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Use of Sulphite Cellulose Extract as a Tanning Material

Description: Report issued by the Bureau of Standards over chemicals used for tanning leather hides. As stated in the introduction: "an investigation was conducted to determine the suitability of sulfite cellulose extracts, derived from the waste liquors discharged from paper pulp mills, for use in tanning hides for the manufacture of leather" (p. 309). This report includes tables, and photographs.
Date: November 1, 1926
Creator: Wallace, E. L. & Bowker, Roy Clement
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Correlation of actual river water analyses with CMX raw water analyses

Description: Data acquired from the sampling of Columbia River water January 11, 1944, is presented. The water was analyzed for temperature, dissolved oxygen, and iron. The results were compared with results from samples attained from selected taps in the C.M.X. building.
Date: November 1, 1944
Creator: Kidder, C. P. & Frank, R. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Characteristics of a Sealed Internally Balanced Aileron from Tests of a 1/4-Scale Partial-Span Model of the Republic XF-12 Airplane in the Langley 19-Foot Pressure Tunnel

Description: This paper presents the results of the aileron investigation and includes rolling-moment, yawing-moment, and aileron hinge-moment coefficients and pressure coefficients across the aileron-balance seal through a range of angle of attack, tab deflection, and aileron deflection with flaps neutral and deflected 20 degrees and 55 degrees. Some of the effects of wing roughness and balance seal leakage on the aileron and tab characteristics are also presented.
Date: November 1, 1946
Creator: Graham, Robert R.; Martina, Albert P. & Salmi, Reino J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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An Estimation of the Flying Qualities of the Kaiser Fleetwing All-Wing Airplane from Tests of a 1/7-Scale Model, TED No. NACA 2340

Description: "An investigation of a 1/7-scale powered model of the Kaiser Fleetwing all-wing airplane was made in the Langley full-scale tunnel to provide data for an estimation of the flying qualities of the airplane. The analysis of the stability and control characteristics of the airplane has been made as closely as possible in accordance with the requirements of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Navy Department's specifications, and a summary of the more significant conclusions is presented as follows. With the normal center of gravity located at 20 percent of the mean aerodynamic chord, the airplane will have adequate static longitudinal stability, elevator fixed, for all flight conditions except for low-power operation at low speeds where the stability will be about neutral" (p. 1).
Date: November 1, 1946
Creator: Brewer, Gerald W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A Non-Gravimetric Method for the Determination of Uranium on Platinum Discs

Description: From abstract: "This paper discusses a method for the determination of uranium on platinum discs which does not involve direct weighing of the deposited film. A statistical analysis of the results obtained indicates that the procedure is more consistent than that based on a gravimetric method and offers a relatively quick and convenient means for obtaining uranium assay results where an accuracy of approximately 99% is desired."
Date: November 1, 1946
Creator: Lilly, R. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Diffraction Effects in Neutron Attenuation Measurements

Description: All errors due to diffraction effects in a neutron attenuation experiment are computed. Also a special experiment to measure the forward intensity of diffracted neutrons from lead and copper is described, and the results given. These agree with the theoretical values.
Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: McMillan, E. M. & Sewell, D. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Diffraction Effects in Neutron Attenuation Measurements

Description: All errors due to diffraction effects in a neutron attenuation experiment are computed. Also a special experiment to measure the forward intensity of diffracted neutrons from lead and copper is described, and the results given. These agree with the theoretical values.
Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: Sewell, D. C. & McMillan, E. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Excitation Function of the Reaction C12(n,2n)C11 at High Energies

Description: The excitation curve for the reaction C{sup 12}(n,2n)C{sup 11} has been calculated for energies up to 100 Mev. The calculations were done as described in the preceding letter for the similar reaction of C{sup 12} under proton bombardment. The results of the calculations for 50% charge exchange are shown in Figure 1. The calculated cross section for the reaction at 90 Mev is: .011 barns for 100% charge exchange and .013 barns for 50% charge exchange. The experimental value is 0.025 {+-} .004 barns. The ratio of the cross section of the reaction C{sup 12}(pnpn)C{sup 11} to the cross section of the above reaction at 90 Mev is 5.8 for 100% charge exchange and 3.8 for 50% charge exchange. The experimental ratio is 2.7 at 90 Mev. This difference in cross sections between the two reactions is established by two factors. Firstly, there is the part played by charge exchange in the C{sup 12}(pnpn)C{sup 11} reaction which leads to excited N{sup 12} with the subsequent boiling off of a proton, while a similar exchange process cannot take place for the C{sup 12}(n2n)C{sup 11} reaction. Secondly, there is the difference between the contributions of the knock out process as a result of the difference in the n - p and the n - n cross sections, which favors the p + C{sup 12} knock out reaction. It will be noted that the parts of the reactions which go through excited C{sup 12}, while practically equal, are so small that they do not greatly affect either reaction. Although the results of these calculations do not agree too closely with the experimental results, the results are probably as good as are to be expected because of the crudity of the assumed model. The results do, though, seem to give a good qualitative picture …
Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: Heckrotte, Wolff & Wolff, Peter
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Excitation Function of the Reaction C12(p,pn)C11 at High Energies

Description: Chupp and McMillan have recently measured the excitation curve for the reaction C{sup 12}(pnpn)C{sup 11} at high energies. Using the model of the nucleus described by Serber, the excitation curve of the above reaction has been calculated for energies up to 100 Mev. The excitation of the nucleus is determined on the basis that the incident proton makes individual collisions with the nucleons, the transferred energy exciting the nucleus. n-p collisions are taken to be three times more probable than n-n or p-p collisions. Charge exchange is assumed. The calculations were made for both 50% and 100% charge exchange. The decay of the excited nucleus is treated by the usual evaporation mode.
Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: Heckrotte, W. & Wolff, Peter
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Phosphorus Turnover and Photosynthesis

Description: The participation of phosphorus in biological oxidation-reduction reactions of the type found in glycolysis ADP + PO{sub 4}H{sup -} + 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde + DPN{sup +} = 3-phosphoglycerate{sup -} + 2H{sup +} + DPNH + ATP has suggested theories in which similar reactions are proposed for photosynthesis. In these theories the reducing power of photosynthesis is utilized not only for reduction of carbon dioxide but also, by means of coupled oxidations, for the generation of high-energy phosphate bonds, or in the last reference directly for the generation of high-energy phosphate. Since in these theories acyl phosphate is formed from inorganic phosphate, they are amenable to proof without isolation of particular intermediates, by means of radioactive phosphorus. It would be expected that the rate of conversion of inorganic phosphate to organic phosphate would be greater in light than in the dark. They have investigated this possibility under a variety of conditions and are unable to substantiate the theories.
Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: Aronoff, Sam & Calvin, Melvin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Phosphorus Turnover and Photosynthesis

Description: The participation of phosphorus in biological oxidation-reduction reactions of the type found in glycolysis ADP {ne} PO{sub 4}H{sup -} + 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde + DPN{sup +} = 3-phosphoglycerate{sup -} + 2H{sup +} + DPHN + ATP has suggested theories in which similar reactions are proposed for photosynthesis. In these theories the reducing power of photosynthesis is utilized not only for reduction of carbon dioxide but also, by means of coupled oxidations, for the generation of high-energy phosphate bonds, or in the last reference directly for the generation of high-energy phosphate. Since in these theories acyl phosphate is formed from inorganic phosphate, they are amenable to proof without isolation of particular intermediates, by means of radioactive phosphorus. It would be expected that the rate of conversion of inorganic phosphate to organic phosphate would be greater in light than in the dark. They have investigated this possibility under a variety of conditions and are unable to substantiate the theories.
Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: Calvin, Melvin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Progress Report for 1947

Description: The year 1947 has witnessed the dawn of a new era of atomic science, a flowering of fundamental knowledge of the nature of matter which appears to be unsurpassed even by that period of the 1930's which led to the age of plutonium. A great new cyclotron, an atom-smasher ten times more powerful than the one which brought plutonium into the world, has carried mankind over a new horizon of sub-atomic space. It has brought scientists at last to grips with the infinitely small and rapid forces, until now beyond reach, which operate within the incredibly tiny distances of nuclear space. On the new energy frontier created by the giant machine, now laws govern nuclear reactions. methods are at hand, heretofore unavailable, which permit the measurement and determination of the nature of sub-atomic forces. Under ultra-high energy bombardment, the nucleus presents a different appearance from the nucleus of Bohr and Rutherford, the nucleus of atomic energy fission. The new exploration of the atom has been sponsored by the Atomic Energy Commission with the giant, new 4000-ton cyclotron in the Radiation Laboratory of the University of California. This is the thirdmajor machine built by the Director of the Laboratory and inventor of the cyclotron, Professor Ernest O. Lawrence. Whether the new knowledge will be of immediate practical consequence cannot now be predicted. Nor could Professor Lawrence predict, when in 1934 he established a new atomic energy range for that day with his first cyclotron, that the fundamental knowledge he pursued would be climaxed with the discovery of plutonium. What can be predicted is this: without the new basic knowledge, practical atomic developments of the future would be limited to the applicability of the fundamental information which made possible the initial release of atomic energy. In short, the nation's atomic potential has …
Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Quarterly Report August 1947 to November 1947, Biology Division

Description: The following document is a compilation of quarterly reports from August 1946 to November of 1947 from the Biology Division of the University of Chicago.
Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: Brues, Austin M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Summary of the Reseach Progress Meeting

Description: A 1,000 Mev synchrotron is under construction. The magnet will be a ring magnet containing about 900 tons of steel. The plates are of 1.2 inch steel with a 0.1 percent carbon content. A diagram of the cross section of this magnet is given in Figure 1. The design of the vacuum chmnber presents some difficulties since the space behind the gap is not large enough to permit easy access to the windings and to the vacuum space behind the gap. The field strength at the gap is 15,000 gauss with a 1 sec. rise time. A d.c. generator of 1,000 v and 10,000 amps and a flywheel will be used to energize the magnet and store the energy. Plans for the vacuum system are not complete, but probably a porcelain system will be used. This will reduce the gap quite considerably. It is planned to inject at 3,000 volts. The energy added to be about 200 ev per revolution. The frequency range is 250 kc/sec to 10 mc/sec; the power required is 10 Kw. A diagrammatic view of the electrical arrangement of the r.f. system is given.The variable inductance is a coil tipped at variable pitch into a pool of mercury. The energy is supplied by four 3J160E tubes. The frequency must be accurate to 0.1 percent at the time of injection and after that 1 percent is sufficient. This is to be accomplished by means of a peeking coil in the field. The injection period is 100 microseconds. It is planned to use a 0.5 Mev d.c. Philips set to supply the injection voltage.
Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: O'Brien, Inez
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Summary of the Research Progress Meeting

Description: This summary discusses the following topics: (1) Neutron Scattering. By R. Hildebrand. A series of measurements have been made of the angular distribution of neutrons scattered from small spheres of various materials placed in the neutron beam of the l84-inch cyclotron. The scattered neutrons were detected by copper covered carbon detectors placed in a symmetrical arrangement about the scatterer. The carbon detectors, which wore activated by the neutrons through the C{sup 12}(n, 2n)C{sup 11} reaction, were counted using an arrangement involving four counting tubes. The copper around the detectors served the purpose of stopping any protons. A carbon disk monitor was placed at the collimating channel in the cyclotron shield. This disk Was also counted by the same arrangement. (2) Electrical Resistance of the Blood. By R. Rosenthal. It has been found that animals exposed to total body irradiation developed in their blood an anti-coagulant called heparin. This substance, which can be produced synthetically, has the property of prolonging the clotting time of the blood. In an article which appeared in 'Science' some work was reported on the variation of the electrical resistance of the blood with the amount of heparin present, If some simple relationship could be found between the electrical resistance and the amount of heparin in the blood it might be possible to get a measure of the total radiation to which the animal had been subjected. In the work mentioned above the electrical resistance was found to vary with time for normal human blood and blood from people treated with heparin in the manner shown in Figure. 3. The clotting time was the same for both cases. (3) l84-inch Deflector. By J. Vale. In an effort to determine the shape of the deflected deuteron beam as it emerges from the 1/8 inch aluminum window in the …
Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: Wakerling, R.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Topical Report on Literature Survey of Treatments for Monazite Sands

Description: The following report covers the literature available in the Battelle library as well as the Atomic Energy Commission (New York, N.Y.) on the processing of monazite sands for thorium and rare earth contents.
Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: Willigman, M. & Slowter, E. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Calorimetry research progress report

Description: This document is a November 1948 Calorimetry Research Progress Report from the Mound Laboratory. Updates are given in the following areas: (1) development of micro and macrocalorimeters of the resistance-bridge type, (2) study and design of a rod calorimeter, (3) half-life of Postum, (4) evaluation of various calorimeter types, (5) applied mathematics, (6) materials, and (7) future efforts.
Date: November 1, 1948
Creator: Haring, M. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Physics progress report

Description: This document is the November 1948 Physics Division Progress Report from the Mound Laboratory. Items covered include: (1) measurement of the vapor pressure of Postum by effusion and the quartz-sickle gauge, (2) preparation of a Postum sample for x-ray emission spectroscopy studies, (3) possible errors in the vacuum balance, (4) construction of a gamma counter, and (5) preparation of a postum bromide sample.
Date: November 1, 1948
Creator: Haring, M. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Wing With Quarter-Chord Line Swept Back 45 Degrees, Aspect Ratio 6, Taper Ratio 0.6, and NACA 65A006 Airfoil Section

Description: Report discussing a wing-alone and wing-fuselage configuration with particular characteristics as part of a series of tests of wings using the transonic-bump test technique. Lift, drag, pitching moment, and root bending moment were obtained for the configurations. The effective downwash angles and dynamic-pressure characteristics in the tail region are also described.
Date: November 1, 1949
Creator: Goodson, Kenneth W. & Few, Albert G., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Effect of Tensor Range in Nuclear Two-Body Problems

Description: The interaction between neutron and proton in the triplet state has been investigated. The central and tensor potentials have been assumed to be of the ''meson'' type but of possibly different ranges. The variational-iterational method has been utilized to determine V{sub o}, the strength of the central potential, and {gamma}V{sub o}, the strength of the tensor potential. A wide variation in the values of both central and tensor ranges were included. Calculations of this type have proved difficult in the past principally because of the sensitivity of the results to the quadrupole moment Q of the deuteron for which accurate wave functions are necessary. It would be desirable to have a more accurate value of Q deduced from experiment. The percent D state in the deuteron and the effective triplet range have also been computed. The results are applied to the discussion of the magnetic moment of the deuteron, the photoelectric disintegration of the deuteron, and neutron-proton scattering. It is concluded that experimental information on neutron-proton interaction at their present accuracy does not determine the range of the tensor forces except within rather broad limits. A decrease in the uncertainty in the triplet range by an order of magnitude would be required. Finally it is concluded that charge independence of nuclear forces can be maintained with the meson well.
Date: November 1, 1949
Creator: Feshbach, H.; Schwinger, J. & Harr, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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