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Summary of Sons of the American Revolution Youth Contests

Description: Document containing a chart that summarizes several youth contests held by the Sons of the American Revolution Arlington Chapter.
Date: February 22, 2016
Creator: Texas Society Sons of the American Revolution, Arlington Chapter 7
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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Metallurgical Laboratory, Chemical Research - Radiation Chemistry, the Effect of Radiation on Water and Aqueous Solutions of Inorganic Substances

Description: Technical report summarizing our knowledge of the chemical effects of ionizing radiation upon water and upon aqueous solutions of inorganic compounds. The types of radiation considered are beta rays, gamma and X rays, and heavy particles, notably neutrons, deuterons, alpha rays and fission recoils.
Date: February 22, 1944
Creator: Allen, A. O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Appendix B-3. Statistical Summary of Hydrochemical Data from Ground and Surface Water Samples, Ekalaka, Montana/North Dakota/South Dakota Quadrangle

Description: Appendix containing a statistical summary of hyrogeochemical data from ground and surface water samples to accompany a report on U.S. uranium resources in the Ekalaka Quadrangle in Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota.
Date: February 22, 1980
Creator: Robinson, Keith & Adkisson, Cheryl W.
Location: None
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Sector 30 collimator radiation

Description: The collimators at Sector 30 of the SLAC accelerator are designed to scrape off a significant fraction (e.g., {approximately}20%) of the SLC beam. The electromagnetic cascade shower that develops in the collimator, and in the scraper and waveguide downbeam, leads to very high radiation exposures of TV cameras (and other devices) located nearby. The collimator (point) source accounts for one-third of the dose and is best shielded by extending the radius of the copper scraper. Radiation from the waveguide accounts for the remaining two-thirds of the dose, and is difficult to shield since it is a line source. However, the spectrum from the waveguide is expected to be softer than that from the collimator. This paper discusses shielding of these sources.
Date: February 22, 1990
Creator: Namito, Y. (Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)); Nelson, W. R. & Benson, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Program for calculating x-ray powder diffraction interplanar (d) spacings with a Tektronix-31 desk top programmable calculator

Description: A Tektronix-31 (Tektronix Inc. Beaverton, Oregon) desk top calculator program, which is used as a backup to the PDP-8/I computer program, is described. The program yields interplanar (d) spacings and (2theta) angle values from measurements made on an x-ray diffraction film of a powdered sample of a crystalline material. Use of the calculator provides accurate computations in a relatively rapid time interval when the PDP-8/I is not functioning because of downtime for repairs, maintenance, etc.
Date: February 22, 1977
Creator: Eckstein, R. R. & Ishida, Y. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Development of short pulse laser pumped x-ray lasers

Description: X-ray lasers have been extensively studied around the world since the first laboratory demonstration on the Novette laser at LLNL in 1984. The characteristic properties of short wavelength, high monochromaticity, collimation and coherence make x-ray lasers useful for various applications. These include demonstrations of biological imaging within the water window, interferometry of laser plasmas and radiography of laser-heated surfaces. One of the critical issues has been the high power pump required to produce the inversion. The power scaling as a function of x-ray laser wavelength follows a {approx} {lambda}{sup -4} to {approx} {lambda}{sup -6} law. The shortest x-ray laser wavelength of {approx}35 {angstrom} demonstrated for Ni-like Au was at the limit of Nova laser capabilities. By requiring large, high power lasers such as Nova, the shot rate and total number of shots available have limited the rapid development of x-ray lasers and applications. In fact over the last fifteen years the main thrust has been to develop more efficient, higher repetition rate x-ray lasers that can be readily scaled to shorter wavelengths. The recent state of progress in the field can be found in references. The objective of the project was to develop a soft x-ray laser (XRL) pumped by a short pulse laser of a few joules. In effect to demonstrate a robust, worlung tabletop x-ray laser at LLNL for the first time. The transient collisional scheme as proposed by Shlyaptsev et al. was the candidate x-ray laser for study. The successful endeavor of any scientific investigation is often based upon prudent early decisions and the choice of this scheme was both sound and fruitful. It had been demonstrated very recently for Ne-like Ti at 326 {angstrom} using a small tabletop laser but had not yet reached its full potential. We chose this scheme for several reasons: (a) it …
Date: February 22, 2000
Creator: Dunn, J; Osterheld, A L; Hunter, J R & Shlyaptsev, V N
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Sensor modules for wireless distributed sensor networks

Description: A national security need as well as environmental monitoring need exists for networks of sensors. The advantages of a network of sensors over a single sensor are improved range, sensitivity, directionality, and data readability. Depending upon the particular application, sensors can be acoustic, chemical, biological, thermal or inertial. A major desire in these sensor networks is to have the individual sensor and associated electronics small and low enough in power that the battery can also be small and of long life. Smaller, low power sensor nodes can allow more nodes per network. A typical network for security applications is depicted in Figure 1. Here a number of sensor nodes are deployed around a central hub node in a star configuration. In this scenario the hubs communicate with each other and ultimately relay information to a satellite. Future networks might follow this scenario or some other network architecture such as a hopping network where individual nodes communicate directly with each other. The focus of our research has been on development of the small low power nodes and less on the overall network topology. However, some consideration of the network must be given when designing the nodes and some consideration of the nodes must be given when designing the network. An individual sensor node contains not only the sensor but also the sensor interface electronics, analog to digital (A/D) converter, logic, RF communication link, antenna, and the battery. Future nodes will also contain some form of signal processing to allow more sophisticated network architectures. The FY98 goal for this project was to make a sensor node with a physical form factor of a 2 inch x 2 inch x 2 inch cube.
Date: February 22, 1999
Creator: Lee, A P; McConaghy, C F; Simon, J N; Benett, W; Jones, L & Trevino, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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3(omega) Damage: Growth Mitigation

Description: The design of high power UV laser systems is limited to a large extent by the laser-initiated damage performance of transmissive fused silica optical components. The 3{omega} (i.e., the third harmonic of the primary laser frequency) damage growth mitigation LDRD effort focused on understanding and reducing the rapid growth of laser-initiated surface damage on fused silica optics. Laser-initiated damage can be discussed in terms of two key issues: damage initiated at some type of precursor and rapid damage growth of the damage due to subsequent laser pulses. The objective of the LDRD effort has been the elucidation of laser-induced damage processes in order to quantify and potentially reduce the risk of damage to fused silica surfaces. The emphasis of the first two years of this effort was the characterization and reduction of damage initiation. In spite of significant reductions in the density of damage sites on polished surfaces, statistically some amount of damage initiation should always be expected. The early effort therefore emphasized the development of testing techniques that quantified the statistical nature of damage initiation on optical surfaces. This work led to the development of an optics lifetime modeling strategy that has been adopted by the NIF project to address damage-risk issues. During FY99 interest shifted to the damage growth issue which was the focus of the final year of this project. The impact of the remaining damage sites on laser performance can be minimized if the damage sites did not continue to grow following subsequent illumination. The objectives of the final year of the LDRD effort were to apply a suite of state-of-the-art characterization tools to elucidate the nature of the initiated damage sites, and to identify a method that effectively mitigates further damage growth. Our specific goal is to understand the cause for the rapid growth of …
Date: February 22, 2001
Creator: Kozlowski, M; Demos, S; Wu, Z-L; Wong, J; Penetrante, B & Hrubesh, L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Evaluation of P/M Ring Gear Using Computed Tomography and Ultrasonic Testing

Description: Ultrasonic (UT) and computed tomography (CT) evaluation of a P/M ring gear was performed at LLNL to characterize the gear and to determine the relative sensitivity of the two techniques to defects of interest. The features of concern lie at the root of the teeth and in layers along the sides of the teeth. These layers can be detected using metalography but success depends on chance and the number of sections polished. Much of the current focus is on improving the sensitivity of the CT scan and on better ways to evaluate the large data sets obtained. The initial data obtained showed anomalies close to the gear teeth as expected. Later data showed anomalies at other locations and in other orientations. Figure 3 shows a radiograph with vertical and horizontal CT slices through regions with anomalies.
Date: February 22, 2001
Creator: Haskins, J J & Martin, P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Intercomparison of Climate Data Sets as a Measure of Observational Uncertainty

Description: Uncertainties in climate observations are revealed when alternate observationally based data sets are compared. General circulation model-based ''reanalyses'' of meteorological observations will yield different results from different models, even if identical sets of raw unanalyzed data form their starting points. We have examined 25 longitude-latitude fields (including selected levels for three-dimensional quantities) encompassing atmospheric climate variables for which the PCMDI observational data base contains two or more high-quality sources. For the most part we compare ECMWF with NCEP reanalysis. In some cases, we compare in situ and/or satellite-derived data with reanalysis. To obtain an overview of the differences for all 25 fields, we use a graphical technique developed for climate model diagnosis: a ''portrait diagram'' displaying root-mean-square differences between the alternate data sources. With a few exceptions (arising from the requirement that RMS differences be normalized to accommodate different units of variables) the portrait diagrams indicate areas of agreement and disagreement that can be confirmed by examining traditional graphics such as zonal mean plots. In accord with conventional wisdom, the greatest agreement between alternate data sets--hence the smallest implied observational uncertainty--occurs for upper tropospheric zonal wind. We also find fairly good agreement between reanalysis and more direct measures of precipitation, suggesting that modern observational systems are resolving some long-standing problems with its measurement.
Date: February 22, 2002
Creator: Covey, C; Achuta Rao, K M; Fiorino, M; Gleckler, P J; Taylor, K E & Wehner, M F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Chemical Processing Department monthly report for January 1960

Description: Production of Pu nitrate, UO{sub 3}, and unfabricated Pu metal met schedules. Decontamination performance of Purex process continued below standard. The cerium-144 cask is being redesigned. A ``powered ferret``, for driving a scintillation counter through a conduit to monitor ground activity beneath waste storage tanks, is being designed.
Date: February 22, 1960
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Increased process water pressure to 105 buildings

Description: This document discusses increases in water pressure from the 190 Building process pumps which has been contemplated for a range of pressures up to 550 PSIG. The existing process pumps are dual units, consisting of a steam turbine driven primary pump operated: in series with an electric driven secondary pump. The secondary pumps installed in 100-B, D, F, and H Areas were designed for 400 PSIG working pressure, and were given factory hydrostatic tests of 600 PSIG. The 100-DR pumps were given factory hydrostatic tests of 650 PSIG. The Ingersoll-Rand Company advises that a working pressure of 425 PSIG is as high as they would-recommend for pump casing pressure on the secondary pumps. In consideration of problems incident to increased operating pressures, the immediate limiting factor is the total head pressure permissible on secondary pump casings. Other limiting factors are filter plant capacities, and 183 process water capacities.
Date: February 22, 1951
Creator: Measly, H. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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[Discussion by R. M. Evans at a meeting held with the members of the Military Liaison Committee on February 17, 1954]

Description: Characteristics of the heavy water moderated and cooled reactor when fueled with natural uranium were compared with those of Hanford. The following topics were covered: (1) fundamental safety of the Savannah River Plant reactor and its fundamental efficiency as neutron collector; (2) many critical volumes result in a complex control system and high sensitivity of flux pattern to rod position changes; (3) due to lack of time had to sue slugs initially; (4) had to use D{sub 2}O sparingly; (5) effects of circulating cooling system; and (6) heat transfer considerations. Topics also discussed were Savannah River reactor with enriched loadings and irradiation of thorium in lieu of lithium alloy.
Date: February 22, 1954
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Specifications for Multifunction Storage Unit Type I

Description: The Multifunction Storage Unit, Type I is a storage device capable of storing geometrical information in visual display form. The storage is accomplished by means of an electrostatic storage cathode ray tube. The Storage Unit consists of this storage tube and its associated circuitry. Associated circuitry is considered to be all circuitry required by the storage tube itself which is necessary to make the unit a self-contained storage unit. The following six external signals are all that is required in order to write, store and erase in the unit: vertical deflection signal, horizontal deflection signal, gate signal, z axis signal, erase signal (local or remote) and AC power. The erase signal causes the entire screen to be erased and primed for writing.
Date: February 22, 1966
Creator: Kubitz, W J & Rollenhagen, D C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Expansion task force: Old reactors speed of control for no overbore cases

Description: The Criteria for Speed of Control must be met for all cases being considered in the Expansion Studies. These Criteria are dependent upon the ratio Volume of water/volume of uranium in the process channel, the reactor power level, and the rate at which the vertical rods are released and inserted into the reactor. For those cases wherein the graphite channel is overbored by 0.200 inch., the criteria can generally be met for the power levels under consideration since the ratio of Vw/Vu is maintained adequately small by the use of large diameter fuel elements. If the graphite is not overbored, high pressure drop across the fuel element section must be maintained in order to maintain small values of Vw/Vu, which results in a substantial increase in the front header pressure. A method is developed in this document which ties together and defines the hydraulic and physics characteristics of the fuel-process channel geometry necessary to satisfy the Speed of Control Criteria over a range of feasible operating conditions. This study assumes no graphite overboring and employs throughout a smooth bore zircaloy process tube having an inside diameter of 1.650 inches. The fuel elements are self-supported., and the inner hole size was selected to provide an optimum flow split for corrosion considerations.
Date: February 22, 1960
Creator: Gilbert, W. D.; Carlson, P. A. & Nechodom, W. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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CPTF Run 5 flux monitoring

Description: No Description Available.
Date: February 22, 1971
Creator: Divine, J. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding: Spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

Description: The aim of this contract is to elucidate the mechanisms underlying adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effect of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations and other inorganic and polymeric species and solids of relevant mineralogy will also be determined. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability win be used to achieve the goals. The results of this study should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and also in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. Adsorption/desorption of tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (TTAC) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)/octaethylene glycol mono n-decyl ether (C{sub 12}EO{sub 8}) surfactant mixtures at the kaolinite-water and alumina-water interfaces was studied during this quarter. The microstructure of the adsorbed layer was investigated using spectroscopic techniques. Effect of the hydrocarbon chain length of octaethylene glycol mono n-alkyl ether (C{sub n}EO{sub 8}) type nonionic surfactants on the adsorption of 1:1 mixtures of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)/C{sub n}EO{sub 8} at the kaolinite/water interface was studied. The adsorption of SDS was enhanced by the presence of C{sub 10}EO{sub 8} but this effect was not as significant as those by C{sub 12--16}EO{sub 8}. Interestingly, once the hydrocarbon chain length of the nonionic surfactant exceeded that of the SDS (12) there was no further enhancement of SDS adsorption.
Date: February 22, 1994
Creator: Somasundaran, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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300 Area, February 12 through February 18

Description: Extrusion was run on one day, February 2, and a total of 271 billets (178 Type G, 12 type BT, and 81 red band) were processed. Two failures occurred among the red band billets; UM 6610 had begun to melt in the furnace and TX 3323 disintegrated on being extruded through the die. Samples of these billets are being checked chemically and metallurgically in an attempt to ascertain the cause for the hot-short characteristics of these billets. A sample cut from a rod which possessed zero strength (fell apart under no stress other than its own weight) at extrusion temperature was found to contain a large amount of microconstituent not ordinarily found in appreciable quantity on uranium sections. The distribution and appearance of the excess phase suggested at least partial liquation at the working temperature and it could, therefore, be responsible for the hot-short tendency.
Date: February 22, 1946
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Design, synthesis, and characterization of novel fine-particle, unsupported catalysts for coal liquefaction. Technical progress report, October 26, 1990--January 26, 1991: Draft

Description: The first task in our proposed study of catalysts for coal liquefaction was to prepare ultrafine dispersed metal sulfide particles by reactive precipitation from solutions of appropriate metal precursors. At this point, equipment to allow us to prepare these air-sensitive materials in an anaerobic environment has been acquired and assembled. Initial experiments aimed at synthesizing iron sulfide particles have been initiated. As part of the investigation of short contact time catalytic coal liquefaction, initial efforts focused on the noncatalytic pyrolysis reactions of coal and a model compound, Dibenzyl ether (DBE). Two different reactor configurations were examined; catalytic experiments are planned for the coming month.
Date: February 22, 1991
Creator: Klein, M. T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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TDNA Monthly Office Manager's Report: January/February 2005

Description: Monthly report written by the Texas Daily Newspaper Association's (TDNA's) office manager, Darla Thompson, to Ken Whalen providing a summary of revenues and account balances, programs, meetings, and other activities in the office during the previous months.
Date: February 22, 2005
Creator: Thompson, Darla
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
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100-K Area electrical power system load and voltage study for project CG-775. Revision

Description: The proposed increased water capacity for 100-K plants will increase the electrical load to be supplied. The load study showed that the capacity of the existing 13.8 kV system is adequate to carry the increased loads proposed for Project CG-775, while for the 5 kV system, an expanded power system is proposed. Likewise, the voltage regulation on the kV system bus will be excessive, and voltage regulators should be added.
Date: February 22, 1960
Creator: Thorson, W. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Precision of source response inside dimpled HAD brass tubes

Description: We have measured the variation in response of the {sup 137}CS source as positioned in 10 samples of the brass source tubes, dimpled at {plus_minus}5 cm from the center of a scintillator tile. We find an RMS in the signals of 2.5%.
Date: February 22, 1993
Creator: Jankowski, D. J. & Stanek, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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