based AURA Laser System

Description: A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the AURA laser system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standards Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1, for ''Safe Use of Lasers'' and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for ''Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors''. The trailer based AURA laser system is a mobile platform, which is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites. The trailer (B70) based AURA laser system is generally operated on the United State Air Force Starfire Optical Range (SOR) at Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB), New Mexico. The laser is used to perform laser interaction testing inside the laser trailer as well as outside the trailer at target sites located at various distances from the exit telescope. In order to protect personnel, who work inside the Nominal Hazard Zone (NHZ), from hazardous laser emission exposures it was necessary to determine the Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) for each laser wavelength (wavelength bands) and calculate the appropriate minimum Optical Density (OD{sub min}) of the laser safety eyewear used by authorized personnel and the Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance (NOHD) to protect unauthorized personnel who may have violated the boundaries of the control area and enter into the laser's NHZ.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: AUGUSTONI, ARNOLD L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser Safety and Hazardous Analysis for the ARES (Big Sky) Laser System

Description: A laser safety and hazard analysis was performed for the ARES laser system based on the 2000 version of the American National Standards Institute's (ANSI) Standard Z136.1,for Safe Use of Lasers and the 2000 version of the ANSI Standard Z136.6, for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The ARES laser system is a Van/Truck based mobile platform, which is used to perform laser interaction experiments and tests at various national test sites.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: AUGUSTONI, ARNOLD L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser Safety Audit and Inventory System Database

Description: A laser safety auditing and inventory system has been in use at Sandia National Laboratories--Albuquerque for the past five years and has recently been considered for adoption by Sandia National Laboratories--Livermore. The system utilizes the ''Microsoft Access'' database application, part of the Office 2000 software package. Audit and inventory data is available on-line for ready access by laser users. Data is updated weekly to provide users with current information relating to laser facility audits and laser inventories.
Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: AUGUSTONI, ARNOLD L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Domestic Energy Scenarios

Description: This report attempts to organize and evaluate scenarios of markets and technologies that could impact renewable and distributed electricity-generating technologies during the next 20-100 years in the United States. For the purposes of this report, scenarios are defined broadly as any projection or forecast that helps illuminate the potential of Renewable Electric Technologies (RETs) in the United States. Scenarios vary widely in terms of their scope-some focus on supply of fuels or narrow segments of markets with limited timeframes, while others are broader in scope and time span. There are several factors that influence the market penetration of renewable energy and distributed generation technologies. Most notable among these are natural gas prices, technology improvements, and policy measures. Natural gas prices are important because most new generating capacity, as well as marginal generation units, generally are natural-gas fired. Assumptions about the rate of improvement in renewable and distributed generation technologies can also have a significant impact on market penetration. Finally, policy measures that support these technologies, such as tax credits or interconnection standards, can contribute to their accelerated adoption.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Aabakken, J. & Short, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Sampling FY03 Annual Report - Understanding the Movement of Mercury on the INEEL

Description: Environmental mercury measurements were started in Fy-01 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) to monitor downwind impacts from on-going waste treatment operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) and to improve our scientific understanding of mercury fate and transport in this region. This document provides a summary of the sampling done in FY04. Continuous total gaseous mercury (TGM) measurements were made using a Tekran Model 2537A mercury vapor analyzer during October 2002 and from February through July 2003. The equipment was deployed in a self-contained field trailer at the Experimental Field Station (EFS) four kilometers downwind (northeast) of INTEC. Mercury surface-to-air flux measurements were made in October 2002 and from February through May 2003 to better understand the fate of the estimated 1500 kg of mercury emitted from 36 years of calciner operations at INTEC and to improve our scientific understanding of mercury environmental cycling in this region. Flux was measured using an INEEL-designed dynamic flux chamber system with a Tekran automated dual sampling (TADS) unit. Diel flux was positively correlated with solar radiation (r = 0.65), air temperature (r = 0.64), and wind speed (r = 0.38), and a general linear model for flux prediction at the INEEL was developed. Reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) was measured at EFS in July using a Tekran Model 1130 mercury speciation unit. Based on comparisons with other published data around the U.S., mercury air concentrations and surface flux rates directly downwind from INTEC were not distinguishable from remote area (non-industrial) background levels during the monitoring period.
Date: October 1, 2003
Creator: Abbott, Michael L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiological Dose Calculations for Fusion Facilities

Description: This report summarizes the results and rationale for radiological dose calculations for the maximally exposed individual during fusion accident conditions. Early doses per unit activity (Sieverts per TeraBecquerel) are given for 535 magnetic fusion isotopes of interest for several release scenarios. These data can be used for accident assessment calculations to determine if the accident consequences exceed Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Department of Energy evaluation guides. A generalized yearly dose estimate for routine releases, based on 1 Terabecquerel unit releases per radionuclide, has also been performed using averaged site parameters and assumed populations. These routine release data are useful for assessing designs against US Environmental Protection Agency yearly release limits.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Abbott, Michael L.; Cadwallader, Lee C. & Petti, David A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interated Intelligent Industrial Process Sensing and Control: Applied to and Demonstrated on Cupola Furnaces

Description: The final goal of this project was the development of a system that is capable of controlling an industrial process effectively through the integration of information obtained through intelligent sensor fusion and intelligent control technologies. The industry of interest in this project was the metal casting industry as represented by cupola iron-melting furnaces. However, the developed technology is of generic type and hence applicable to several other industries. The system was divided into the following four major interacting components: 1. An object oriented generic architecture to integrate the developed software and hardware components @. Generic algorithms for intelligent signal analysis and sensor and model fusion 3. Development of supervisory structure for integration of intelligent sensor fusion data into the controller 4. Hardware implementation of intelligent signal analysis and fusion algorithms
Date: February 12, 2003
Creator: Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Haggard, roger; Mahmoud, Wagdy; Moore, Kevin; Clark, Denis; Larsen, Eric et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department