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Nuclear Medicine Program progress report for quarter ending September 30, 1991

Description: Rat tissue distribution properties of IQNP,'' a new radioiodinated cholinergic-muscarinic receptor antagonist, are described. IQNP is the acronym for 1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl {alpha}-hydroxy-{alpha}-phenyl-{alpha}(1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl) acetate, which is an analogue of the QNB muscarinic antagonist in which the p-iodophenyl moiety has been replaced with the 1-iodo-1-propen-3-yl moiety. The radioiodinated IQNP analogue is easier to prepare in much higher yields than QNB and is thus a candidate for the evaluation of muscarinic receptors by external imaging techniques. Studies in rats demonstrated that IQNP shows high uptake in those cerebral regions rich in muscarinic receptors QNB-treatment of rats either 1 h before (pre) or 2 h after (post) administration of radioiodinated IQNP resulted in significant displacement or blocking of cerebral specific IQNP uptake (% dose/gm) in the cortex and striatum. These studies demonstrate that IQNP has specificity for the cholinergic-muscarinic receptor and is a good candidate for further studies. Also during this period, several agents developed in the ORNL Nuclear Medicine Program were supplied to Medical Cooperative Programs for collaborative studies including the iodine-125-labeled BMIPP and DMIPP fatty acid analogues and the IPM antibody labeling agent. Tin-117m and gold-199 were produced in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and supplied to the OHER-supported program in the Medical Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory to aid in their research until the re-start of the High Flux Brookhaven Reactor.
Date: February 1, 1992
Creator: Knapp, F. F., Jr.; Ambrose, K. R.; Callahan, A. P.; McPherson, D. W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P. C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of AFBC co-firing of coal and hospital wastes

Description: The purpose of this program is to expand the use of coal by utilizing CFB (circulating fluidized bed) technology to provide an environmentally safe method for disposing of waste materials. Hospitals are currently experiencing a waste management crisis. In many instances, they are no longer permitted to burn pathological and infectious wastes in incinerators. Older hospital incinerators are not capable of maintaining the stable temperatures and residence times necessary in order to completely destroy toxic substances before release into the atmosphere. In addition, the number of available landfills which can safely handle these substances is decreasing each year. The purpose of this project is to conduct necessary research investigating whether the combustion of the hospital wastes in a coal-fired circulating fluidized bed boiler will effectively destroy dioxins and other hazardous substances before release into the atmosphere. If this is proven feasible, in light of the quantity of hospital wastes generated each year, it would create a new market for coal -- possibly 50 million tons/year.
Date: February 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Review of PGDP assessment of criticality safety problems in increasing product assay to 5 wt % /sup 235/U

Description: Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) performed an evaluation of the PGDP facilities to determine the feasibility of increasing product assay from 2.0 wt % to 5.0 wt % /sup 235/U and to determine the impact of this increase on plant criticality safety; their conclusions are reported in KY-710. This report critiques the methods used and conclusions reached in KY-710. 4 figures, 5 tables.
Date: February 1, 1985
Creator: Petrie, L.M.; Turner, J.C. & Stewart, G.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design and operation of a geopressurized-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant

Description: Geopressured-geothermal resources can contribute significantly to the national electricity supply once technical and economic obstacles are overcome. Power plant performance under the harsh conditions of a geopressured resource was unproven, so a demonstration power plant was built and operated on the Pleasant Bayou geopressured resource in Texas. This one megawatt facility provided valuable data over a range of operating conditions. This power plant was a first-of-a-kind demonstration of the hybrid cycle concept. A hybrid cycle was used to take advantage of the fact that geopressured resources contain energy in more than one form -- hot water and natural gas. Studies have shown that hybrid cycles can yield thirty percent more power than stand-alone geothermal and fossil fuel power plants operating on the same resource. In the hybrid cycle at Pleasant Bayou, gas was burned in engines to generate electricity directly. Exhaust heat from the engines was then combined with heat from the brine to generate additional electricity in a binary cycle. Heat from the gas engine was available at high temperature, thus improving the efficiency of the binary portion of the hybrid cycle. Design power output was achieved, and 3445 MWh of power were sold to the local utility over the course of the test. Plant availability was 97.5% and the capacity factor was over 80% for the extended run at maximum power production. The hybrid cycle power plant demonstrated that there are no technical obstacles to electricity generation at Pleasant Bayou. 14 refs., 38 figs., 16 tabs.
Date: February 1, 1991
Creator: Campbell, R.G. & Hattar, M.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies

Description: The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.
Date: February 1, 1980
Creator: Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W. & Rifkin, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Temperature effects on waste glass performance

Description: The temperature dependence of glass durability, particularly that of nuclear waste glasses, is assessed by reviewing past studies. The reaction mechanism for glass dissolution in water is complex and involves multiple simultaneous reaction proceeded, including molecular water diffusion, ion exchange, surface reaction, and precipitation. These processes can change in relative importance or dominance with time or changes in temperature. The temperature dependence of each reaction process has been shown to follow an Arrhenius relationship in studies where the reaction process has been isolated, but the overall temperature dependence for nuclear waste glass reaction mechanisms is less well understood, Nuclear waste glass studies have often neglected to identify and characterize the reaction mechanism because of difficulties in performing microanalyses; thus, it is unclear if such results can be extrapolated to other temperatures or reaction times. Recent developments in analytical capabilities suggest that investigations of nuclear waste glass reactions with water can lead to better understandings of their reaction mechanisms and their temperature dependences. Until a better understanding of glass reaction mechanisms is available, caution should be exercised in using temperature as an accelerating parameter. 76 refs., 1 tab.
Date: February 1, 1991
Creator: Mazer, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SIMMER II analysis of the CAMEL II C6 and C7 experiments (simulated fuel penetration into a primary control assembly)

Description: The CAMEL C6 and C7 tests, performed at Argonne National Laboratory, simulated asymmetric midplane fuel injection into a nonvoided fully withdrawn primary control assembly during the meltdown phase of a hypothetical core-disruptive accident in a liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor. These tests were modeled with no a priori knowledge of the experimental results using the SIMMER-II code. Subsequent comparison of calculations with experimental results showed good agreement. 21 figures, 3 tables.
Date: February 1, 1985
Creator: DeVault, G.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Studies on relative effects of charged and neutral defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

Description: This report covers the third year of a continuing research study to understand the relative importance of charged and neutral defects in amorphous silicon. The objective of the study is to explore the electronic structure, including neutral and charged defects, an optoelectronic effects including the formation of Staebler-Wronski defects. The study concentrated on exploring electroluminescence experimentally and interpreting the results employing a simple guiding model. The simple guiding model assumes an exponential density of states and recombination rate constants (radiative and non-radiative) which are governed by hopping transitions. Measurements were also made as a function of photodegradation of the material. The results implicate that the radiative recombination processes are not distant pair tunneling but rather results from electrons hopping down due to the coulomb interactions. Preliminary experiments have been made on the effect of photodegradation on transient space charge limited currents in n/i/n structures. These experiments can directly yield information on the occupied defects centers induced by the photodegradation and are not a result of recombination processes. To date the results seems to be consistent with a picture which places the doubly occupied defects at quite a high energy ({approx equal} 0.4 e.v. below the conduction band).
Date: February 1, 1992
Creator: Silver, M. (North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Resource use: a summary of the assessments of geothermal resource use limitations of Bruneau KGRA, Castle Creek KGRA, Crane Creek KGRA, Mountain Home KGRA, Vulcan KGRA

Description: A brief overview is given of the physical, socioeconomic, and heritage resources of each KGRA summarized from the draft reports submitted to EG and G by subcontractors for this project. Included under the subheading of Physical Environment are geology, topography, and ecology with brief mention of climate, hydrology, and soils. Under Socioeconomic and Heritage Resources are demographic and economic data, land use and ownership, and known prehistoric and historic features. The information gaps are listed.
Date: February 23, 1979
Creator: Moore, B.; Savage, N.; Gladwell, J.S. & Warnick, C.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The graph representation approach to topological field theory in 2 + 1 dimensions

Description: An alternative definition of topological quantum field theory in 2+1 dimensions is discussed. The fundamental objects in this approach are not gauge fields as in the usual approach, but non-local observables associated with graphs. The classical theory of graphs is defined by postulating a simple diagrammatic rule for computing the Poisson bracket of any two graphs. The theory is quantized by exhibiting a quantum deformation of the classical Poisson bracket algebra, which is realized as a commutator algebra on a Hilbert space of states. The wavefunctions in this graph representation'' approach are functionals on an appropriate set of graphs. This is in contrast to the usual connection representation'' approach in which the theory is defined in terms of a gauge field and the wavefunctions are functionals on the space of flat spatial connections modulo gauge transformations.
Date: February 1, 1991
Creator: Martin, S.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technology applications bulletins: Number one

Description: Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), operates five facilities for the US Department of Energy (DOE): the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which is a large, multidisciplinary research and development (R and D) center whose primary mission is energy research; the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, which engages in defense research, development, and production; and the uranium-enrichment plants at Oak Ridge; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. Much of the research carried out at these facilities is of interest to industry and to state or local governments. To make information about this research available, the Energy Systems Office of Technology Applications publishes brief descriptions of selected technologies and reports. These technology applications bulletins describe the new technology and inform the reader about how to obtain further information, gain access to technical resources, and initiate direct contact with Energy Systems researchers.
Date: February 1, 1989
Creator: Koncinski, W. Jr. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stochastic analysis of contaminant transport

Description: A reliability algorithm is used to develop probabilistic (stochastic) models or contaminant transport in porous media. The models are based on advective-dispersive transport equations, and utilize the reliability algorithm with existing one- and two-dimensional analytical and numerical solutions. Uncertain variables in the models include: groundwater flow velocity (or permeability in the numerical model), dispersivity, diffusion coefficient, bulk density, porosity, and solute distribution coefficient. Each uncertain variable is assigned a mean, covariance, and marginal distribution. The models yield an estimate of the probability that the contaminant concentration will equal or exceed a target concentration at a selected location and time. The models also yield probabilistic sensitivity measures which identify those uncertain variables with most influence on the probabilistic outcome. The objective of this study is to examine the basic behavior and develop general conclusions regarding transport under certain conditions as modeled using a reliability approach.
Date: February 1, 1992
Creator: Cawlfield, J.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FMG, RENUM, LINEL, ELLFMG, ELLP, and DIMES: Chain of programs for calculating and analyzing fluid flow through two-dimensional fracture networks -- theory and design

Description: This report describes some of the programs developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for network modelling. By themselves, these programs form a complete chain for the study of the equivalent permeability of two-dimensional fracture networks. FMG generates the fractures considered as line discontinuities, with any desired distribution of aperture, length, and orientation. The locations of these fractures on a plane can be either specified or generated randomly. The intersections of these fractures with each other, and with the boundaries of a specified flow region, are determined, and a finite element line network is output. RENUM is a line network optimizer. Nodes very close to each other are merged, deadends are removed, and the nodes are then renumbered in order to minimize the bandwidth of the corresponding linear system of equations. LINEL computes the steady state flux through a mesh of line elements previously processed by program RENUM. Equivalent directional permeabilities are output. ELLFMG determines the three components of the permeability tensor which best fits the directional permeabilities output by LINEL. A measure of the goodness fit is also computed. Two plotting programs, DIMES and ELLP, help visualize the outputs of these programs. DIMES plots the line network at various stages of the process. ELLP plots the equivalent permeability results. 14 refs., 25 figs.
Date: February 1, 1988
Creator: Billaux, Daniel; Bodea, Sorin & Long, Jane
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility study for Boardman River hydroelectric power. Final report

Description: The feasibility of generating additional hydroelectric power from five consecutive existing dams located on the Boardman River in Grand Traverse County and Traverse City, Michigan, was investigated. The potential hydropower production capabilities, in terms of base load power and peak load power, the legal-institutional-environmental constraints, and the economic feasibility, including capital investment, operating costs and maintenance costs, were evaluated for each of the five dam sites individually and as a series of co-dependent facilities. The impact of installing fish passages at each site was analyzed separately. The feasibility assessment utilized the present worth analytical method, considering revenue based on thirty mills/kWh for power, 0.4% general economy escalation rate, and a 6% net income to the municipal utility. The sensitivity of fuel costs increasing at a different rate than the general price-escalation was tested by allowing the increase in fuel costs to vary from 3 to 8% per year. Assuming fuel costs increase at the same rate as the general economy, it is feasible to update, retrofit, renovate, and install hydroelectric generating capacity at Sabin, Boardman and Brown Bridge. Rehabilitation of Union Street and Keystone is also feasible but somewhat less attractive. Operating the dams as a co-dependent system has environmental advantages and can provide additional revenue through peak load power rates. A development plan to implement the above is outlined utilizing an ownership arrangement whereby Grand Traverse County provides easements for Sabin and Boardman Dams. The plan calls for operation of the system by Traverse City.
Date: February 22, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

International Impacts of Global Climate Change: Testimony to House Appropriations Subcommittee on Foreign Operations, Export Financing and Related Programs

Description: International impacts of global climate change are those for which the important consequences arise because of national sovereignty. Such impacts could be of two types: (1) migrations across national borders of people, of resources (such as agricultural productivity, or surface water, or natural ecosystems), of effluents, or of patterns of commerce; and (2) changes to the way nations use and manage their resources, particularly fossil fuels and forests, as a consequence of international concern over the global climate. Actions by a few resource-dominant nations may affect the fate of all. These two types of international impacts raise complex equity issues because one nation may perceive itself as gaining at the expense of its neighbors, or it may perceive itself as a victim of the actions of others. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.
Date: February 21, 1989
Creator: Fulkerson, W.; Cushman, R.M.; Marland, G. & Rayner, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Large area silicon sheet by EFG. Annual progress report, October 1, 1977-September 30, 1978

Description: Progress in EFG ribbon growth was made in a number of areas as follows: (1) Multiple growth for ribbons 5 cm in width was demonstrated in two runs of 12 and 20 hours' duration. (2) A new single cartridge crystal growth station, designated Machine 17, was built. It has vastly expanded observational capacity by virture of an anamorphic optical-video system which allows close observation of the meniscus over 7.5 cm in width, as well as video taping of the ribbon growth process for further analysis. Also, a number of mechanical advances were incorporated into this equipment. (3) Growth Station No. 1 achieved reproducible and reliable growth of 7.5 cm wide ribbon at speeds up to 4 cm/min. (4) A major advance in cartridge design, the mini cold shoe, was introduced. (5) Interface shaping using the displaced die concept led to significant increases in cell efficiency. Large area cells (2.5 by 7.5 cm/sup 2/, 2.5 x 10 cm/sup 2/, and 7.5 by 7.5 cm/sup 2/), which achieve efficiencies over 9%, have been made in significant numbers. (6) The role of gaseous impurities in cartridge furnaces has been clarified and their destabilizing influence on growth has been brought under control. Details of most of these developments are discussed.
Date: February 16, 1979
Creator: Wald, F.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Theoretical studies of lower hybrid current drive and ion-cyclotron heating in tokamaks

Description: A computational model for PLT lower hybrid current drive and ramp-up experiments combines a parallel velocity Fokker-Planck treatment of lower hybrid current drive with minor radius flux diffusion and toroidal ray-tracing wave propagation. Computational and experimental results are in good accord. Analytic solutions of the two-dimensional velocity space (v/sub perpendicular/, v/sub parallel/) diffusion problem give values of the current drive parameter J/P/sub d/ which agree with numerical results, both relativistically and nonrelativistically. Turning to ICRF heating, two new all-metal antenna designs will permit power flux up to 10 kW/cm/sup 2/. A full wave solution to the magnetosonic wave equation, based on the parabolic method, yields cylindrical convergence and treats the diffraction limitation on intensity correctly. Mode conversion with energy absorption has been added to the BALDUR ICRF modeling code. A Fokker-Planck treatment of high energy ion tail formation by ICRF finds that enhanced thermonuclear reactivity can occur.
Date: February 1, 1985
Creator: Perkins, F.W.; Valeo, E.J.; Eder, D.C.; Hwang, D.Q.; Jobes, F.; Phillips, C.K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Kinetics of combustion-related processes at high temperatures

Description: Again this year, progress is mainly reflected in publications. The following lists titles published, in press, or submitted during late 1990--91. Tunable Laser Flash Absorption, High Temperature Pyrolyses of Acetylene and Diacetylene Behind Reflected Shock Waves, Rate of the Retro-Diels-Alder Dissociation of 1,2,3,6-Tetrahydropyridine Over a Wide Temperature Range, The Reaction of C{sub 4}H{sub 2} and H{sub 2} Behind Reflected Shock Waves, Thermal Isomerization of Cyclopropanecarbonitrile, The Homogeneous Pyrolysis of Acetylene II, The Importance Of Hindered Rotations and Other Anharmonic Effects in the Thermal Dissociation of Small Unsaturated Molecules, Dissociation Rates of Propyne and Allene at High Temperatures and the Subsequent Formation of Benzene, and The Formaldehyde Decomposition Chain Mechanism. This report consists of the abstracts, titles, and authors for each of these publications.
Date: February 1, 1992
Creator: Kiefer, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Theory of energetic trapped particle-induced resistive interchange-ballooning modes

Description: A theory describing the influence of energetic trapped particles on resistive interchange-ballooning modes in tokamaks is presented. It is shown that a population of hot particles trapped in the region of adverse curvature can resonantly interact with and destabilize the resistive interchange mode, which is stable in their absence because of favorable average curvature. The mode is different from the usual resistive interchange mode not only in its destabilization mechanism, but also in that it has a real component to its frequency comparable to the precessional drift frequency of the rapidly circulating energetic species. Corresponding growth rate and threshold conditions for this trapped-particle-driven instability are derived and finite banana width effects are shown to have a stabilizing effect on the mode. Finally, the ballooning/tearing dispersion relation is generalized to include hot particles, so that both the ideal and the resistive modes are derivable in the appropriate limits. 23 refs., 7 figs.
Date: February 1, 1986
Creator: Biglari, H. & Chen, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cost analysis in support of minimum energy standards for clothes washers and dryers

Description: The results of the cost analysis of energy conservation design options for laundry products are presented. The analysis was conducted using two approaches. The first, is directed toward the development of industrial engineering cost estimates of each energy conservation option. This approach results in the estimation of manufacturers costs. The second approach is directed toward determining the market price differential of energy conservation features. The results of this approach are shown. The market cost represents the cost to the consumer. It is the final cost, and therefore includes distribution costs as well as manufacturing costs.
Date: February 2, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geochemical information for sites contaminated with low-level radioactive wastes. III. Weldon Spring Storage Site

Description: The Weldon Spring Storage Site (WSSS), which includes both the chemical site and the quarry, became radioactively contaminated as the result of wastes that were being stored from operations to recover uranium from pitchblende ores in the 1940s and 1950s. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering various remedial action options for the WSSS. This report describes the results of geochemical investigations carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support these activities and to help quantify various remedial action options. Soil and groundwater samples were characterized, and uranium and radium sorption ratios were measured in site soil/groundwater systems by batch contact methodology. Soil samples from various locations around the raffinate pits were found to contain major amounts of silica, along with illite as the primary clay constituent. Particle sizes of the five soil samples were variable (50% distribution point ranging from 12 to 81 ..mu..m); the surface areas varied from 13 to 62 m/sup 2//g. Elemental analysis of the samples showed them to be typical of sandy clay and silty clay soils. Groundwater samples included solution from Pit 3 and well water from Well D. Anion analyses showed significant concentrations of sulfate and nitrate (>350 and >7000 mg/L, respectively) in the solution from Pit 3. These anions were also present in the well water, but in lower concentrations. Uranium sorption ratios for four of the soil samples contacted with the solution from Pit 3 were moderate to high (approx. 300 to approx. 1000 mL/g). The fifth sample had a ratio of only 12 mL/g. Radium sorption ratios for the five samples were moderate to high (approx. 600 to approx. 1000 mL/g). These values indicate that soil at the WSSS may show favorable retardation of uranium and radium in the groundwater. 13 references, 13 figures, 10 tables.
Date: February 1, 1985
Creator: Seeley, F.G. & Kelmers, A.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal hydraulic study of the ESPRESSO blanket for a Tandem Mirror Reactor

Description: This paper deals primarily with the thermal-hydraulic design and some critical thermomechanical aspects of the proposed ESPRESSO blanket for the Tandem Mirror Fusion Reactor. This conceptual design was based on the same physics as used in the MARS study.
Date: February 1, 1986
Creator: Raffray, A.R. & Hoffman, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Magnetoresistance, electrical conductivity, and Hall effect of glassy carbon

Description: These properties of glassy carbon heat treated for three hours between 1200 and 2700/sup 0/C were measured from 3 to 300/sup 0/K in magnetic fields up to 5 tesla. The magnetoresistance was generally negative and saturated with reciprocal temperature, but still increased as a function of magnetic field. The maximum negative magnetoresistance measured was 2.2% for 2700/sup 0/C material. Several models based on the negative magnetoresistance being proportional to the square of the magnetic moment were attempted; the best fit was obtained for the simplest model combining Curie and Pauli paramagnetism for heat treatments above 1600/sup 0/C. Positive magnetoresistance was found only in less than 1600/sup 0/C treated glassy carbon. The electrical conductivity, of the order of 200 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at room temperature, can be empirically written as sigma = A + Bexp(-CT/sup -1/4) - DT/sup -1/2. The Hall coefficient was independent of magnetic field, insensitive to temperature, but was a strong function of heat treatment temperature, crossing over from negative to positive at about 1700/sup 0/C and ranging from -0.048 to 0.126 cm/sup 3//coul. The idea of one-dimensional filaments in glassy carbon suggested by the electrical conductivity is compatible with the present consensus view of the microstructure.
Date: February 1, 1983
Creator: Baker, D.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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