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Reconciliation Report

Description: Reconciliation report with an ending account balance of $454.75 reconciled for the period ending on July 14, 2001.
Date: July 14, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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[Reconciliation Report and Fastsigns Invoice]

Description: Reconciliation report with an ending account balance of $434.54 reconciled for the period ending on October 5, 2001. Also, an invoice from Fastsigns to Stonewall Democrats of $55.21 on September 5, 2001.
Date: October 5, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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[Deposit Summary and a Letter to Michael Milliken]

Description: Deposit summary of $45.00 made on May 9, 2001, and a letter to Michael Milliken from Daniel C. Graney, membership chair of the San Antonio Club regarding membership dues.
Date: May 9, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Deposit Summary

Description: There is a deposit summary from State members of $210.00 made on May 23, 2000. A deposit summary from the Dallas Stonewall Democratic Club of $695.00 made on May 23, 2000. Also, a deposit summary from Houston Stonewall Democratic Club of $385.00 made on June 9, 2000
Date: February 3, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Reconciliation Report

Description: Reconciliation report with an ending account balance of $425.00 reconciled for the period ending on March 30, 2001.
Date: April 9, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Reconciliation Report

Description: Reconciliation report with an ending account balance of $1,043.54 reconciled for the period ending on November 30, 2001.
Date: December 10, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Deposit Summary

Description: Deposit summary of $480.00 made on December 5, 2001.
Date: December 5, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Reconciliation Report

Description: Reconciliation report with an ending account balance of $425.00 reconciled for the period ending on May 9, 2001.
Date: May 9, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Second Board Meeting Notice

Description: Board of Directors meeting on October 16, 2001 with location information. On the back side is handwritten note listing organizations and names of several individuals.
Date: 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

[Reconciliation Report and Pamphlet]

Description: Reconciliation report with an ending account balance of $539.54 reconciled for the period ending on October 31, 2001. Also, a pamphlet from Dallas National Bank covering information about Select ATM.
Date: November 9, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Deposit Summary

Description: Deposit summary of $35.00 made on August 9, 2001.
Date: August 9, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Deposit Summary

Description: Deposit summary of $24.00 made on December 10, 2001.
Date: December 10, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Reconciliation Report

Description: Reconciliation report with an ending account balance of $454.75 reconciled for the period ending on July 14, 2001.
Date: July 14, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Texas Stonewall Democratic Caucus Custom Report

Description: Custom report with a net income of $355.00 for the period ending on March 16, 2001. There is a balance sheet of total liabilities and equity of $355.00. Included is a general ledger of all the financial transactions as of March 16, 2001. Also, there is an Officers and Board of Directors phone list.
Date: March 16, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Reconciliation Report

Description: Reconciliation report with an ending account balance of $434.54 reconciled for the period ending on September 11, 2001.
Date: September 11, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Deposit Summary

Description: Deposit summary of $105.00 made on November 7, 2001.
Date: November 7, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Deposit Summary

Description: Deposit summary of $10.00 made on March 21, 2001
Date: March 21, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Reconciliation Report

Description: Reconciliation report with an ending account balance of $454.75 reconciled for the period ending on July 31, 2001.
Date: August 8, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

Why are the P{sub n} and S{sub n} Methods Equivalent

Description: The author assumes that the reader is familiar with the Spherical harmonics, Pn, method and the discrete ordinates, S{sub n}, method; for a derivation of the equations used in these methods. I will only discuss the Boltzmann equation in one dimension, and the Sn method using Gaussian quadrature. I will do this merely to simplify the following discussion; once you understand the concepts presented here you can easily extend the conclusions to more general situations. Why are the spherical harmonics P{sub n} and discrete ordinate S{sub n} methods, or more correctly the P{sub n} and S{sub n+1} methods, equivalent, e.g., P{sub 3} is equivalent to S{sub 4}? When the S{sub n} method uses a Gaussian quadrature most textbooks will tell you that both methods are equivalent to assuming that the angular flux can be represented by a Legendre polynomial expansion of order n. Most textbooks are wrong [1]. We know that the S{sub n} method constrains the ''particles'' to travel in discrete directions; when Gaussian quadrature is used these discrete directions correspond to the zeros of the Legendre polynomial P{sub n+1}({mu}). What is not immediately obvious is that the P{sub n} method constrains the ''particles'' in exactly the same way. That is why the two methods are equivalent. The author discusses this in terms of physics and mathematics.
Date: September 19, 2001
Creator: Cullen, D E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Effects of pressure and saturation on seismic velocities and impedance measurements

Description: Two synthetic data sets were examined to study the possible methods for distinguishing the effects of changes in saturation, and changes in pore pressure, on seismic velocity and impedance measurements. The results show that the results obtained previously on the dependence of laboratory velocity data on changes in saturation carry over without change to the data in these data sets. The assumption in this case is that the only data available are the seismic velocities. This situation can arise in cross-well seismic tomography. Of more direct interest to this project is how these methods and results should change when the data are instead seismic impedance measurements. The main conclusions are that the most appropriate plotting methods for seismic impedance data in order to distinguish changes in saturation, changes in pressure, and saturation changes from pressure changes are ({rho}{mu}, {lambda}/{mu}) and ({mu}/{lambda}, {rho}{mu}{sup 2}/{lambda}). All of these plotting coordinates can be computed easily from the impedance data {rho}{nu}{sub p} and {rho}{nu}{sub s}, since {rho}{mu} = ({rho}{nu}{sub s}){sup 2}, and {rho}{lambda} = ({rho}{nu}{sub p}){sup 2} - 2({rho}{nu}{sub s}){sup 2}, while {lambda}/{mu} = {rho}{lambda}/{rho}{mu} and {rho}{mu}{sup 2}/{lambda} = ({rho}{mu}){sup 2}/{rho}{lambda}. These choices are not the only possibilities, but they seem to give the desired results in many situations. Some issues remain concerning the details at high porosities and small pore pressures, and these will need to be addressed in future work.
Date: January 18, 2001
Creator: Berryman, James G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

H2O Outgassing In and Its Effects on M9787 Silicone

Description: Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) was performed on M9787 silicone, Cab-O-Sil-M-7D (fumed) and Hi-Sil-233 (precipitated) silica particles that had been annealed to 460 K for 24 hours then exposed to different moisture levels. Our results suggest that moisture desorption and adsorption in M9787 can be approximated by the interaction of its silica contents (Cab-O-Sil-M-7D and Hi-Sil-233) with moisture. Our experimental data also reveal that, in general, as heat treated silica particles are exposed to moisture, chemisorbed states, then physisorbed states are gradually filled up in that order. However, there seems to have some rearrangement of bonds as moisture desorbs or absorbs on the surfaces of the silica particles. Nanoindentation was also performed on M9787 silicones that were simultaneously pumped down to a few hundred Pa of residual pressure at room temperature. Our data shows that the removal of physisorbed water in M9787 has none or reversible little effect on the mechanical properties of M9787.
Date: September 1, 2001
Creator: Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; McLean, W; Balazs, B; LeMay, J D & Balooch, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Accounting Data to Web Interface Using PERL

Description: This document will explain the process to create a web interface for the accounting information generated by the High Performance Storage Systems (HPSS) accounting report feature. The accounting report contains useful data but it is not easily accessed in a meaningful way. The accounting report is the only way to see summarized storage usage information. The first step is to take the accounting data, make it meaningful and store the modified data in persistent databases. The second step is to generate the various user interfaces, HTML pages, that will be used to access the data. The third step is to transfer all required files to the web server. The web pages pass parameters to Common Gateway Interface (CGI) scripts that generate dynamic web pages and graphs. The end result is a web page with specific information presented in text with or without graphs. The accounting report has a specific format that allows the use of regular expressions to verify if a line is storage data. Each storage data line is stored in a detailed database file with a name that includes the run date. The detailed database is used to create a summarized database file that also uses run date in its name. The summarized database is used to create the group.html web page that includes a list of all storage users. Scripts that query the database folder to build a list of available databases generate two additional web pages. A master script that is run monthly as part of a cron job, after the accounting report has completed, manages all of these individual scripts. All scripts are written in the PERL programming language. Whenever possible data manipulation scripts are written as filters. All scripts are written to be single source, which means they will function properly on both the …
Date: August 13, 2001
Creator: Hargeaves, C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Multi-Scale Thermohydrologic Model Sensitivity-Study Calculations in Support of the SSPA

Description: The purpose of this calculation report is to document the thermohydrologic (TH) model calculations performed for the Supplemental Science and Performance Analysis (SSPA), Volume 1, Section 5 and Volume 2 (BSC 2001d [DIRS 155950], BSC 2001e [DIRS 154659]). The calculations are documented here in accordance with AP-3.12Q REV0 ICN4 [DIRS 154418]. The Technical Working Plan (Twp) for this document is TWP-NGRM-MD-000015 Real. These TH calculations were primarily conducted using three model types: (1) the Multiscale Thermohydrologic (MSTH) model, (2) the line-averaged-heat-source, drift-scale thermohydrologic (LDTH) model, and (3) the discrete-heat-source, drift-scale thermal (DDT) model. These TH-model calculations were conducted to improve the implementation of the scientific conceptual model, quantify previously unquantified uncertainties, and evaluate how a lower-temperature operating mode (LTOM) would affect the in-drift TH environment. Simulations for the higher-temperature operating mode (HTOM), which is similar to the base case analyzed for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) (CRWMS M&O 2000j [DIRS 153246]), were also conducted for comparison with the LTOM. This Calculation Report describes (1) the improvements to the MSTH model that were implemented to reduce model uncertainty and to facilitate model validation, and (2) the sensitivity analyses conducted to better understand the influence of parameter and process uncertainty. The METHOD Section (Section 2) describes the improvements to the MSTH-model methodology and submodels. The ASSUMPTIONS Section (Section 3) lists the assumptions made (e.g., boundaries, material properties) for this methodology. The USE OF SOFTWARE Section (Section 4) lists the software, routines and macros used for the MSTH model and submodels supporting the SSPA. The CALCULATION Section (Section 5) lists the data used in the model and the manner in which the MSTH model is prepared and executed. And, lastly, the RESULTS Section (Section 6) lists the two calculations conducted for the SSPA (BSC 2001d [DIRS 155950], BSC …
Date: December 20, 2001
Creator: Glascoe, L G; Buscheck, T A; Loosmore, G A & Sun, Y
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Diagnostic Systems Approach to Watershed Management

Description: The water quality of discharge from the surface water system is ultimately dictated by land use and climate within the watershed. Water quality has vastly improved from point source reduction measures, yet, non-point source pollutants continue to rise. 30 to 40% of rivers still do not meet water quality standards for reasons that include impact from urban storm water runoff, agricultural and livestock runoff, and loss of wetlands. Regulating non-point source pollutants proves to be difficult since specific dischargers are difficult to identify. However, parameters such as dissolved organic carbon (DOC) limit the amounts of chlorination due to simultaneous disinfection by-product formation. The concept of watershed management has gained much ground over the years as a means to resolve non-point source problems. Under this management scheme stakeholders in a watershed collectively agree to the nature and extent of non-point sources, determine water quality causes using sound scientific approaches, and together develop and implement a corrective plan. However, the ''science'' of watershed management currently has several shortcomings according to a recent National Research Council report. The scientific component of watershed management depends on acquiring knowledge that links water quality sources with geographic regions. However, there is an observational gap in this knowledge. In particular, almost all the water quality data that exists at a utility are of high frequency collected at a single point over a long period of time. Water quality data for utility purposes are rarely collected over an entire watershed. The potential is high, however, for various utilities in a single watershed to share and integrate water quality data, but no regulatory incentives exist at this point. The only other available water quality data originate from special scientific studies. Unfortunately these data rarely have long-term records and are usually tailored to address unrelated research questions. The goal of …
Date: February 23, 2001
Creator: Davisson, M L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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