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Advanced Hot Gas Filter Development

Description: DuPont Lanxide Composites, Inc. undertook a sixty-month program, under DOE Contract DEAC21-94MC31214, in order to develop hot gas candle filters from a patented material technology know as PRD-66. The goal of this program was to extend the development of this material as a filter element and fully assess the capability of this technology to meet the needs of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power generation systems at commercial scale. The principal objective of Task 3 was to build on the initial PRD-66 filter development, optimize its structure, and evaluate basic material properties relevant to the hot gas filter application. Initially, this consisted of an evaluation of an advanced filament-wound core structure that had been designed to produce an effective bulk filter underneath the barrier filter formed by the outer membrane. The basic material properties to be evaluated (as established by the DOE/METC materials working group) would include mechanical, thermal, and fracture toughness parameters for both new and used material, for the purpose of building a material database consistent with what is being done for the alternative candle filter systems. Task 3 was later expanded to include analysis of PRD-66 candle filters, which had been exposed to actual PFBC conditions, development of an improved membrane, and installation of equipment necessary for the processing of a modified composition. Task 4 would address essential technical issues involving the scale-up of PRD-66 candle filter manufacturing from prototype production to commercial scale manufacturing. The focus would be on capacity (as it affects the ability to deliver commercial order quantities), process specification (as it affects yields, quality, and costs), and manufacturing systems (e.g. QA/QC, materials handling, parts flow, and cost data acquisition). Any filters fabricated during this task would be used for product qualification tests being conducted by Westinghouse at …
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Connolly, E. S. & Forsythe, G. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Alternative Fuels and Chemicals From Synthesis Gas Technical Progress Report: Number 24

Description: The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Tijrn, Peter J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Coal/Polymer Coprocessing With Efficient Use of Hydrogen

Description: The final project period was devoted to investigating the binary mixture pyrolysis of polypropylene and polystyrene. Their interactions were assessed in order to provide a baseline for experiments with multicomponent mixtures of polymers with coal. Pyrolysis of polypropylene, polystyrene and their binary mixture was investigated at temperatures of 350 C and 420 C with reaction times from 1 to 180 minutes. Two different loadings, 10 mg and 20 mg, were studied for neat polypropylene and polystyrene to assess the effect of total pressure on product yields and selectivities. For neat pyrolysis of polypropylene, total conversion was much higher at 420 C, and no significant effect of loading on the total conversion was observed. Four classes of products, alkanes, alkenes, dienes, and aromatic compounds, were observed, and their distribution was explained by a typical free radical mechanism. For neat polystyrene pyrolysis, conversion reached approximately 75% at 350 C, while at 420 C the conversion reached a maximum around 90% at 10 minutes and decreased at longer times because of condensation reactions. The selectivities to major products were slightly different for the two different loadings due to the effect of total reaction pressure on secondary reactions. For binary mixture pyrolysis, the overall conversion was higher than the average of the two neat cases. The conversion of polystyrene remained the same, but a significant enhancement in the polypropylene conversion was observed. This suggests that the less reactive polypropylene was initiated by polystyrene-derived radicals. These results are summarized in detail in an attached manuscript that is currently in preparation. The other results obtained during the lifetime of this grant are documented in the set of attached manuscripts.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Broadbelt, Linda J.; DeWitt, Matthew J. & Wong, Hsi-Wu
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Data Qualification Report: Precipitation Chloride Data for Use on the Yucca Mountain Project

Description: The data covered by this qualification report have been cited in analysis/model reports (AMRs) to support the Site Recommendation in determining the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a repository for high level nuclear waste. Those analyses cited both qualified and unqualified hydrochemical data. This report evaluates unqualified precipitation chloride data based on the pedigree of the data and within the context of supporting analyses on the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The following AMRs use the unqualified chloride data considered in this report: (1) AMR S0040, ''Geochemical and Isotopic Constraints on Groundwater Flow Directions, Mixing and Recharge at Yucca Mountain'' (ANL-NBS-HS-000021) (Kwicklis 2000)--an analysis of groundwater recharge rates, flow directions and velocities, and mixing proportions of water from different source areas based on groundwater geochemical and isotopic data. (2) AMR U0085, ''Analysis of Geochemical Data for the Unsaturated Zone'' (ANL-NBS-HS-000017) (Fabryka-Martin 2000)--identifies fluid geochemical parameters for the unsaturated zone, local precipitation, and surface water; discusses the occurrence and origins of fracture minerals; and presents a thermal history of the unsaturated zone. These data are being evaluated for inclusion in technical products to include AMRs and Process Modeling Reports (PMRs) that support the Site Recommendation and that may also be used to support the License Application. A finding that the precipitation chloride data are qualified means that the data are adequate for generalized use and can be appropriately used in a wide variety of applications, so long as consideration is given to limitations on the accuracy, precision and representativeness of the data for an intended use in a technical product.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Wilson, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Development of object-oriented tools for the numerical solution of reactive flow

Description: The primary work carried out under the subcontract involved the development of object-oriented application software, within the Overture framework of codes, for the numerical simulation of high speed reactive flow. The mathematical model on which the software is based is the reactive Euler equations. The implementation of this model is fairly general and allows for multiple reacting species and reaction rates and a general equation of state with the aim of being able to simulate experimentally observed phenomena in gas or solid explosives. The software is part of the OverBlown package of fluids codes, developed and maintained by Bill Henshaw and the Overture team at CASC. It uses overlapping grids in order to handle general domains and the A++/P++ array class library (developed by Dan Quinlan and the Overture team) which allows parallel processing. An implementation of a patch grid-type adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) scheme for the code was initiated, but not completed under the current subcontract. The software has been carefully tested for accuracy using existing codes written previously by the author, and it has been used to compute the evolution to detonation of reactive samples subject to various initial conditions and within various confinement geometries. Work on a number of smaller projects has also taken place. These include methods for conservative interpolation on general curvilinear grids, methods for characteristic interpolation, and developing software tools for numerical quadrature on overlapping grids.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Schwendeman, D W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Direct Push Groundwater Circulation Wells for Remediation of BTEX and Volatile Organics

Description: Direct push groundwater circulation wells (DP-GCW) are a promising technology for remediation of groundwater contaminated with dissolved hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. In these wells, groundwater is withdrawn from the formation at the bottom of the well, aerated and vapor stripped and injected back into the formation at or above the water table. Previous field studies have shown that: (a) GCWs can circulate significant volumes of groundwater; and (b) GCWs can effectively remove volatile compounds and add oxygen. In this work, we describe the development and field-testing of a system of DP-GCWs for remediation of volatile organics such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and toluene (BTEX). The GCWs were constructed with No. 20 slotted well screen (2.4 cm ID) and natural sand pack extending from 1.5 to 8.2 m below grade. Air is introduced {approximately}7.5 m below grade via 0.6 cm tubing. Approximately 15% of the vertical length of the air supply tubing is wrapped in tangled mesh polypropylene geonet drainage fabric to provide surface area for biological growth and precipitation of oxidized iron. These materials were selected to allow rapid installation of the GCWs using 3.8 cm direct push Geoprobe{reg_sign} rods, greatly reducing well installation costs. Laboratory testing of these sparged wells and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling showed that these wells, although they used only about 1 L/min of air, could circulate about 1 L/min of water through the surrounding aquifer. This flow was sufficient to capture all of a flowing contaminant if the wells are sufficiently closely together, about 1 meter on center depending on the air flow rate supplied, in a line across the plume. The CFD work showed the details of this ability to capture, and also showed that unforeseen heterogeneities in the aquifer such as a gradient of permeability or a thin impermeable layer (such as …
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Borden, R. C. & Cherry, R. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Electric Demand Reduction for the U.S. Navy Public Works Center San Diego, California

Description: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated the profitability of operating a Navy ship's generators (in San Diego) during high electricity price periods rather than the ships hooking up to the Base electrical system for power. Profitability is predicated on the trade-off between the operating and maintenance cost incurred by the Navy for operating the ship generators and the net profit associated with the sale of the electric power on the spot market. In addition, PNNL assessed the use of the ship's generators as a means to achieve predicted load curtailments, which can then be marketed to the California Independent System Operator.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Energy Efficiency Building Code for Commercial Buildings in Sri Lanka

Description: 1.1.1 To encourage energy efficient design or retrofit of commercial buildings so that they may be constructed, operated, and maintained in a manner that reduces the use of energy without constraining the building function, the comfort, health, or the productivity of the occupants and with appropriate regard for economic considerations. 1.1.2 To provide criterion and minimum standards for energy efficiency in the design or retrofit of commercial buildings and provide methods for determining compliance with them. 1.1.3 To encourage energy efficient designs that exceed these criterion and minimum standards.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Busch, John; Greenberg, Steve; Rubinstein, Francis; Denver, Andrea; Rawner, Esther; Franconi, Ellen et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma

Description: This Technical Quarterly Report is for the reporting period July 1, 2000 to September 30, 2000. The report provides details of the work done on the project entitled ''Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma''. The project is divided into nine separate tasks. Since this is the first Quarterly report, much of the work done is of a preliminary nature. Several of the tasks are being worked on simultaneously, while other tasks are dependent on earlier tasks being completed. The selection of the pilot test area has been completed. The drilling of the test well is waiting on rig availability. Phillips has begun sonic core testing of offset cores, waiting on the core from the well to be drilled. Design work is progressing for the tool, which will be built to fit the test well. Installation of monitoring equipment and the downhole vibration tool will occur after the well is drilled. Technical transfer efforts have begun with the submission of an abstract for a technical paper for the Oklahoma City Society of Petroleum Engineers meeting in March 2001.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Brett, J. Ford & Westermark, Robert V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy Modeling for Remote Chemical Detection

Description: Frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy techniques show promise for active infrared remote chemical sensing. FM spectroscopy techniques have reduced sensitivity to optical and electronic noise, and are relatively immune to the effects of various electronic and mechanical drifts. FM systems are responsive to sharp spectral features and can therefore reduce the effects of spectral clutter due to interfering chemicals in the plume or in the atmosphere. The relatively high modulation frequencies used for FM also reduces the effects of albedo (reflectance) and plume variations. Conventional differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems are performance limited by the noise induced by speckle. Analysis presented in this report shows that FM based sensors may reduce the effects of speckle by one to two orders of magnitude. This can result in reduced dwell times and faster area searches, as well as reducing various forms of spatial clutter. FM systems will require a laser system that is continuously tunable at relatively high frequencies (0.1 to 20 MHz). One promising candidate is the quantum-cascade (QC) laser [1, 2]. The QC laser is potentially capable of power levels on the order of 1 Watt and frequency tuning on the order of 3 - 6 GHz, which is the performance level required for FM spectroscopy based remote sensing. In this report we describe a high-level numerical model for an FM spectroscopy based remote sensing system, and application to two unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV) scenarios. A Predator scenario operating at a slant range of 6.5 km with a 10 cm diameter telescope, and a Global Hawk scenario operating at a range of 30 km with a 20 cm diameter telescope, has been assumed to allow estimation of the performance of potential FM systems.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Sheen, David M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Hydrologic Behavior of Two Engineered Barriers Following Extreme Wetting

Description: Many engineered barriers are expected to function for hundreds of years or longer. Over the course of time, it is likely that some barriers will experience infiltration to the point of breakthrough. This study compares the recovery from breakthrough of two storage- evapotranspiration type engineered barriers. Replicates of test plots comprising thick soil and capillary/biobarrier covers were wetted to breakthrough in 1997. Test plots were kept cleared of vegetation to maximize hydrologic stress during recovery. Following cessation of drainage resulting from the wetting irrigations, water storage levels in all plots were at elevated levels compared to pre-irrigation levels. As a result, infiltration of melting snow during the subsequent spring overloaded the storage capacity and produced drainage in all plots. Relatively rapid melting of accumulated snowfall produced the most significant infiltration events each year during the study. Capillary barriers yielded less total drainage than thick soil barriers. By limiting drainage, capillary barriers increased water storage in the upper portions of the test plots, which led to increased evaporation from the capillary barrier plots compared to thick soil plots. Increased evaporation in the capillary barrier plots allowed more water to infiltrate in the second season following the wetting tests without triggering drainage. All thick soil plots again yielded drainage in the second season. Within two years of intentionally induced breakthrough, evaporation alone (without transpiration) restored the capability of the capillary barrier covers to function as intended, although water storage in these covers remained at elevated levels.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Porro, I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Identification and temporal behavior of radical intermediates formed during the combustion and pyrolysis of gaseous fuels: Kinetic pathways to soot formation. Final performance report, July 1, 1997 - September 30, 2000

Description: A shock tube coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been employed to analyze the dynamic behavior of reactants, products, and intermediates in those reaction systems which are most pertinent to understanding the chemistry attendant to the soot formation process. The measurement of the decay rates of the reactants, the rate of formation of intermediates and products have been used to determine rate constants over a wide temperature range. Recent examples include the pyrolyses of allene, propyne, pyrazine, pyrimidine, pyridine, acetylene, furan, cyclopentadiene, and methylcyclopentadiene.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Kern, Ralph D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Low NOx Burner Development Program - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/30/2000

Description: This report describes the work performed to develop and demonstrate the VISTA combustor. The development effort was planned for three phases. Laboratory testing at a 1.5 and 6 MMBtu/hr scale was performed at thermo Power Corporation during the first phase. Also during the first phase, analytic modeling was performed to guide the design modifications evaluated in the experimental testing. Toward the end of the first phase, John Zink Company entered the program to participate in the design, evaluation, testing, and demonstration of a 30 MMBtu/hr combustor. The results of the second phase testing were to be used in the demonstration of the 30 MMBtu/hr combustor in a Koch Industries boiler. The program proceeded into the second phase. Two models of the VISTA combustor were tested. Measurements of the first stage NOx production were in the range anticipated to achieve the program goals, based on analytical modeling results. While testing the VISTA combustor at the John Zink facility, John Zink elected to discontinue the development of the VISTA combustor in favor of an alternative in-house concept. As a result, this program was terminated.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: McClaine, Andrew W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

Description: This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. During this time period substantial progress has been made in developing low temperature deposition techniques to produce dense, nanocrystalline yttrium-stabilized zirconia films on both dense oxide and polymer substrates. Microstructural changes in unsupported nanocrystalline yttrium stabilized zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}:16%Y, or YSZ) thin films were examined as a function of temperature and annealing time in order to determine the grain growth exponent and the mechanisms of pinhole formation. Grain growth and pinhole formation were measured using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), normal imaging mode transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS). Grain growth was found to vary with a time exponent of about one half before pinhole formation and about one third after. Pinhole formation in 70 nm thick films occurred at temperatures near 600 C, corresponding to a grain size of about 15 nm, or a grain size to film thickness ration of approximately 0.25. The deposition of films on porous substrates is hampered by the penetration of the polymer precursor solution into the substrate whose pores as > 0.2 {micro}m, therefore much attention has to be paid to the development of porous colloidal oxide films onto surfaces. Thus during this line period we have been studying these films. Optical properties have proven to be an excellent way to study the quality of these nanoporous films. The influence of porosity and densification on optical properties of films on sapphire substrates that were prepared from water colloidal suspensions of small ({approx}5nm) particles of ceria was investigated. The colloidal ceria films have initially very porous structure (porosity about 50%) and densification starts at about 600 C accompanied by grain growth. The concurrence …
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Anderson, Harlan U.; Huebner, Wayne & Kosacki, Igor
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Materials development and field demonstration of high-recycled-content concrete for energy-efficient building construction

Description: The project developed high-recycled-content concrete material with balanced structural and thermal attributes for use in energy-efficient building construction. Recycled plastics, tire, wool, steel and concrete were used as replacement for coarse aggregates in concrete and masonry production. With recycled materials the specific heat and thermal conductivity of concrete could be tailored to enhance the energy-efficiency of concrete buildings. A comprehensive field project was implemented which confirmed the benefits of high-recycled-content concrete for energy-efficient building construction.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Ostowari, Ken & Nosson, Ali
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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NAAG/DOE Workgroup Report of Activity and Accomplishments

Description: Through this grant, the National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) and the Department of Energy (DOE) have established a working group of Assistant Attorneys General and key DOE staff to seek agreement on current regulatory and statutory enforcement and compliance issues at DOE facilities. This workgroup provides an ongoing forum for direct communication that utilizes alternative dispute resolution techniques rather than expensive litigation in hopes of resolving differing views between the Department and the States. This Workgroup facilitates cooperation as the parties work towards their common goals of ensuring the protection of human health and the environment through the clean-up and the proper management of DOE facilities and the wastes they have generated.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Gagnon, Michele
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Noble Metals and Spinel Settling in High Level Waste Glass Melters

Description: In the continuing effort to support the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the noble metals issue is addressed. There is an additional concern about the amount of noble metals expected to be present in the future batches that will be considered for vitrification in the DWPF. Several laboratory, as well as melter-scale, studies have been completed by various organizations (mainly PNNL, SRTC, and WVDP in the USA). This letter report statuses the noble metals issue and focuses at the settling of noble metals in melters.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Sundaram, S Kamakshi & Perez Jr, Joseph M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Noble Metals and Spinel Settling in High Level Waste Glass Melters

Description: In the continuing effort to support the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the noble metals issue is addressed. There is an additional concern about the amount of noble metals expected to be present in the future batches that will be considered for vitrification in the DWPF. Several laboratory, as well as melter-scale, studies have been completed by various organizations (mainly PNNL, SRTC, and WVDP in the USA). This letter report statuses the noble metals issue and focuses at the settling of noble metals in melters.
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Sundaram, S. K. & Perez, Joseph M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Novel Mass Spectrometry Mutation Screening for Contaminant Impact Analysis

Description: Due to the limited budget of waste clean-up for all DOE contamination sites, it is critical to have a sound risk analysis with strong scientific basis to set priority for waste clean-up. In the past, the priority was often determined mostly by the type and quantity of pollutants and the observation of cancer rate increase. Since human cancers can be caused by various reasons in addition to environmental contamination, a rigorous study to find the relationship between specific contaminants and cancer is critically important for setting up the priority for waste clean-up. In addition, a contaminated site usually contain many different pollutants. However, it can be only a few specific pollutants are carcinogenic chemicals which are responsible for most cancers. Clean-up of small quantity of critical pollutants instead of the entire pollutant site can save significant decontamination cost. Since a few anti-tumor genes such as p53 and ras genes are highly conserved among various animals and mutation of these genes have been associated with many human cancers, it is very valuable to find the relationship between specific contaminant and specific cancer. Since it is not possible to pursue any human on the relationship of cancer and specific pollutant under well defined experimental conditions, it is desirable to pursue experiments on animals such as fish and mice to find out the relationship of mutation of p53 gene and specific contaminant. It is also required that the sequence of the region of p53 gene in animal is same as human being. Mutations due to pollutant can happen at various sites and only occur at a small percentage. In order to confirm the relationship between specific pollutant and mutation, a very large number of DNA samples need to be carefully analyzed. In the past, nearly all DNA analyses were pursued by gel electrophoresis. …
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: Chen, Winston Chung-Hsuan & Lee, Kai-Lin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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OPTIMIZATION OF THE CATHODE LONG-TERM STABILITY IN MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELLS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND MATHEMATICAL MODELING

Description: The dissolution of NiO cathodes during cell operation is a limiting factor to the successful commercialization of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). Microencapsulation of the NiO cathode has been adopted as a surface modification technique to increase the stability of NiO cathodes in the carbonate melt. The material used for surface modification should possess thermodynamic stability in the molten carbonate and also should be electro catalytically active for MCFC reactions. A simple first principles model was developed to understand the influence of exchange current density and conductivity of the electrode material on the polarization of MCFC cathodes. The model predictions suggest that cobalt can be used to improve the corrosion resistance of NiO cathode without affecting its performance. Cobalt was deposited on NiO cathode by electroless deposition. The morphology and thermal oxidation behavior of Co coated NiO was studied using scanning electron microscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis respectively. The electrochemical performance of cobalt encapsulated NiO cathodes were investigated with open circuit potential measurement and current-potential polarization studies. These results were compared to that of bare NiO. The electrochemical oxidation behavior of cobalt-coated electrodes is similar to that of the bare NiO cathode. Dissolution of nickel into the molten carbonate melt was less in case of cobalt encapsulated nickel cathodes. Co coated on the surface prevents the dissolution of Ni in the melt and thereby stabilizes the cathode. Finally, cobalt coated nickel shows similar polarization characteristics as nickel oxide. A similar surface modification technique has been used to improve the performance of the SS 304 current collectors used in MCFC cells. SS 304 was encapsulated with nanostructured layers of NiCo and NiMo by electroless deposition. The corrosion behavior of bare and surface modified SS 304 in molten carbonate under cathode gas atmosphere was investigated with cyclic voltammetry, open circuit potential studies, …
Date: September 30, 2000
Creator: White, Dr. Ralph E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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