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The A.B.C. "Robin" (British): A Single-Seat Cabin Monoplane

Description: Report discussing the A.B.C. Motors Robin, a single-seat monoplane that was built for pilot comfort, speed, and fuel efficiency. Information about the structural design, dimensions, weight, performance, and rough blueprints is included.
Date: September 1929
Creator: A. B. C. Motors
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Space-charge compensation in high-intensity proton rings

Description: Recently, it was proposed to use negatively charged electron beams for compensation of beam-beam effects due to protons in the Tevatron collider. The authors show that a similar compensation is possible in space-charge dominated low energy proton beams. The idea has a potential of several-fold increase of the FNAL Booster beam brightness. Best results will be obtained using three electron lenses around the machine circumference, using co-moving electron beam with time structure and profile approximately matched to the proton beam. This technique, if feasible, will be more cost effective than the straightforward alternative of increasing the energy of the injection linac.
Date: September 21, 2000
Creator: A. Burov, G.W. Foster and V.D. Shiltsev
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Location Algorithms and Errors in Time-of-Arrival Systems

Description: This report describes least squares solution methods and linearized estimates of solution errors caused by data errors. These methods are applied to event locating systems which use time-of-arrival (TOA) data. Analyses are presented for algorithms that use the TOA data in a ''direct'' manner and for algorithms utilizing Time-of-arrival Squared (TSQ) methods. Location and error estimation results were applied to a ''typical'' satellite TOA detecting system. Using Monte Carlo methods, it was found that the linearized location error estimates were valid for random data errors with relatively large variances and relatively poor event/sensor geometries. In addition to least squares methods, which use an L{sub 2} norm, methods were described for L{sub 1} and L{sub {infinity}} norms. In general, these latter norms offered little improvement over least squares methods. Reduction of the location error variances can be effected by using information in addition to the TOA data themselves by adding judiciously chosen ''conditioning'' equation(s) to the least squares system. However, the added information can adversely affect the mean errors. Also, conditioned systems may offer location solutions where nonconditioned scenarios may not be solvable. Solution methods and linearized error estimates are given for ''conditioned'' systems. It was found that for significant data errors, the linearized estimates were also close to the Monte Carlo results.
Date: September 1, 2001
Creator: AARONSON, EUGENE A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Accident and Off Normal Response and Recovery from Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Processing Events

Description: In the process of removing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the K Basins through its subsequent packaging, drymg, transportation and storage steps, the SNF Project must be able to respond to all anticipated or foreseeable off-normal and accident events that may occur. Response procedures and recovery plans need to be in place, personnel training established and implemented to ensure the project will be capable of appropriate actions. To establish suitable project planning, these events must first be identified and analyzed for their expected impact to the project. This document assesses all off-normal and accident events for their potential cross-facility or Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) process reversal impact. Table 1 provides the methodology for establishing the event planning level and these events are provided in Table 2 along with the general response and recovery planning. Accidents and off-normal events of the SNF Project have been evaluated and are identified in the appropriate facility Safety Analysis Report (SAR) or in the transportation Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). Hazards and accidents are summarized from these safety analyses and listed in separate tables for each facility and the transportation system in Appendix A, along with identified off-normal events. The tables identify the general response time required to ensure a stable state after the event, governing response documents, and the events with potential cross-facility or SNF process reversal impacts. The event closure is predicated on stable state response time, impact to operations and the mitigated annual occurrence frequency of the event as developed in the hazard analysis process.
Date: September 19, 2000
Creator: ALDERMAN, C.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Corrosion of Uranium in Desert Soil, with Application to GCD Source Term M

Description: Uranium fragments from the Sandia Sled Track were studied as analogues for weapons components and depleted uranium buried at the Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) site in Nevada. The Sled Track uranium fragments originated as weapons mockups and counterweights impacted on concrete and soil barriers, and experienced heating and fragmentation similar to processes thought to affect the Nuclear Weapons Accident Residues (NWAR) at GCD. Furthermore, the Sandia uranium was buried in unsaturated desert soils for 10 to 40 years, and has undergone weathering processes expected to affect the GCD wastes. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microprobe analyses of the fragments show rapid alteration from metals to dominantly VI-valent oxy-hydroxides. Leaching studies of the samples give results consistent with published U-oxide dissolution rates, and suggest longer experimental periods (ca. 1 year) would be required to reach equilibrium solution concentrations. Thermochemical modeling with the EQ3/6 code indicates that the uranium concentrations in solutions saturated with becquerelite could increase as the pore waters evaporate, due to changes in carbonate equilibria and increased ionic strength.
Date: September 1, 1999
Creator: ANDERSON, HOWARD L.; BACA, JULIANNE; KRUMHANSL, JAMES L.; STOCKMAN, HARLAN W. & THOMPSON, MOLLIE E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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THERMAL TESTING MEASUREMENTS REPORT

Description: No Description Available.
Date: September 27, 2004
Creator: ASHLEY, D.A. & JONES, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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ICRF heating and current drive in TFTR supershot plasmas: Data analysis and interpretation of ICRF/edge interactions. Research Progress report

Description: The relevance of rf-sheath-plasma interactions to ICRF operation in TFTR has been studied. Screen-screen and screen-limiter rf sheaths have been identified and analyzed for the old and new Bay M geometries on TFIR, including sheath voltages driven by both feeders and the central antenna conductor. Calculations have been carried out to determine the effects of ICRF on edge transport (profile flattening by E {times} B convection), impurity influx ({delta}Z{sub eff}) and edge electron heating (FS glow phenomena) as a function of edge plasma parameters, rf power and antenna phasing. It was found that many of the experimentally observed ICRF-edge plasma interactions on TFIR are consistent with the predictions of rf sheath theory.
Date: September 22, 1993
Creator: Aamodt, R. E.; D`Ippolito, D. A. & Myra, J. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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[Studies of non-linear dynamics of dissipative systems]. [Final report, April 1, 1988--October 31, 1989]

Description: In the period of this grant I worked on three main areas: (1) Symmetries in inviscid flow equations in one, two, and three dimensions and related nonlinear stability theorems for these flows; (2) applications of Hamiltonian mechanics to the problems of shallow water equations and internal wave dynamics in oceanic flows; and, (3) analysis of signals from chaotic systems with an eye toward learning how to build models of chaotic systems in nature.
Date: September 10, 1990
Creator: Abarbanel, D. I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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(Studies of non-linear dynamics of dissipative systems)

Description: In the period of this grant I worked on three main areas: (1) Symmetries in inviscid flow equations in one, two, and three dimensions and related nonlinear stability theorems for these flows; (2) applications of Hamiltonian mechanics to the problems of shallow water equations and internal wave dynamics in oceanic flows; and, (3) analysis of signals from chaotic systems with an eye toward learning how to build models of chaotic systems in nature.
Date: September 10, 1990
Creator: Abarbanel, D.I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Study of electron-positron interactions

Description: For the past seven years, this group has been interested in the study of tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. The program has centered about the AMY experiment which examines the nature of the final state products in electron-positron collisions in the center of mass energy range near 60 GeV. Results of these measurements have shown a remarkable consistency with the predictions of the minimal model of 3 quark and lepton generations and single charged and neutral intermediate bosons. No new particles or excited states have been observed nor has any evidence for departures in cross sections or angular asymmetries from expectations been observed. These conclusions have been even more firmly established by the higher energy results from the LEP and SLC colliders at center of mass energies of about 90 GeV. Our focus is shifting to the neutrino as a probe to electroweak interactions. The relative merit of attempting to observe neutrinos from point sources versus observing neutrinos generally is not easy to predict. The improved ability to interpret is offset by the probably episodic nature of the emission and irreproducibility of the results. In this phase of development, it is best to be sensitive to both sources of neutrinos. As a second phase of our program at Virginia Tech, we are studying the feasibility of detecting cosmic ray neutrinos in a proposed experiment which we have called NOVA. the results of the test setup will be instrumental in developing an optimum design. A third program we are involved in is the MEGA experiment at Los Alamos, an experiment to place a limit on the rate of muon decay to electron plus photon which is forbidden by the Standard Model.
Date: September 15, 1990
Creator: Abashian, A.; Gotow, K. & Philonen, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation

Description: The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.
Date: September 28, 2007
Creator: Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick & Zacher, Alan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Sulfur removal in advanced two stage pressurized fluidized bed combustion. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

Description: The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates of reaction between hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents under operating conditions relevant to first stage (carbonizer) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors (PFBC). In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the first stage generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, removal of sulfur compounds takes place through the reaction between H{sub 2}S and calcium carbonate. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction between hydrogen sulfide and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents will be determined by conducting tests in pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and high-pressure/high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor (HPTR) units. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure, and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S partial pressures on the sulfidation reaction rate will be determined. During this quarter a series of sulfidation tests were conducted in the high-pressure/high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor (HPTR) units. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure, and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S partial pressures on the sulfidation reaction rate will be determined. During this quarter a series of sulfidation tests were conducted in the high-pressure high-temperature thermogravimetric analyzer (HPTGA unit) using limestone and dolomite. The results suggest that half-calcined dolomite is much more reactive than uncalcined limestone. Also, temperature in the range of 800 to 950 C did not significantly affect the sulfidation reaction rates for both limestone and dolomite.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Abbasian, J.; Chowdiah, P.; Hill, A. H. & Rue, D. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

Description: The objective of this investigation is to evaluate two novel copper-based sorbents, namely copper-chromium and copper-cerium, for their effectiveness in removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas in the temperature range of 650 to 850 C. Such high temperatures will be required for the new generation of gas turbines (inlet > 750 C) in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Results of fixed-bed reactor tests conducted in this quarter, indicate that, at 750 C, pre-reduction with H{sub 2} in the presence of H{sub 2}O does not effect the performance of either sorbent for H{sub 2}S removal. For the pre-reduced CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} sorbent, copper utilization before the first H{sub 2}S breakthrough is substantially higher in synthesis feed gas mixture than in feed gas containing 30 Vol% H{sub 2}, and slightly lower than in 10 vol% H{sub 2}. In sulfidation-regeneration testing of copper- and additive-rich sorbents, chromium-rich CuO-3Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} sorbent demonstrated very high H{sub 2}S removal efficiency and high copper conversion levels (comparable to that of the 1:1 molar composition sorbent). Similar results were obtained with the cerium-rich CuO-3CeO{sub 2} sorbent, but only for the first cycle. The H{sub 2}S removal performance of both copper-rich sorbents was inferior to that of the respective 1:1 molar compositions. CuO-CeO{sub 2} sorbent testing in a TGA indicates no appreciable decrease in the sulfidation rate over 5 1/2 cycles. However, weight changes during regeneration of the CuO-CeO{sub 2} suggest that some copper or cerium sulfates formed.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Abbasian, J.; Hill, A. H.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. & Li, Z.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Three-Dimensional Inviscid Flow About Supersonic Blunt Cones at Angle of Attack - III: Coupled Subsonic and Supersonic Programs for Inviscid Three-Dimensional Flow

Description: The three-dimensional ideal gas flow in the shock layer of a blunted supersonic cone at an angle of attack is calculated using two asymptotic solutions. The first solution calculates the steady state flow in the subsonic nose region by obtaining a time-dependent solution of the hyperbolic equations using numerical techniques. Internal, nonboundary points are calculated using a Lax-Wendroff numerical type technique. Boundary points, shock and body surface, are computed using a time-dependent method of characteristics. When a steady state solution is reached the flow properties on a surface of constant {theta}, (where the Mach number is everywhere > 1) are used for initial data for the afterbody solution. The afterbody solution, using polar coordinates (r, {theta}, {phi}) assumes at r{sub 0} an arbitrary set of initial conditions provided by the nose region solution and computes the downstream flow as a function of {theta}, {phi}, and r until an asymptotic state independent of r develops. The interior mesh points are again calculated using a Lax- Wendroff type technique and the boundary points by a method of characteristics. This report covers the coupling of the time-dependent and radius (r) dependent solutions. Instructions are given for the operation of the resulting Fortran code. The type of input data required is detailed and sample output is provided. Output data is given in two sets of coordinates. One is wind orientated; the other set is given in body orientated coordinates; The analytical transformation from one coordinate system to the other is given.
Date: September 1, 1968
Creator: Abbett, M. J. & Fort, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The drag of two streamline bodies as affected by protuberances and appendages

Description: This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests of two airship models conducted to determine the drag coefficients at zero pitch, and the effect of fins and cars and of flat and streamlined protuberances located at various positions along the hull. During the investigation the stern of one model was rounded off to produce a blunter shape. The extreme range of the Reynolds number based on the over-all length of the models was from 1,300,000 to 33,000,000. At large values of the Reynolds number the streamlined protuberance affected the drag very little, and the additional drag caused by the flat protuberance was less than the calculated drag by the protuberance alone. The fins and cars together increased the bare-hull drag about 20 per cent.
Date: September 26, 1932
Creator: Abbott, Ira H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Fuselage-drag tests in the variable-density wind tunnel: streamline bodies of revolution, fineness ratio of 5

Description: From Summary: "Results are presented of the drag tests of six bodies of revolution with systematically varying shapes and with a fineness ratio of 5. The forms were derived from source-sink distributions, and formulas are presented for the calculation of the pressure distribution of the forms. The tests were made in the N.A.C.A. variable-density tunnel over a range of values of Reynolds number from about 1,500,000 to 25,000,000. The results show that the bodies with the sharper noses and tails have the lowest drag coefficients, even when the drag coefficients are based on the two-thirds power of the volume. The data shows the most important single characteristic of the body form to be the tail angle, which must be fine to obtain low drag."
Date: September 1937
Creator: Abbott, Ira H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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AGR-2 Data Qualification Interim Report

Description: Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office program provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to manage and document VHTR data qualification, for storage of the data in a readily accessible electronic form, and to assist in the analysis and presentation of the data. This document gives the status of NDMAS processing and qualification of data associated with the initial reactor cycle (147A) of the second Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-2) experiment which began on June 21, 2010. Because it is early in the AGR-2 experiment, data from only two AGR-2 data streams are reported on: Fuel Fabrication and Fuel Irradiation data. As of August 1, 2010, approximately 311,000 irradiation data records have been stored in NDMAS, and qualification tests are in progress. Preliminary information indicates that TC 2 in Capsule 2 failed prior to start of the experiment, and NDMAS testing has thus far identified only two invalid data values from the METSO data collection system Data from the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS) are not currently processed until after reactor cycle shutdown and have not yet been received. A description of the ATR operating conditions data associated with the AGR-2 experiment (e.g., power levels) are summarized in the AGR-1 data qualification report (INL/EXT-09-16460). Since ATR data are collected under ATR program data quality requirements (i.e., outside the VHTR program), the NGNP program and NDMAS do not take additional actions to qualify these data other than NDMAS capture testing. Data qualification of graphite characterization data collected under the Graphite Technology Development Project is reported in a …
Date: September 1, 2010
Creator: Abbott, Michael L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Airborne Dust Cloud Measurements at the INL National Security Test Range

Description: On July 11, 2007, a surface, high-explosive test (<20,000 lb TNT-equivalent) was carried out at the National Security Test Range (NSTR) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. Aircraft-mounted rapid response (1-sec) particulate monitors were used to measure airborne PM-10 concentrations directly in the dust cloud and to develop a PM-10 emission factor that could be used for subsequent tests at the NSTR. The blast produced a mushroom-like dust cloud that rose approximately 2,500–3,000 ft above ground level, which quickly dissipated (within 5 miles of the source). In general, the cloud was smaller and less persistence than expected, or that might occur in other areas, likely due to the coarse sand and subsurface conditions that characterize the immediate NSTR area. Maximum short time-averaged (1-sec) PM-10 concentrations at the center of the cloud immediately after the event reached 421 µg m-3 but were rapidly reduced (by atmospheric dispersion and fallout) to near background levels (~10 µg m-3) after about 15 minutes. This occurred well within the INL Site boundary, about 8 km (5 miles) from the NSTR source. These findings demonstrate that maximum concentrations in ambient air beyond the INL Site boundary (closest is 11.2 km from NSTR) from these types of tests would be well within the 150 µg m-3 24-hour National Ambient Air Quality Standards for PM-10. Aircraft measurements and geostatistical techniques were used to successfully quantify the initial volume (1.64E+9 m3 or 1.64 km3) and mass (250 kg) of the PM-10 dust cloud, and a PM-10 emission factor (20 kg m-3 crater soil volume) was developed for this specific type of event at NSTR. The 250 kg of PM-10 mass estimated from this experiment is almost seven-times higher than the 36 kg estimated for the environmental assessment (DOE-ID 2007) using available Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1995) emission factors. …
Date: September 1, 2007
Creator: Abbott, Michael L.; Stanley, Norm; Radke, Larry & Smeltzer, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Environmental Sampling FY01 Annual Report - Understanding the Movement of Mercury in the Environmental Surrounding the INEEL

Description: Environmental fate and transport of the toxic air pollutant mercury (Hg) is currently a high-priority regional concern for the INEEL, and national and global concern for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). At the INEEL’s Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), significant quantities (est. 40 kg/year) of Hg may have been released over 37 years of Environmental Management’s (EM) High-Level Waste (HLW) treatment operations. The EPA is very concerned about the continued global buildup of Hg in the atmosphere and aquatic ecosystems, and has recently invested heavily in Hg research to better understand its complex environmental cycling.1,2 The Environmental Sampling work began in FY99 as a joint INEEL/U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) field research effort to (a) better understand the fate and potential impacts of Hg emissions from the INEEL’s HLW treatment operations (operational component) and (b) contribute at a national level to the scientific understanding of local, regional, and global Hg fate and transport (research component). The USGS contributed snow sampling support in the field (Water Resources Division, Salt Lake City) and laboratory analysis of all samples (Wisconsin District Mercury Research Laboratory).
Date: September 1, 2001
Creator: Abbott, Michael Lehman
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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