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Beneficiation of Chromite Ores From Western United States

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines on the sampling of chrome ore deposits in the western United States. Physical properties of the samples collected are presented. This report includes tables.
Date: June 1947
Creator: Batty, J. V.; Mitchell, T. F.; Havens, R. & Wells, R. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Exploration of the Avon Mica District, Latah County, Idaho

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines on the investigations conducted on the mica deposits found in Latah County, Idaho. Characteristics and properties of the mica deposits are listed. This report includes tables, and maps.
Date: July 1946
Creator: Reed, Glen C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Blackbird Cobalt Deposits, Lemhi County, Idaho

Description: Report from the U.S. Bureau of Mines on exploration of known cobalt ore deposits in Lemhi County, Idaho. Physical features of the area, and properties of the cobalt samples collected are presented. This report includes tables, maps, and illustrations.
Date: February 1947
Creator: Reed, G. C. & Herdlick, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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United States Earthquakes, 1944

Description: Report discussing earthquake activity in the United States during 1944. The report is broken down by regions and has sections for specific earthquakes.
Date: 1944
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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2005 Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Carey Creek Project

Description: In August 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Carey Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Carey Creek Project provides a total of 172.95 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 4.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetlands provide 52.68 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 2.82 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow and grassland meadow provide 98.13 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Emergent wetlands provide 11.53 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Open water provides 2.88 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Carey Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.
Date: June 2005
Creator: Entz, Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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2005 Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Priest River Project

Description: On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 140.73 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 60.05 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow habitat provides 7.39 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 71.13 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Open water habitat provides 2.16 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. The objective of using HEP at the Priest River Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.
Date: May 2005
Creator: Entz, Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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2005 Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the North Eaton Lake Project

Description: On July 6, 2005, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the North Eaton Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The North Eaton Lake Project provides a total of 235.05 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 9.38 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Emergent wetland habitat provides 11.36 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Forested wetland provides 10.97 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 203.34 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the North Eaton Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.
Date: November 2005
Creator: Entz, Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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2005 Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Beaver Lake Project

Description: On August 14, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 232.26 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 136.58 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 20.02 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetland habitat provides 7.67 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 22.69 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetlands provide 35.04 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Open water provided 10.26 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.
Date: May 2005
Creator: Entz, Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

2005 Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the West Beaver Lake Project

Description: On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 103.08 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 7.17 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Conifer forest habitat provides 95.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.
Date: February 28, 2005
Creator: Entz, Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

2005 Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Gamblin Lake Project

Description: On August 12, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Gamblin Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Gamblin Lake Project provides a total of 273.28 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 127.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 21.06 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow provides 78.05 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetland habitat provides 46.25 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the Gamblin Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.
Date: May 2005
Creator: Entz, Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

2005 Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Priest River Project

Description: On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 105.41 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 26.95 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland habitat provides 23.78 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scmb-shrub vegetation provides 54.68 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer.
Date: February 28, 2005
Creator: Entz, Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Some Belt Rocks, Montana and Idaho

Description: A report which compares 20,000 feet of Belt rocks in the Mission Mountains Primitive Area in Montana with 40,000 feet of Belt rocks in the Pend Oreille area in Idaho and Montana.
Date: 1970
Creator: Harrison, J. E. & Grimes, D. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Geology of the Clark Fork Quadrangle Idaho-Montana

Description: A report about the Clark Fork quadrangle which is underlain by more than 38,000 feet of low-grade metasedimentary rocks of the Precambrian Belt series. The quadrangle has both metallic and nonmetallic mineral deposits of considerable value.
Date: 1963
Creator: Harrison, J. E. & Jobin, D. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Idaho: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM, Part A

Description: All chemical data for geothermal fluids in Idaho available as of December 1981 is maintained on GEOTHERM, computerized information system. This report presents summaries and sources of records for Idaho. 7 refs. (ACR)
Date: July 1, 1983
Creator: Bliss, J. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Investigations in the Fall Creek Area, Bonneville County, Idaho, During the 1952 Field Season: A Preliminary Report

Description: Introduction: Field work during the 1952 field season has supplied new data on the areal extent, composition, and estimated reserves of uranium-bearing carbonaceous rocks in the Fall Creek.area, Bonneville County, Idaho. The following is a preliminary report of progress to describe these new data which supplement the information contained in Trace Elements Memorandum Report 340 (Vine and Moore, 1952). This work was done on behalf of the Division of Raw Materials of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission.
Date: November 1952
Creator: Vine, James David
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Reconnaissance Geology of Placer Deposits Containing Radioactive Minerals in the Bear Valley District, Valley County, Idaho

Description: From introduction: The Bear Valley district is situated in southwestern Idaho, in the drainage of the Middle Fork of the Salmon River (see fig. 1). The placer deposits were drilled by the U. S. Bureau of Mines in 1951 and 1952 to determine their content of monazite and "radioactive black minerals" (here referred to loosely as "radioactive blacks"). The purpose of the study outlined here was to provide a geologic background for an understanding of the origin and distribution of the placer minerals.
Date: January 1953
Creator: Mackin, J. Hoover & Schmidt, Dwight Lyman
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A Preliminary Summary Report of a Reconnaissance of Sandstone-Type Copper-Uranium Deposits in Parts of New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming

Description: From introduction: The reconnaissance was made during the summer of 1951 by two field parties: (1) a reconnaissance in parts of Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona by Russell Gibson, and (2) Geological Survey reconnaissance in parts of New Mexico,.Colorado, Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming (by the writers), the results of which are summarized in this report.
Date: December 1951
Creator: Gott, Garland B. & Erickson, Ralph Leroy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Preliminary Report of Reconnaissance for Uraniferous Granitic Rocks in Montana, Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and California

Description: From abstract: A reconnaissance to determine the uranium content of granitic rocks in the western states was made during parts of October and November 1951. The paucity of our knowledge of the granitic rocks that are most likely to contain significant quantities of uranium has prevented all but a very general isolation of areas or types of granitic rocks for reconnaissance examination.
Date: April 1952
Creator: Coats, Robert Roy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Garm-Lamoreaux Mine, Lemhi County, Idaho

Description: From abstract: The Garm-Lamoreaux property, Lemhi County, Idaho is known to have uraninite and zippeite on two of its dumps. The property has been explored by five adits, two of which are now caved, and one of which is partly caved. The country rock is schistose micaceous quartzite and argillaceous quartzite of Belt age. An east-west fault cuts the quartzite, and the Lamoreaux vein, a gold-sulfide-quartz veins occurs in the fault. The uranium minerals are believed to have core from the vein, on the now inaccessible No. 3 level.
Date: January 1954
Creator: Armstrong, Frank C. & Weis, Paul L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Uranium Occurrence at the Crescent Mine, Shoshone County, Idaho

Description: From abstract: Uranium on the Hooper Tunnel level of the Crescent mine, Shoshone county, Idaho, occurs in two red, iron oxide-stained radioactive zones in and along the hanging wall of Alhambra fault.
Date: September 1954
Creator: Armstrong, Frank C. & Weis, Paul L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Idaho: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM. Part B

Description: This compilation contains chemical data for geothermal fluids in Idaho available as of December, 1981. The 951 records contain data on location, sample description, analysis type, collection condition, flow rates, and the chemical and physical properties of the fluid. Stable and radioactive isotope data are occasionally available. 6 refs.
Date: August 1, 1983
Creator: Bliss, J. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Preliminary Report on the Mineral Hill Monazite Deposits, Lemhi County, Idaho

Description: From abstract: The Mineral Hill monazite deposits, 3 to 5 miles northeast of the town of Shoup, Lemhi County, Idaho, were investigated by the U. S. Geological Survey in July 1952. The deposits are replacement veins and lenses along shears in a pendant, principally of pre-Cambrian biotite gniess, about 4 to 5 miles in size and enclosed by granite of the Idaho batholith. The veins consist predominantly of calcite, monazite, and allanite, and contain minor quantities of barite, magnetite, rutile, and apatite.
Date: April 1953
Creator: Sharp, W. N. & Cavender, W. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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