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S-20 photocathode research activity. Part I

Description: The goal of this activity has been to develop and implement S-20 photocathode processing techniques at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in order to study the physical properties of the photocathode films. The present work is the initial phase of a planned activity in understanding cathode fabrication techniques and the optical/electrical characterization of these films.
Date: November 22, 1983
Creator: Gex, F.; Huen, T. & Kalibjian, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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20-TeV colliding-beam facilities

Description: In March, a workshop was held at Cornell University on the accelerator. The conclusion of this workshop was that a 20 TeV on 20 TeV proton-proton collider is technically feasable, that construction could begin after 2.5 to 4 years of research and development, and the cost would be 1.3 to 2 billion dollars. To put this machine into perspective one must consider the existing facilities listed in table I. There are about 23 high energy physics laboratories in the world that are being operated or constructed. Most of these labs have an effective energy of less than 100 GeV and study principally the known quarks and leptons. The only accelerator operating at an effective energy greater than 100 GeV is the CERN proton-antiproton system. As has been presented at this conference in other papers their success has been great in a very short time, the discovery of the vector bosons W and Z. The only machine approved that will have an effective energy greater than 1000 GeV is the Russian accelerator UNK. The effective energy of a 20 TeV on 20 TeV proton-proton collider would be about 15 TeV.
Date: September 15, 1983
Creator: Huson, F.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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30 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage stabilizing coil. Final report for construction

Description: This report covers Phase II, Fabrication and Delivery of the 30 MJ Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Stabilizing Coil. A history of the manufacturing and assembly phase of the magnet is presented. Major problems and solutions are summarized, and illustrations of the major operations are provided. The Quality Assurance program is described with a listing of all nonconformance reports. Design documentation is provided, including a Design Document Index, monthly progress reports, and a list of papers given on the project. Appendices to the report contain copies of released and revised design calculations, test reports, assembly procedure, and nonconformance reports and engineering dispositions.
Date: March 1, 1983
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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200 Sand Steamflood Demonstration Project. Sixth annual report, June 1981-June 1982

Description: This demonstration project was initiated in the 200 Sand Pool in the Midway-Sunset Field, California Sand Pool to demonstrate the operational, recovery, and economic aspects of steamflooding a typical heavy oil reservoir which had unfavorable response to cyclic stimulation. The scope of the project involves 5 phases: (1) pilot site monitoring and evaluation; (2) pilot area expansion; (3) site selection for expansion to full-scale project; (4) expansion to full-scale steamflood; and (5) production monitoring. After expansion and steam injection for one year, the wells are averaging 8 B/D oil and 29 B/D water per well. This rate is above the 5 BOPD for cyclic stimulation. Most of the producing wells are steam stimulated about twice a year to enhance steam breakthrough from the continuous steam. The total area has averaged 319 B/D oil and 1233 B/D water the last year. 7 figures, 1 table.
Date: August 1, 1983
Creator: Alford, W.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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300-Area accident analysis for Emergency Planning Zones

Description: The Department of Energy has requested SRL assistance in developing offsite Emergency Planning Zones (EPZs) for the Savannah River Plant, based on projected dose consequences of atmospheric releases of radioactivity from potential credible accidents in the SRP operating areas. This memorandum presents the assessment of the offsite doses via the plume exposure pathway from the 300-Area potential accidents. 8 refs., 3 tabs.
Date: June 27, 1983
Creator: Pillinger, W.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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500-watt commercialized concentrator system

Description: A passively cooled, single-axis tracking, polar-axis mounted photovoltaic concentrator system has been designed, fabricated, installed, and tested. System description, design considerations, system performance and a production cost estimate are detailed.
Date: February 1, 1983
Creator: Ronney, K. & Aerni, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The 1980-1982 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington

Description: Since 1978, the Division of Geology and Earth Resources of the Washington Department of Natural Resources has participated in the U.S. Department of Energy's (USDOE) State-Coupled Geothermal Resource Program. Federal and state funds have been used to investigate and evaluate the potential for geothermal resources, on both a reconnaissance and area-specific level. Preliminary results and progress reports for the period up through mid-1980 have already been released as a Division Open File Report (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981). Preliminary results and progress summaries of work carried out from mid-1980 through the end of 1982 are presented in this report. Only one other summary report dealing with geothermal resource investigations in the state has been published. An Information Circular released by the Division (Schuster and others, 1978) compiled the geology, geochemistry, and heat flow drilling results from a project in the Indian Heaven area in the south Cascades. The previous progress report for the geothermal program (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981) included information on temperature gradients measured throughout the state, heat flow drilling in the southern Cascades, gravity surveys for the southern Cascades, thermal and mineral spring investigations, geologic mapping for the White Pass-Tumac Mountain area, and area specific studies for the Camas area of Clark County and Mount St. Helens. This work, along with some additional studies, led to the compilation of the Geothermal Resources of Washington map (Korosec, Kaler, and others, 1981). The map is principally a nontechnical presentation based on all available geothermal information, presented as data points, tables, and text on a map with a scale of 1:500,000.
Date: August 1, 1983
Creator: Korosec, Michael A.; Phillips, William M. & Schuster, J.Eric
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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1982 annual report: Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program

Description: This report provides a brief overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program's activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1982. The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate scientific data and fundamental biomass converison process information that, in the long term, could lead to establishment of cost effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels and petrochemical substitutes. The goal of the program is to improve the data base for biomass conversion by investigating the fundamental aspects of conversion technologies and exploring those parameters which are critical to these conversion processes. To achieve this objective and goal, the Thermochemical Conversion Program is sponsoring high-risk, long-term research with high payoff potential which industry is not currently sponsoring, nor is likely to support. Thermochemical conversion processes employ elevated temperatures to convert biomass materials into energy. Process examples include: combustion to produce heat, steam, electricity, direct mechanical power; gasification to produce fuel gas or synthesis gases for the production of methanol and hydrocarbon fuels; direct liquefaction to produce heavy oils or distillates; and pyrolysis to produce a mixture of oils, fuel gases, and char. A bibliography of publications for 1982 is included.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Schiefelbein, G. F.; Stevens, D. J. & Gerber, M. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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1982 environmental monitoring report

Description: The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1982 are summarized in this report. As an aid in the interpretation of the data, the amounts of radioactivity and other pollutants released in airborne and liquid effluents from Laboratory facilities to the environment are also indicated. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratory; and concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory. 30 references, 9 figures, 18 tables.
Date: April 1, 1983
Creator: Day, L.E. & Naidu, J.R. (eds.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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1982 Environmental Monitoring Report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

Description: Because radionuclides are potentially released from its research activities, SNL has a continuing environmental monitoring program which analyzes for cesium-137, tritium, uranium, alpha emitter, and beta emitters in water, soil, air, and vegetation. Measured radiation levels in public areas were consistent with local background in 1982. The Albuquerque population received an estimated 0.170 person-rem from airborne radioactive releases, whereas it received greater than 50,400 person-rem from naturally occurring radionuclides.
Date: April 1, 1983
Creator: Millard, Gloria Chavez; Gray, Charles E.; Simmons, Theodore N. & O'Neal, Bill L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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1982 laser program annual report

Description: This annual report covers the following eight sections: (1) laser program review, (2) laser systems and operation, (3) target design, (4) target fabrication, (5) fusion experiments program, (6) Zeus laser project, (7) laser research and development, and (8) energy applications. (MOW)
Date: August 1, 1983
Creator: Hendricks, C.D. & Grow, G.R. (eds.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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1983 Temperature Gradient and Heat Flow Drilling Project for the State of Washington

Description: During the Summer of 1983, a three-hole drilling program was carried out to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The general locations of the project areas are shown. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens - Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.
Date: November 1983
Creator: Korosec, M. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The 1983 Temperature Gradient and Heat Flow Drilling Project for the State of Washington

Description: During the Summer of 1983, the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources carried out a three-hole drilling program to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The project was part of the state-coupled US Department of Energy Geothermal Program. Richardson Well Drilling of Tacoma, Washington was subcontracted through the State to perform the work. The general locations of the project areas are shown in figure 1. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens--Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.
Date: November 1, 1983
Creator: Korosec, Michael A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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5f state interaction with inner coordination sphere ligands: einsteinium 3+ ion fluorescence in aqueous and organic phases

Description: The interaction between 5f electron states of einsteinium 3+ ion and coordinated ligands in solution has been probed using laser-induced fluorescence. Aquo einsteinium 3+ ion was observed to fluoresce from its first excited J = 5 state in a broad-band peaking at 9260 wavenumbers. The observed fluorescence lifetimes were 1.05 microseconds and 2.78 microseconds in H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O (99+ % D atom), respectively. The non-radiative decay rates derived from the lifetime data are compared with previously reported data for Cm, Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy aquo 3+ ions. The 5f actinide states exhibit substantially greater non-radiative decay rates than do lanthanide 4f states of similar energy gap. This provides evidence that actinide 5f electrons interact more strongly with their inner coordination sphere than do lanthanide ion 4f electrons. The fluorescence lifetime of einsteinium 3+ ion complexed with 1 formal di(2-ethylhexyl)orthophosphoric acid in h-heptane was 2.34 microseconds. 3 figures, 1 table.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Beitz, J.V.; Wester, D.W. & Williams, C.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Accelerating heavy ions in Fermilab

Description: Recently several laboratories initiated discussions on the design and construction of high energy heavy-ion colliders to study the formation and the characteristics of quark/gluon plasma. The beam energies considered are > 30 GeV/nucleon and the costs of the machines considered are all in the hundreds of megabuck class. We consider here a poor-man's scheme of entering into a first phase of such studies.
Date: November 1, 1983
Creator: Teng, L.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Accelerator and Fusion Research Division annual report, October 1981-September 1982. Fiscal year 1982

Description: This report covers the activities of LBL's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division (AFRD) during 1982. In nuclear physics, the Uranium Beams Improvement Project was concluded early in the year, and experimentation to exploit the new capabilities began in earnest. Technical improvement of the Bevalac during the year centered on a heavy-ion radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) as part of the local injector upgrade, and we collaborated in studies of high-energy heavy-ion collision facilities. The Division continued its collaboration with Fermilab to design a beam-cooling system for the Tevatron I proton-antiprotron collider and to engineer the needed cooling components for the antiproton. The high-field magnet program set yet another record for field strength in an accelerator-type dipole magnet (9.2 T at 1.8 K). The Division developed the design for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a 1.3-GeV electron storage ring designed explicitly (with low beam emittance and 12 long straight sections) to generate high-brilliance synchrotron light from insertion devices. The Division's Magnetic Fusion Energy group continued to support major experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and General Atomic Co. by developing positive-ion-based neutral-beam injectors. Progress was made toward converting our major source-test facility into a long-pulse national facility, the Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility, which was completed on schedule and within budget in 1983. Heavy Ion Fusion research focused on planning, theoretical studies, and beam-transport experiments leading toward a High Temperature Experiment - a major test of this promising backup approach to fusion energy.
Date: May 1, 1983
Creator: Johnson, R.K. & Bouret, C. (eds.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Accelerator Division satellite refrigerator compressor system and gas purification procedures

Description: Following construction and prior to commissioning a compressor system, it is necessary to test the piping, fill the purification vessels with adsorbents and remove all contaminants. The technical papers incoprorated in this report give detailed procedures for those tasks. (GHT)
Date: September 8, 1983
Creator: Pallaver, C.B. & Satti, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Accident at Three Mile Island and its aftermath

Description: Viewgraphs are presented that describe the Three Mile Island-2 reactor; the severe accident in the reactor; activity levels following the accident; and estimated costs associated with the accident.
Date: April 18, 1983
Creator: Malinauskas, A.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Acord 1-26 hot, dry well, Roosevelt Hot Springs hot dry rock prospect, Utah

Description: The Acord 1-26 well is a hot, dry well peripheral to the Roosevelt Hot Springs known geothermal resource area (KGRA) in southwestern Utah. The bottom-hole temperature in this 3854-m-deep well is 230/sup 0/C, and the thermal gradient is 54/sup 0/C/km. The basal 685 m, comprised of biotite monzonite and quartz schist and gneiss, is a likely hot, dry rock (HDR) prospect. The hole was drilled in a structural low within the Milford Valley graben and is separated from the Roosevelt KGRA to the east by the Opal Mound Fault and other basin faults. An interpretation of seismic data approximates the subsurface structure around the well using the lithology in the Acord 1-26 well. The hole was drilled with a minimum of difficulty, and casing was set to 2411 m. From drilling and geophysical logs, it is deduced that the subsurface blocks of crystalline rock in the vicinity of the Acord 1-26 well are tight, dry, shallow, impermeable, and very hot. A hydraulic fracture test of the crystalline rocks below 3170 m is recommended. Various downhole tools and techniques could be tested in promising HDR regimes within the Acord 1-26 well.
Date: August 1, 1983
Creator: Shannon, S.S. Jr.; Pettitt, R.; Rowley, J.; Goff, F.; Mathews, M. & Jacobson, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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