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Brayton-Cycle Heat Recovery System Characterization Program. Glass-furnace facility test plan

Description: The test plan for development of a system to recover waste heat and produce electricity and preheated combustion air from the exhaust gases of an industrial glass furnace is described. The approach is to use a subatmospheric turbocompressor in a Brayton-cycle system. The operational furnace test requirements, the operational furnace environment, and the facility design approach are discussed. (MCW)
Date: August 29, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Nuclear structure of tellurium 133 via beta decay and shell model calculations in the doubly magic tin 132 region. [J,. pi. , transition probabilities, neutron and proton separation, g factors]

Description: An experimental investigation of the level structure of /sup 133/Te was performed by spectroscopy of gamma-rays following the beta-decay of 2.7 min /sup 133/Sb. Multiscaled gamma-ray singles spectra and 2.5 x 10/sup 7/ gamma-gamma coincidence events were used in the assignment of 105 of the approximately 400 observed gamma-rays to /sup 133/Sb decay and in the construction of the /sup 133/Te level scheme with 29 excited levels. One hundred twenty-two gamma-rays were identified as originating in the decay of other isotopes of Sb or their daughter products. The remaining gamma-rays were associated with the decay of impurity atoms or have as yet not been identified. A new computer program based on the Lanczos tridiagonalization algorithm using an uncoupled m-scheme basis and vector manipulations was written. It was used to calculate energy levels, parities, spins, model wavefunctions, neutron and proton separation energies, and some electromagnetic transition probabilities for the following nuclei in the /sup 132/Sn region: /sup 128/Sn, /sup 129/Sn, /sup 130/Sn, /sup 131/Sn, /sup 130/Sb, /sup 131/Sb, /sup 132/Sb, /sup 133/Sb, /sup 132/Te, /sup 133/Te, /sup 134/Te, /sup 134/I, /sup 135/I, /sup 135/Xe, and /sup 136/Xe. The results are compared with experiment and the agreement is generally good. For non-magic nuclei: the lg/sub 7/2/, 2d/sub 5/2/, 2d/sub 3/2/, 1h/sub 11/2/, and 3s/sub 1/2/ orbitals are available to valence protons and the 2d/sub 5/2/, 2d/sub 3/2/, 1h/sub 11/2/, and 3s/sub 1/2/ orbitals are available to valence neutron holes. The present CDC7600 computer code can accommodate 59 single particle states and vectors comprised of 30,000 Slater determinants. The effective interaction used was that of Petrovich, McManus, and Madsen, a modification of the Kallio-Kolltveit realistic force. Single particle energies, effective charges and effective g-factors were determined from experimental data for nuclei in the /sup 132/Sn region. 116 references.
Date: August 1, 1979
Creator: Lane, S.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Departmentwide audit of the visibility over the status of nuclear materials

Description: Over the last 45 years, DOE has acquired and produced significant quantities of nuclear material. Much of it is in warheads in the custody of the Department of Defense. The rest is at DOE laboratories, production activities, and assembly plants. Uranium, plutonium, and tritium constitute the bulk of DOE's nuclear materials inventory. Nuclear materials managers should know the status of material and how it is being used so that stocks can be acquired, maintained, and disposed of in a safe, economical and environmentally sound manner. DOE requires its field offices to assess the status of contractor-held inventories of the material annually and to report on its use and whether it is still needed to support DOE requirements. This audit was made to determine the accuracy of assessment reports on the status of nuclear materials at DOE's two major users -- weapons research and development (R D) laboratories and production and recovery activities. Specifically, our objective was to determine if the laboratories could support a requirement for materials they reported as in use or needed. At the production sites, our objectives was to determine if the reports properly identified inactive material and described its condition and plans for disposition.
Date: August 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Garden Carrier No. 2. Revision 1

Description: An analytical evaluation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Garden Carrier No. 2 was made to demonstrate its compliance with the regulations governing off-site radioactive material shipping packages. The evaluation encompassed five primary categories: structural integrity, thermal resistance, radiation shielding, nuclear criticality safety, and quality assurance. The results of the evaluation show that the cask complies with the applicable regulations.
Date: August 1, 1979
Creator: Box, W. D.; Klima, B. B.; Seagren, R. D.; Shappert, L. B.; Watson, C. D. & Aramayo, G. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Research program in elementary-particle theory, 1983. Progress report

Description: Progress is reviewed on the following topics: physics of ultra high energies and cosmology; phenomenology of particle physics; quantum field theory, supersymmetry and models of particles; and geometric formulations and algebraic models. Recent DOE reports resulting from the contract are listed. (WHK)
Date: August 1, 1983
Creator: Sudarshan, E C.G. & Ne'eman, Y
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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TOUGH User's Guide

Description: This document contains a technical description of the TOUGH computer program, which was developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for simulating the coupled transport of water, vapor, air and heat in porous and fractured media. The physical processes taken into account in TOUGH are discussed, and the governing equations actually solved by the simulator are stated in full detail. A brief overview is given of the mathematical and numerical methods, and the code architecture. The report provides detailed instructions for preparing input decks. Code applications are illustrated by means of six sample problems.
Date: August 1, 1987
Creator: Pruess, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Analysis and evaluation of processes and equipment in Tasks II and IV of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report, October 1977-January 1978

Description: Several experimental and projected Czochralski crystal growing process methods were studied and compared to available operations and cost-data of recent production Cz-pulling, in order to elucidate the role of the dominant cost contributing factors. From this analysis, it becomes apparent that substantial cost reductions can be realized from technical advancements which fall into four categories: an increase in furnace productivity; the reduction of crucible costs through use of the crucible for the equivalent of multiple state-of-the-art crystals; the combined effect of several smaller technical improvements; and a carry-over effect of the expected availability of semiconductor grade polysilicon at greatly reduced prices. Consequently, the specific add-on costs of the Cz-process can be expected to be reduced by about a factor of three by 1982, and about a factor of five by 1986. A format to guide in the accumulation of the data needed for thorough techno-economic analysis of solar cell production processes has been developed, called the University of Pennsylvania Process Characterization (UPPC) format, and has first been applied, as well as refined, in the Cz crystal pulling analysis. The accumulated Cz process data are presented in this format in the Appendix. The application of this UPPC format with the SAMICS cost and price determination methodology, at least in its Interim Price Estimating Guidelines (IPEG) form, has been established and is detailed.
Date: August 1, 1978
Creator: Goldman, H. & Wolf, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Chemical characterization of SRP waste tank sludges and supernates. [Various analysis methods for supernate, sludge, and salt lake]

Description: Most high-level liquid wastes at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) are byproducts from plutonium and enriched uranium recovery processes. The high-level liquid wastes generated by these separations processes are stored in large, underground, carbon-steel tanks. The liquid wastes consist of: supernate (an aqueous solution containing sodium, nitrate, nitrite, hydroxyl, and aluminate ions), sludge (a gelatinous material containing insoluble components of the waste, such as ferric and aluminum hydroxides, and mercuric and manganese oxides), and salt cake (crystals, such as sodium nitrate, formed by evaporation of water from supernate). Analyses of SRP wastes by laser-Raman spectrometry, atomic absorption spectrometry, spark-source mass spectrometry, neutron activation analysis, colorimetry, ion chromatography, and various other wet-chemical and radiochemical methods are discussed. These analyses are useful in studies of waste tank corrosion and of forms for long-term waste storage.
Date: August 1, 1979
Creator: Gray, L.W.; Donnan, M.Y. & Okamoto, B.Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Creep and tensile properties of alloy 800H-Hastelloy X weldments. [HTGR]

Description: Hastelloy X and alloy 800H were joined satisfactorily by the gas tungsten arc welding process with ERNiCr-3 filler and the shielded metal arc welding process with Inco Weld A filler. Test specimens were of two types: (1) made entirely of deposited Inco Weld A and (2) machined transverse across the weldments to include Hastelloy X, filler metal (ERNiCr-3 or Inco Weld A), and alloy 800H. They were aged 2000 and 10,000 h and subjected to short-term tensile and creep tests. Inco Weld A and ERNiCr-3 are both suitable filler metals and result in welds that are stronger than the alloy 800H base metal.
Date: August 1, 1983
Creator: McCoy, H. E. & King, J. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Analysis of Initial Flow Data from MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 Well

Description: Analysis of buildup data from the Initial Flow Test indicates that the MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 Well penetrates a zone of relatively high permeability (approx. 150 md); this high permeability zone, however, extends to a radius of only about 200 ft from the wellbore. The far field permeability (i.e., for r > 200 ft) appears to be rather low (approx. 11 md). No reservoir boundaries can be identified from the Initial Flow Test. Tthe reservoir simulator MUSHRM together with the formation parameters inferred from the buildup data were employed to history match the observed drawdown/buildup pressures and flow data. The calculated buildup pressures closely agree with the measured values; the rather poor agreement between the measured and calculated drawdown pressures is ascribed to the uncertainties in the flow rate data.
Date: August 1, 1981
Creator: Garg, S.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Two-Phase Flow in Geothermal Systems

Description: The overall object was to establish a full experimental correlation between flashing flows of water-steam in actual geothermal wells and flashing flows of refrigerant-114 (R-114) in the Brown University/DOE Two-Phase Flow Facility. Our experiments show that the similarity theory developed in our laboratory during previous phases of this research project can be used to predict accurately the pressure gradient in the two-phase region of a flowing geothermal well using laboratory measurements on R-114. This conclusion holds even when the actual geothermal well contains significant amounts of noncondensable gases. In this case, however, corrections must be introduced to account for the partial pressure of the gases.
Date: August 1, 1987
Creator: Maeder, P. F. & Kestin, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Albany 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, and Vermont: data report

Description: Stream sediment and stream water samples were collected from small streams at 1328 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 664 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water and surface water.
Date: August 1, 1979
Creator: Koller, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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MARS vessel safety analysis. LATA report No. 115

Description: A previous study was performed to assess the hazards associated with an accidental leakage of cooling water into the crucible of molten /sup 238/U for the MARS laser isotope separation experiment. Since that study found that the probability of such an explosion is extremely low during an accidental cooling system failure, a study was conducted to define a more realistic design basis accident (DBA) for the final MARS configuration. If the vapor-phase explosion is considered to be a significant threat, the design criteria for the vacuum vessel should be a working pressure of 67 psig or 101 psig momentary single pulse equivalent static pressure.
Date: August 1, 1979
Creator: Rigdon, L.D.; Donham, B.J. & Hughes, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Geohydrological studies for nuclear waste isolation at the Hanford Reservation. Volume II. Final report

Description: A field testing program to provide data for mathematical modeling of ground water flow in the deep basalts of the Pasco Basin was initiated in FY 1978. Tests performed in DC-2 and water level responses in neighboring DC-1 suggest possible leakage between the three lower piezometers in DC-1 and indicate a downward gradient in the upper basalt layers down to 4000 ft, beneath which there may be an upward gradient. A sharp steepening of the downward gradient near the Umtanum Unit suggest that Umtanum may be acting as a barrier to vertical flow. Pressure testing in well DC-8 in the basalts above the Vantage sandstone at 1700 to 2700 ft indicate a downward gradient. Water level elevations were higher and downward gradients steeper than in wells DC-1/DC-2. Well DC-6 was artesian, with a production rate of about 17 gpm, with 75% of this flow coming from the depth interval 3650 to 3800 ft. Pressure tests between 2200 and 4300 ft indicate artesian conditions in every zone. Water level elevations in the Grande Ronde basalts in DC-6 were higher than in the same zones in DC-1/DC-2. As in DC-1/DC-2, there appears to be a local heat minimum within 600 ft below the bottom of the Umtanum with higher heads at greater depth. The Gable Mountain anticline may be a flow barrier separating Cold Creek Valley from the Columbia River Valley to the north and east. Recharge to the deep basalts in Cold Creek Valley appears small, with drainage occurring to the southeast, parallel to the Cold Creek syncline. The lowest head elevation in DC-2 was 360 ft, which indicates that the deep flow systems in this area may be discharging to the Columbia River, probably at or below the Tri-Cities area. Presence of tritium in DC-2 at 20% of the Columbia …
Date: August 1, 1979
Creator: Apps, J.; Doe, T. & Doty, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor refueling

Description: This report contains three documents describing the progress made by the University of Illinois electromagnetic railgun program sponsored by the Office of Fusion Energy of the United States Department of Energy during the period from July 16, 1990 to August 16, 1991. The first document contains a brief summary of the tasks initiated, continued, or completed, the status of major tasks, and the research effort distribution, estimated and actual, during the period. The second document contains a description of the work performed on time resolved laser interferometric density measurement of the railgun plasma-arc armature. The third document is an account of research on the spectroscopic measurement of the electron density and temperature of the railgun plasma arc.
Date: August 1, 1991
Creator: Kim, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Stress studies in EFG. Fourth quarterly progress report, April 1, 1983-June 30, 1983

Description: Stress distributions have been calculated for a creep law predicting a higher rate of plastic deformation than modeled in earlier studies. The expected reduction in stresses is obtained, although quantitative results are not yet available because of difficulties in obtaining convergent solutions. Improved schemes for calculating growth system temperature distributions are being evaluated in a new subtask started at MIT. Other work in temperature field modeling has examined the possibility of using horizontal temperature gradients to influence stress distributions in ribbon. The defect structure of 10 cm wide ribbon grown in the cartridge system has been examined. A new feature is identified from an examination of cross-sectional micrographs. It consists of high density dislocation bands extending through the ribbon thickness. A four-point bending apparatus has been constructed for high temperature (greater than or equal to 1000/sup 0/C) study of the creep response of silicon, and will be used to generate defects for comparison with as-grown defects in ribbon. Another subtask has been started in collaboration with the University of Illinois which will examine the feasibility of laser interferometric techniques for sheet residual stress distribution measurement. The mathematical formalism for calculating residual stress from changes in surface topology caused by an applied stress in a rectangular specimen has been developed, and the system for laser interferometric measurement to obtain surface topology data has been successfully tested on CZ silicon. Testing and calibration of different fiber optics temperature sensor configurations are underway.
Date: August 15, 1983
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Abstracts: NRC waste management program reports

Description: This document consists of abstracts of all reports published by the NRC Waste Management Program at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Reports are arranged in numerical order, within each category.
Date: August 1, 1979
Creator: Heckman, R.A. & Minichino, C. (eds.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Minimum-B mirrors plus EBT principles

Description: Electrons are heated at the minimum-B location(s) created by the multiple field and the toroidal field. Resulting hot electrons can assist plasma confinement by (i) providing mirror, (ii) creating azimuthally symmetric toroidal confinement, or (iii) creating a modified bumpy torus.
Date: August 1, 1983
Creator: Yoshikawa, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Programmatic Support and Public Information Dissemination. Final Report, October 1, 1977--December 31, 1978

Description: Research projects in solar heating and cooling, photovoltaics, and industrial heating, and training programs in solar heating and cooling have been conducted in the CSU/SEAL program. Major accomplishments are: development of a solar heating and cooling system with evacuated tube collectors; determination that solar air heating and liquid heating systems of comparable collector quality have comparable seasonal performance and parasitic power requirements; development of photovoltaic cells of ITO/Silicon that have 10% efficiency; and installation of a commercial scale solar laundry drying facility.
Date: August 1, 1979
Creator: Karaki, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Interim report on the tandem mirror hybrid design study

Description: The initial phase of a 2-year design study of a tandem mirror fusion reactor is presented. The following chapters are included: (1) mechanical design of the plant; (2) plasma physics; (3) blanket design; (4) magnet design; (5) injector design; (6) direct convertor design; (7) balance of plant design; (8) fission burner reactor; (9) environment and safety; and (10) economic analysis. (MOW)
Date: August 1, 1979
Creator: Moir, R.W. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Interpretation of brine-permeability tests of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: First interim report

Description: Pressure-pulse tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Hydraulic conductivities ranging from about 10{sup {minus}14} to 10{sup {minus}11} m/s (permeabilities of about 10{sup {minus}21} to 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2}) have been interpreted from nine tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within eleven meters of the WIPP underground excavations. Tests of a pure halite layer showed no measurable permeability. Pore pressures in the stratigraphic intervals range from about 0.5 to 9.3 MPa. An anhydrite interbed (Marker Bed 139) appears to be one or more orders of magnitude more permeable than the surrounding halite. Hydraulic conductivities appear to increase, and pore pressures decrease, with increasing proximity to the excavations. These effects are particularly evident within two to three meters of the excavations. Two tests indicated the presence of apparent zero-flow boundaries about two to three meters from the boreholes. The other tests revealed no apparent boundaries within the radii of influence of the tests, which were calculated to range from about four to thirty-five meters from the test holes. The data are insufficient to determine if brine flow through evaporites results from Darcy-like flow driven by pressure gradients within naturally interconnected porosity or from shear deformation around excavations connecting previously isolated pores, thereby providing pathways for fluids at or near lithostatic pressure to be driven towards the low-pressure excavations. Future testing will be performed at greater distances from the excavations to evaluate hydraulic properties and processes beyond the range of excavation effects.
Date: August 1, 1991
Creator: Beauheim, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Saulnier, G.J. Jr. & Avis, J.D. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Application for approval for construction of the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area

Description: The following ''Application for Approval of Construction'' is being submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office, pursuant to 40 CFR 61.07, for three new sources of airborne radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS), the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF), and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA), will be located in one facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post-irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were canceled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies to be used in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building and stack and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, these systems will be dealt with separately to the extent possible. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex. 2 refs., 16 figs., 12 tabs.
Date: August 1, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Prediction of the behavior of structural materials under irradiation through modeling of the microstructure. Progress report, April 1, 1978-August 30, 1979

Description: The development of the radiation-induced microstructure occurs in several stages: formation of small defect clusters, formation of dislocation loops, nucleation and growth of voids, and regeneration of the dislocation network. With the exception of the latter, these processes can be modeled with rate equations of similar form. However, instead of using one rate equation for each defect cluster of a given size, the discrete formulation is transformed in a continuous one leading to Fokker-Planck equations. It is shown by comparing the steady-state nucleation rates of both formulations that the Fokker-Planck equation derived is the correct continuous description. A path-integral solution for the Fokker-Planck equation was derived to provide the basis for a numerical solution procedure, capable of dealing with the vastly different time scales involved in cluster formation, nucleation, and growth.
Date: August 1, 1979
Creator: Wolfer, W. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Convective heat exposure from large fires to the final filters of ventilation systems

Description: The Fire Science Group of the Hazards Control Department, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has been asked to design a probable fire scenario for a fuel-pellet fabrication facility. This model was used to estimate the potential for thermal damage to the final HEPA filters. These filters would not experience direct fire exposure because they are the last component of the ventilation system before the exhaust air pumps. However, they would be exposed to hot air and fire gases that are drawn into the ventilation system. Because fire is one of the few occurrences that can defeat the containment integrity of facilities where radioactive materials are stored and processed, the fire scenarios must be defined to ensure that containment systems are adequate to meet the threat of such events. Fire-growth calculations are based on the measured fuel load of materials within the fabrication enclosure and on semi-empirical fire-spread models. It is assumed that the fire never becomes ventilation controlled. The temperature rise of ceiling gases and heat transfer from ventilation ducting are calculated using accepted empirical relationships, and the analysis shows that even under the most severe exposure conditions, heat transfer from the duct reduces the fire gas temperatures to levels that would not hamper filter function.
Date: August 23, 1979
Creator: Alvares, N.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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