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Fish Passage Through a Simulated Horizontal Bulb Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to"Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

Description: Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Both fish species were acclimated for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa; 1 atm) or 30 ft (191 kPa; 1.9 atm) of pressure in a hyperbaric chamber before exposure to a pressure scenario simulating passage through a horizontal bulb turbine. The simulation was as follows: gradual pressure increase to about 2 atm of pressure, followed by a sudden (0.4 second) decrease in pressure to either 0.7 or 0.95 atm, followed by gradual return to 1 atm (surface water pressure). Following the exposure, fish were held at surface …
Date: July 31, 2003
Creator: Abernethy, Cary S.; Amidan, Brett G. & Cada, G. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A brief examination of optical tagging technologies.

Description: Presented within this report are the results of a brief examination of optical tagging technologies funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was performed during the summer months of 2002 with total funding of $65k. The intent of the project was to briefly examine a broad range of approaches to optical tagging concentrating on the wavelength range between ultraviolet (UV) and the short wavelength infrared (SWIR, {lambda} < 2{micro}m). Tagging approaches considered include such things as simple combinations of reflective and absorptive materials closely spaced in wavelength to give a high contrast over a short range of wavelengths, rare-earth oxides in transparent binders to produce a narrow absorption line hyperspectral tag, and fluorescing materials such as phosphors, dies and chemically precipitated particles. One technical approach examined in slightly greater detail was the use of fluorescing nano particles of metals and semiconductor materials. The idea was to embed such nano particles in an oily film or transparent paint binder. When pumped with a SWIR laser such as that produced by laser diodes at {lambda}=1.54{micro}m, the particles would fluoresce at slightly longer wavelengths, thereby giving a unique signal. While it is believed that optical tags are important for military, intelligence and even law enforcement applications, as a business area, tags do not appear to represent a high on return investment. Other government agencies frequently shop for existing or mature tag technologies but rarely are interested enough to pay for development of an untried technical approach. It was hoped that through a relatively small investment of laboratory R&D funds, enough technologies could be identified that a potential customers requirements could be met with a minimum of additional development work. Only time will tell if this proves to be correct.
Date: July 1, 2003
Creator: Ackermann, Mark R.; Cahill, Paul A. (Aspecular Optics, Dayton, OH); Drummond, Timothy J. & Wilcoxon, Jess Patrick
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Trade and the Americas

Description: No Description Available.
Date: July 29, 2003
Creator: Ahearn, Raymond J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Scoping Inventory Calculations for the Rare Isotope Accelerator

Description: This document is a report on our activities in FY03 exploring nuclear safety and hazard analysis issues relevant to the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). It is not clear whether DOE will classify the RIA as an accelerator facility subject to the accelerator-specific safety requirements of DOE Order 420.2A or as a nonreactor nuclear facility subject to the requirements of 10 CFR 830. The final outcome of this issue will have significant impact on the construction and operation of the facility and the quality assurance requirements for items or services that may affect nuclear safety. The resolution of this issue will be an important earlier decision for the RIA project team and will require early consultation with the appropriate DOE authorities. For nuclear facilities, facility hazard classification depends on the inventory of releasable radionuclides; therefore, some simplistic, scoping inventory calculations for some assumed targets and beams are done to estimate the hazard category of RIA if it is declared a nuclear facility. These calculations show that for the scenarios analyzed, RIA would produce sufficient quantities of radionuclides to be classified as a Category 3 nuclear facility. Over the lifetime of RIA operations, it may be possible to build up Category 2 quantities of {sup 227}Ac and {sup 228}Th. A storage building, separate from the driver, target, and experimental buildings, used to store and isolate accumulated targets and other hardware, can mitigate the potential impact on RIA. The more onerous requirements of Category 2 facilities would only be imposed on the storage facility and not on the rest of the RIA facilities. Some of the differences in a category 2 and category 3 facility are discussed in Appendix 1.
Date: July 25, 2003
Creator: Ahle, L. E. & Boles, J. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Nonradiological Environmental Report Maamora Site, Morocco

Description: Under the Sister Laboratory Arrangement between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Moroccan National Center for Nuclear Energy Sciences and Techniques (CNESTEN), environmental sampling and analysis were performed to assess the background concentrations of nonradiological constituents in various environmental media at the Maamora Forest CNESTEN Laboratory Site. Samples were collected from surface soil, surface water and groundwater wells, short-lived vegetation (mainly native grass), and long-lived vegetation (cork oak). Samples were collected inside the property fence line, in the buffer zone surrounding the site, and off site at water locations. The soil and vegetation samples were analyzed for metals and pesticides and screened for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); the water samples were analyzed for metals, general minerals, and pesticides and screened for PCBs.
Date: July 17, 2003
Creator: Althouse, P E; Blake, R G; Bandong, B B; Belghit, H & Dehbi, N
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Congressional Record: Its Production, Distribution, and Accessibility

Description: Congressional Record.This report provides information about the Production, Distribution, and Accessibility of Congressional Record. The Congressional Record is the most widely published account of the debates and activities in congress.
Date: July 17, 2003
Creator: Amer, Mildred
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Congressional Record: Its Production, Distribution, and Accessibility

Description: The Congressional Record is the most widely recognized published account of the debates and activities in Congress. The Record often reflects the intent of Congress in enacting legislation. This fact sheet is one of a series on the legislative process.
Date: July 17, 2003
Creator: Amer, Mildred L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Guide to Individuals Seated on the Senate Dais

Description: This report is a brief summary of House and Senate procedures for reaching agreement on legislation. It discusses the provisions of House Rule XXII and Senate Rule XXVIII as well as other applicable rules, precedents, and practices. The report focuses on the most common and customary procedures.
Date: July 16, 2003
Creator: Amer, Mildred L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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House and Senate Chaplains

Description: No Description Available.
Date: July 18, 2003
Creator: Amer, Mildred L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A User's Guide to the Congressional Record

Description: The Congressional Record is a substantially verbatim account of remarks made during the proceedings of the House and Senate, subject only to technical, grammatical, and typographical corrections. It consists of four main sections: the proceedings of the House and Senate, the Extensions of Remarks, and the Daily Digest. This fact sheet is one of a series on the legislative process.
Date: July 17, 2003
Creator: Amer, Mildred L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Practical Physiological Monitoring Protocol for Heat Strain Control

Description: This protocol is indicated when employees are: (1) Exposed to Heat Stress above the TLV; (2) Performing low to moderate work rates with rare excursions to heavy rates; NOT for heavy and very heavy work rates or requiring peak outputs for extended periods; and, (3) Determined to need physiological heat strain monitoring by the cognizant Industrial Hygienist. The requirements are: (1) A work/rest regimen must be established at outset and adjusted as needed during operations (see Appendix A); (2) On-going data collection and review; (3) Rest times must be increased if indicated; (4) Intended for normal, healthy adults. Seasonal medical screening is recommended; and (5) Training for affected employees regarding this protocol, hydration, self-limitation, lifestyle effects and signs, symptoms and treatment of heat related illnesses. This protocol is to aid industrial hygienists in assessing individual physiological response to employee heat exposures, and provides guidance to identify and reduce heat strain as needed. Physiological monitoring is recommended when heat exposure exceeds the TLV by {ge} 2 C and/or when evaporative cooling is limited or eliminated. Typically, this occurs when the use of personal protective equipment includes impermeable or water vapor restrictive outer garments. This protocol is used to identify when heat strain may be excessive. This is determined through measurements taken during each rest period. If decision criteria are exceeded, changes in work practices shall be implemented immediately to reduce employee heat strain and prevent heat related illnesses up to and including heat stroke, a life threatening condition. This protocol may not be appropriate under all conditions. Sound Industrial Hygiene professional judgment is required. Because the measurements for this protocol occur during the rest phase of the work/rest regimen, the conditions affecting employee heat strain during the work phase must be carefully weighed. Work rate, effecting metabolic heat generation is the …
Date: July 1, 2003
Creator: Anderson, R. B.; Johnson, J. S.; Burastero, S. R. & Gilmore, O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Renewable Energy for Water Pumping Applications In Rural Villages; Period of Performance: April 1, 2001--September 1, 2001

Description: This report introduces conventional and renewable energy sources for water pumping applications in rural villages by reviewing the technologies and illustrating typical applications. As energy sources for water pumping, the report discusses diesel/gasoline/kerosene engines, grid power supplies, traditional windmills, electrical wind turbines, and PV.
Date: July 1, 2003
Creator: Argaw, N.; Foster, R. & Ellis, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Development of an EMAT in-Line Inspection System for Detection, Discrimination, and Grading of Stress Corrosion Cracking in Pipelines Progress Report

Description: This report describes progress, experiments, and results for a project to develop a pipeline inline inspection tool that uses electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) to detect and grade stress corrosion cracking (SCC). There is a brief introduction that gives background material about EMATs and relevant previous Tuboscope work toward a tool. This work left various choices about the modes and transducers for this project. The experimental section then describes the lab systems, improvements to these systems, and setups and techniques to narrow the choices. Improvements, which involved transducer matching networks, better magnetic biasing, and lower noise electronics, led to improved signal to noise (SNR) levels. The setups permitted transducer characterizations and interaction measurements in plates with man-made cracks, pipeline sections with SCC, and a full pipe with SCC. The latter were done with a moveable and compact EMAT setup, called a lab mouse, which is detailed. Next, the results section justifies the mode and transducer choices. These were for magnetostrictive EMATs and the use of EMAT launched modes: SH0 (at 2.1 MHz-mm) and SV1 (at 3.9 MHz-mm). This section then gives details of measurements on these modes. The measurements consisted of signal to noise ratio, insertion loss, magnetic biasing sensitivities crack reflection and transmission coefficients, beam width, standoff and tilt sensitivities. For most of the measurements the section presents analysis curves, such as reflection coefficient versus crack depth. Some notable results for the chosen modes are: that acceptable SNRs were generated in a pipe with magnetostrictive EMATs, that optimum bias for magnetostrictive transmitters and receivers is magnetic saturation, that crack reflection and transmission coefficients from crack interactions agree with 2 D simulations and seem workable for crack grading, and that the mouse has good waveform quality and so is ready for exhaustive measurement EMAT scans of SCC interactions. This section also …
Date: July 1, 2003
Creator: Aron, Jeff; Jon Gore, Roger Dalton; Eaton, Stuart; Bowles, Adrian; Thomas, Owen & Jarman, Tim
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Letter on intent to build an off-axis detector to study {nu}{sub mu}{yields}{nu}{sub e} oscillations with the NuMI neutrino beam. Version 6.0

Description: The question of neutrino masses is of fundamental importance. Neutrino oscillations seem to be the only tool available to us to unravel the pattern of neutrino masses and, perhaps, shed some light on the origin of masses in general. The NuMI neutrino beam line and the MINOS experiment represent a major investment of US High Energy Physics in the area of neutrino physics. the forthcoming results could decisively establish neutrino oscillations as the underlying physics mechanism for the atmospheric {nu}{sub {mu}} deficit and provide a precise measurement of the corresponding oscillation parameters, {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23}. This, however, is just a beginning of a long journey into uncharted territories. The key to these new territories is the detection of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations associated with the atmospheric {nu}{sub {mu}} deficit, controlled by the little known mixing angle sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}. A precise measurement of the amplitude of these oscillations will enable a determination of the pattern of the mass hierarchy of neutrinos. If the solar neutrino experiments determine that the value {Delta}m{sub 12}{sup 2} is in the range of 10{sup -5}-10{sup -4} eV{sup 2} then the measurement of the CP violation in the neutrino sector may well be within our reach. The full potential of the NuMI neutrino beam can be exploited by complementing the MINOS detector, under construction, with a new detector(s) placed at some off-axis position and collecting data in parallel with MINOS. The first phase of the proposed program includes a new detector, optimized for {nu}{sub e} detection, with a fiducial mass of the order os 20 kton and exposed to neutrino and antineutrino beams. In a five year run its sensitivity to the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations will be at least a factor of ten beyond the current …
Date: July 30, 2003
Creator: Ayres, D.; Goodman, M.; Guarino, V.; Joffe-Minnor, T.; Reyna, D.; Talaga, R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A strong hot spot theorem

Description: No Description Available.
Date: July 1, 2003
Creator: Bailey, David H. & Rudolph, Daniel J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Fiber Optical Micro-Detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants Progress Report

Description: Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12}, a cluster compound whose luminescence depends on the ambient concentration of oxygen, is the basis for a real-time oxygen sensor for combustion applications. Previously, the properties of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} have largely been studied at room temperature; these studies have now been extended to 200 C. Optical microscopy shows that Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} undergoes a steady change in color as it is heated from room temperature to 200 C, changing from canary yellow to crimson and then back to canary yellow. Concurrent thermal gravimetric analyses show a small weight loss for Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} that is consistent with loss of water or HCl from the clusters. These changes are reversible. Absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopy of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} heated to 200 C for two hours shows no change in the photophysical parameters compared to the control sample that was not heat cycled.
Date: July 1, 2003
Creator: Baker, Gregory L.; Ghosh, Ruby N. & III, D.J. Osborn
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Advanced Flue Gas Conditioning as a Retrofit Upgrade to Enhance Pm Collection From Coal-Fired Electric Utility Boilers, Quarterly Technical Report: April-June 2003

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. This quarterly report summarizes project activity for the period April-June, 2003. In this period there was limited activity and no active field trials. Results of ash analysis from the AEP Conesville demonstration were received. In addition, a site visit was made to We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant and a proposal extended for a flue gas conditioning trial with the ADA-51 cohesivity additive. It is expected that this will be the final full-scale evaluation on the project.
Date: July 30, 2003
Creator: Baldrey, Kenneth E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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