Search Results

Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory (Part 2)

Description: Methane (CH{sub 4}) in natural gas is a major energy source in the U.S., and is used extensively on Alaska's North Slope, including the oilfields in Prudhoe Bay, the community of Barrow, and the National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska (NPRA). Smaller villages, however, are dependent on imported diesel fuel for both power and heating, resulting in some of the highest energy costs in the U.S. and crippling local economies. Numerous CH{sub 4} gas seeps have been observed on wetlands near Atqasuk, Alaska (in the NPRA), and initial measurements have indicated flow rates of 3,000-5,000 ft{sup 3} day{sup -1} (60-100 kg CH{sub 4} day{sup -1}). Gas samples collected in 1996 indicated biogenic origin, although more recent sampling indicated a mixture of biogenic and thermogenic gas. In this study, we (1) quantified the amount of CH{sub 4} generated by several seeps and evaluated their potential use as an unconventional gas source for the village of Atqasuk; (2) collected gas and analyzed its composition from multiple seeps several miles apart to see if the source is the same, or if gas is being generated locally from isolated biogenic sources; and (3) assessed the potential magnitude of natural CH{sub 4} gas seeps for future use in climate change modeling.
Date: December 31, 2008
Creator: 960443, See OSTI ID Number
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory (Part 3)

Description: Various laboratory tests were carried at the R & D facility of BJ Services in Tomball, TX with BJ Services staff to predict and evaluate the performance of the Ceramicrete slurry for its effective use in permafrost cementing operations. Although other standards such as those of the American Standard for Testing Materials (ASTM) and Construction Specification Institute (CSI) exist, all these tests were standardized by the API. A summary of the tests traditionally used in the cement slurry design as well as the API tests reference document are provided in Table 7. All of these tests were performed within the scope of this research to evaluate properties of the Ceramicrete.
Date: December 31, 2008
Creator: 960443, See OSTI ID Number
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FINAL REPORT TESTING OF IRON PHOSPHATE LAW GLASS (VSL-11R2340-1) 04/25/2011 REV 0 06/10/2011

Description: About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently stored in underground tanks at The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity waste fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHLW product will likely be directed to a national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILA W and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. The objectives of the work reported herein were to assess the corrosion of Inconel 690 and 693 in the FeP glass developed by MS&T and to measure key high temperature properties of the LAW iron phosphate glass. Specific objectives of these tests were the following: (1) Determination of the extent of corrosion of Inconel 690 and 693 in LAW FeP glass at 1050, 1l00, and 1150 C; (2) Determination of the extent of corrosion of Inconel 690 and 693 in LAW FeP glass in the presence of an electric field; (3) Measurement of the high temperature specific heat of the LAW FeP glass; (4) Measurement of the high temperature density of the LAW FeP glass; (5) Measurement of the high temperature thermal diffusivity of the LAW FeP glass; and (6) Calculation of the high temperature thermal conductivity of the LAW FeP glass from the above three measured properties.
Date: August 31, 2011
Creator: AA, KRUGER; AL, GAN H ET; I, JOSEPH; AC, BEUCHELE; Z, FENG; C, WANG et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ERROR REDUCTION IN DUCT LEAKAGE TESTING THROUGH DATA CROSS-CHECKS

Description: One way to reduce uncertainty in scientific measurement is to devise a protocol in which more quantities are measured than are absolutely required, so that the result is over constrained. This report develops a method for so combining data from two different tests for air leakage in residential duct systems. An algorithm, which depends on the uncertainty estimates for the measured quantities, optimizes the use of the excess data. In many cases it can significantly reduce the error bar on at least one of the two measured duct leakage rates (supply or return), and it provides a rational method of reconciling any conflicting results from the two leakage tests.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: ANDREWS, J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ENERGY SAVINGS POTENTIALS IN RESIDENTIAL AND SMALL COMMERCIAL THERMAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS - AN UPDATE

Description: This is an update of a report (Andrews and Modera 1991) that quantified the amounts of energy that could be saved through better thermal distribution systems in residential and small commercial buildings. Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork, piping, or other means used to transport heat or cooling from the space-conditioning equipment to the conditioned space. This update involves no basic change in methodology relative to the 1991 report, but rather a review of the additional information available in 2003 on the energy-use patterns in residential and small commercial buildings.
Date: October 31, 2003
Creator: ANDREWS,J. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A HISTORY OF ASHRAE STANDARDS 152P.

Description: The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) has been developing a standard test method for evaluating the efficiency of ducts and other types of thermal distribution systems in single-family residential buildings. This report presents an overview of the structure, function, and historical development of this test method.
Date: October 31, 2003
Creator: ANDREWS,J. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results from the Soviet-American gallium experiment

Description: A radiochemical {sup 71}Ga-{sup 71}Ge experiment to determine the primary flux of neutrinos from the Sun has begun operation at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory. The number of {sup 71}Ge atoms extracted from thirty tons of gallium was measured in five runs during the period of January to July 1990. Assuming that the extraction efficiency for {sup 71}Ge atoms produced by solar neutrinos is the same as from natural Ge carrier, we observed the capture rate to be 20 + 15/{minus}20 (stat) {plus_minus} 32 (syst) SNU, resulting in a limit of less than 79 SNU (90% CL). This is to be compared with 132 SNU predicted by the Standard Solar Model.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Abazov, A. I.; Anosov, O. L.; Faizov, E. L.; Gavrin, V. N.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Knodel, T. V. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An engineering and economic evaluation of the methane de-NOX{sup SM} technology

Description: The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) and Ogden Martin Systems, Inc. (OMS) are conducting joint engineering and economic evaluation of IGT`s METHANE de-NOX{sup SM} technology for its application to new, as well as retrofit, municipal waste combustors (MWCs). It is anticipated that this new technology offers a technically and economically attractive alternative to existing selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR) systems for new facilities, as well as in retrofit applications. Consequently, IGT and OMS are considering pursuing a long-term demonstration of this technology on an OMS MWC. The METHANE de-NOX approach was developed based on extensive full-scale MWC infurnace characterization and pilot-scale testing using simulated combustion products. The approach involves injection of natural gas, together with recirculated flue gases (for mixing), above the grate to provide oxygen-deficient combustion conditions that promote the destruction of NO{sub x} precursors, as well as NO{sub x}. Extensive pilot-scale testing, using both simulated combustion products and actual municipal waste (MW), showed that significant NO{sub x} reduction could be achieved. The results were used to define the key operating parameters for a field evaluation of the process. A full-scale METHANE de-NOX system was designed and retrofitted to a 100-ton/day Riley/Takuma mass burn system at the Olmsted County Waste-to-Energy facility for this field evaluation. The results of the field evaluation tests demonstrated the reduction of up to 60% in NO{sub x} emissions and up to 50% in CO emissions. Further benefits included a reduction of up to 50% in excess air requirements and boiler efficiency improvements. This paper describes the METHANE de-NOX technology and discusses the results to date of the IGT/OMS engineering and economic study. The focus is on the discussion of the benefits and drawbacks of this new technology in comparison with existing SNCR systems.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Abbasi, H. A.; Khinkis, M. J. & Scherrer, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991

Description: The objective of this investigation is to evaluate several novel copper-based binary oxides for their suitability as regenerable sorbents for hot gas cleanup application in the temperature range of 650{degree} to 850{degree}C (1200{degree}--1550{degree}F). To achieve this objective, several novel copper-based binary oxide sorbents will be prepared. Experimental tests will be conducted at ambient pressure to determine the stability, sulfidation capacity, regenerability, and sulfidation kinetics of the novel sorbents. Tests will also be conducted at high pressure for the determination of the sulfidation reactivity, regenerability, and durability of the sorbents. The attrition characteristics of the sorbents will also be determined.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Abbasian, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stabilization and/or regeneration of spent sorbents from coal gasification. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991

Description: The objective of this investigation is to determine the effects of SO{sub 2} partial pressure and reaction temperature on the conversion of sulfide containing solid wastes from coal gasifiers to stable and environmentally acceptable calcium-sulfate, while preventing the release of sulfur dioxide through undesirable side reactions during the stabilization step. An additional objective of this program is to investigate the use of the Spent Sorbent Regeneration Process (SSRP) to regenerate spent limestone, from a fluidized-bed gasifier with in-bed sulfur capture, for recycling to the gasifier. To achieve these objectives, selected samples of partially sulfided sorbents will be reacted with oxygen at a variety of operating conditions under sufficient SO{sub 2} partial pressure to prevent release of sulfur from the solids during stabilization that reduces the overall sorbent utilization. Partially sulfided limestone will also be regenerated with water to produce calcium hydroxide and release sulfur as H{sub 2}S. The regenerated sorbent will be dewatered, dried and pelletized. The reactivity of the regenerated sorbent toward H{sub 2}S will also be determined. During this quarter sulfidation tests were conducted in a quartz fluidized-bed reactor in which the selected calcium-based sorbents were first calcined and then were reacted with hydrogen sulfide at ambient pressure and 1650{degree}F. These tests were conducted with each sorbent in two particle sizes. Chemical analyses of the partially sulfided sorbents indicate that the extent of sulfidation was in the range of 40--50%. The partially sulfided material will be reacted with oxygen to determine the effects of temperature and SO{sub 2} partial pressure on the stabilization of the calcium sulfide in solid waste materials. 23 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Abbasian, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sulfur removal in advanced two stage pressurized fluidized bed combustion. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

Description: The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates and the extent of sulfation reactions involving partially sulfided calcium-based sorbents, and oxygen as well as sulfur dioxide, at operating conditions closely simulating those prevailing in the second stage (combustor) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors. In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, calcium sulfate is produced through the reactions between SO{sub 2} and calcium carbonate as well as the reaction between calcium sulfide and oxygen. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction involving SO{sub 2} and oxygen, calcium sulfide and calcium carbonate will be determined by conducting tests in a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer unit. The sulfate tests conducted during this quarter, focused on the determination of the rate of sulfation reaction involving partially sulfided half-calcined dolomite and oxygen. The test parameters included CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} concentrations, reaction temperature and pressure, as well as the sorbent particle size. The results obtained during this quarter suggest that the rate of sulfation reaction involving partially sulfided half-calcined dolomite and oxygen is very fast at temperatures above 850 C which rapidly increases with increasing temperature, achieving more than 85% conversion in less than a few minutes. The reaction appears to continue to completion, however, above 85% conversion, the rate of reaction appears to be low, requiring long residence time to reach complete conversion.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Abbasian, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sulfur removal in advanced two stage pressurized fluidized bed combustion. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

Description: The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates and the extent of sulfation reactions involving partially sulfided calcium-based sorbents, and oxygen as well as sulfur dioxide, at operating conditions closely simulating those prevailing in the second stage (combustor) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors (PFBC). In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, calcium sulfate is produced through the reactions between SO{sub 2} and calcium carbonate as well as the reaction between calcium sulfide and oxygen. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction involving SO{sub 2} and oxygen (gaseous reactant); and calcium sulfide and calcium carbonate (solid reactants), will be determined by conducting tests in a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (HPTGA) unit. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure; and O{sub 2} as well as SO{sub 2} partial pressures on the sulfation reactions rate will be determined. During this quarter, samples of the selected limestone and dolomite were sulfided in the fluidized-bed reactor. These tests were conducted in both calcining and non-calcining operating conditions to produce partially-sulfided sorbents containing calcium oxide and calcium carbonate, respectively. These samples which represent the carbonizer discharge material, will be used as the feed material in the sulfation tests to be conducted in the HPTGA unit during the next quarter.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Abbasian, J.; Hill, A. & Wangerow, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stabilization and/or regeneration of spent sorbents from coal gasification. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

Description: The objective of this investigation was to determine the effects of SO{sub 2} partial pressure and reaction temperature on the conversion of sulfide containing solid wastes from coal gasifiers to stable and environmentally acceptable calcium sulfate, while preventing the release of sulfur dioxide during the stabilization step. An additional objective of this study was to investigate the use of the Spent Sorbent Regeneration Process (SSRP) to regenerate spent Ca-based sorbent, from a fluidized-bed gasifier with in-bed sulfur capture, for recycling to the gasifier. To achieve these objectives, selected samples of partially sulfided sorbents were reacted with oxygen and SO{sub 2} at various operating conditions and the extent of CaS and CaO conversion were determined. Partially sulfided dolomite was used in sulfidation/regeneration over several cycles and the regeneration efficiency and sorbent reactivity were determined after each cycle. The results of the stabilization tests show that partially sulfided Ca-based sorbents (both limestone and dolomite) can be sulfated at temperatures above 1500{degrees}F resulting in high CaS conversion without release of SO{sub 2} producing environmentally acceptable material for disposal in landfills. The results also indicate that spent dolomite can be regenerated in the SSRP process, in successive cycles, with high regeneration efficiency without loss of reactivity toward hydrogen sulfide.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Abbasian, J.; Hill, A. H. & Wangerow, J. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stabilization of spent sorbents from coal gasification. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

Description: The objective of this investigation was to determine the rates of reactions involving partially sulfided dolomite and oxygen, which is needed for the design of the reactor system for the stabilization of sulfide-containing solid wastes from gasification of high sulfur coals. To achieve this objective, samples of partially sulfided dolomite were reacted with oxygen at a variety of operating conditions in a fluidized-bed reactor. The effect of external diffusion was eliminated by using small quantities of the sorbent and maintaining a high flow rate of the reactant gas. The reacted sorbents were analyzed to determine the extent of conversion as a function of operating variables including sorbent particle size, reaction temperature and pressure, and oxygen concentration. The results of sulfation tests indicate that the rate of reaction increases with increasing temperature, increasing oxygen partial pressure, and decreasing sorbent particle size. The rate of the sulfation reaction can be described by a diffuse interface model where both chemical reaction and intraparticle diffusion control the reaction rate. The kinetic model of the sulfation reaction was used to determine the requirements for the reactor system, i.e., reactor size and operating conditions, for successful stabilization of sulfide-containing solid wastes from gasification of high sulfur coals (with in-bed desulfurization using calcium based sorbents). The results indicate that the rate of reaction is fast enough to allow essentially complete sulfation in reactors with acceptable dimensions. The optimum sulfation temperature appears to be around 800{degrees}C for high pressure as well as atmospheric stabilization of the spent sorbents.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Abbasian, J.; Hill, A. H.; Rue, D. M. & Wangerow, J. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of novel copper-based sorbents for hot-gas cleanup. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

Description: The objective of this investigation was to evaluate several novel copper-based binary oxides for their suitability as regenerable sorbents for hot gas cleanup application in the temperature range of 650{degree} to 850{degree}C. To achieve this objective, several novel binary oxides of copper were systematically evaluated and ranked in terms of their high-temperature stability against reduction to metal, sulfidation reactivity, and regenerability. The sorbents studied included oxides of chromium, cerium, aluminum, magnesium, manganese, titanium, iron, and silicon. The results of initial testing indicated that mixed binary oxides of copper with chromium (CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and cerium (CuO{circle_dot}CeO{sub 2}) were the most promising sorbents for such high temperature gas cleanup applications. These two sorbents were further evaluated in cyclic sulfidation/regeneration tests in 10--15 cycles to determine the effect of operating conditions on their performance. The results of this investigation indicate that the two selected sorbents, copper-chromium and copper-cerium, are capable of removing H{sub 2}S from the hot fuel gas to very low levels (<10 ppmv) at temperatures as high as 850{degree}C with good sorbent regenerability in cyclic process. These sorbents should be further studied to achieve optimum sorbent composition for hot gas cleanup application.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Abbasian, J.; Hill, A. H.; Wangerow, J. R.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Bo, Luhong; Patel, C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of regenerable copper-based sorbents for hot gas cleanup. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995

Description: The overall objective of this study is to determine the effectiveness of the copper-chromite sorbent (developed in previous ICCI-funded projects) for longer duration application under optimum conditions in the temperature range of 550{degrees}-650{degrees}C to minimize sorbent reduction and degradation during the cyclic process. To achieve this objective, several formulations of copper chromite sorbents are prepared. These sorbent formulations are screened for their desulfurization and regeneration capability at predetermined temperatures and gas residence times. The durability of the best sorbent formulation identified in the screening tests is evaluated in ``long-term`` durability tests conducted at the optimum operating conditions. This includes testing the sorbent in pellet and granular forms in packed- and fluidized-bed reactors. During this quarter, twenty one copper chromite-based sorbent formulations were prepared. Two sorbent formulations that have acceptable crush strength, designated as CuCr-10 and CuCr-21, were tested over 5 and 6 cycles respectively. The results indicate that both sorbents are reactive toward H{sub 2}S at 650{degrees}C and that the reactivity of the sorbents are relatively constant over the first 5 to 6 cycles. The H{sub 2}S prebreakthrough concentrations were generally about 20 to 30 ppm, making them suitable for IGCC application.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Abbasian, J.; Slimane, R.B. & Hill, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stabilization of spent sorbents from coal-based power generation processes. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30,1995

Description: The overall objective of this study is to determine the effect of implementation of the new and more stringent EPA Protocol Test Method involving sulfide containing waste, on the suitability of the oxidized spent sorbents from gasification of of high sulfur coals for disposal in landfills, and to determine the optimum operating conditions in a ``final`` hydrolysis stage for conversion of the residual calcium sulfide in these wastes to materials that are suitable for disposal in landfills. An additional objective is to study the effect of ash on the regeneration and ash-sorbent separation steps in the Spent Sorbent Regeneration Process (SSRP). To achieve these objectives, a large set of oxidized samples of sulfided calcium-based sorbents (produced in earlier ICCI-funded programs) as well as oxidized samples of gasifier discharge (containing ash and spent sorbent) are tested according to the new EPA test protocol. Samples of the oxidized spent sorbents that do not pass the EPA procedure are reacted with water and carbon dioxide to convert the residual calcium sulfide to calcium carbonate. During this quarter, samples of oxidized sulfided calcium-based sorbents, including untreated calcium sulfide-containing feed materials, were analyzed using both weak acid and more stringent strong acid tests. Preliminary analysis of the H{sub 2}S leachability test results indicate that all samples (including those that were not oxidized) pass the EPA requirement of 500 mg H{sub 2}S per kg of solid waste. However, under the strong acid test procedure, samples containing more than 2.5% calcium sulfide fail the EPA requirement.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Abbassian, J. & Hill, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Functionally Graded Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

Description: One primary suspected cause of long-term performance degradation of solid oxide fuels (SOFCs) is the accumulation of chromium (Cr) species at or near the cathode/electrolyte interface due to reactive Cr molecules originating from Cr-containing components (such as the interconnect) in fuel cell stacks. To date, considerable efforts have been devoted to the characterization of cathodes exposed to Cr sources; however, little progress has been made because a detailed understanding of the chemistry and electrochemistry relevant to the Cr-poisoning processes is still lacking. This project applied multiple characterization methods - including various Raman spectroscopic techniques and various electrochemical performance measurement techniques - to elucidate and quantify the effect of Cr-related electrochemical degradation at the cathode/electrolyte interface. Using Raman microspectroscopy the identity and location of Cr contaminants (SrCrO{sub 4}, (Mn/Cr){sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel) have been observed in situ on an LSM cathode. These Cr contaminants were shown to form chemically (in the absence of current flowing through the cell) at temperatures as low as 625 C. While SrCrO{sub 4} and (Mn/Cr){sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel must preferentially form on LSM, since the LSM supplies the Sr and Mn cations necessary for these compounds, LSM was also shown to be an active site for the deposition of Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} for samples that also contained silver. In contrast, Pt and YSZ do not appear to be active for formation of Cr-containing phases. The work presented here supports the theory that Cr contamination is predominantly chemically-driven and that in order to minimize the effect, cathode materials should be chosen that are free of cations/elements that could preferentially react with chromium, including silver, strontium, and manganese.
Date: December 31, 2006
Creator: Abernathy, Harry & Liu, Meilin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fish Passage Through a Simulated Horizontal Bulb Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to"Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

Description: Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Both fish species were acclimated for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa; 1 atm) or 30 ft (191 kPa; 1.9 atm) of pressure in a hyperbaric chamber before exposure to a pressure scenario simulating passage through a horizontal bulb turbine. The simulation was as follows: gradual pressure increase to about 2 atm of pressure, followed by a sudden (0.4 second) decrease in pressure to either 0.7 or 0.95 atm, followed by gradual return to 1 atm (surface water pressure). Following the exposure, fish were held at surface ...
Date: July 31, 2003
Creator: Abernethy, Cary S.; Amidan, Brett G. & Cada, G. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pressure phase lines and enthalpies for the. cap alpha. -. beta. and. beta. -liquid transitions in beryllium

Description: The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the ..cap alpha..-..beta.. and ..beta..-liquid transition temperatures in Be was measured in a gas pressure system. Differential thermal analysis was used in the pressure range from 0.1 MPa to 0.7 GPa. For the ..cap alpha..-..beta.. transition, dT/dP = 43 +- 7 K/GPa; for the ..beta..-liquid transition, dT/dP = 35 +- 7 K/GPa. Although it is possible that large systematic errors may arise from experimental procedures, our results are seriously at odds with those of other investigators. Transition enthalpies for the ..cap alpha..-..beta.. and ..beta..-liquid transitions were 1.9 +- 0.2 and 2.2 +- 0.2 kcal/g.m., respectively, at a pressure of 0.1 MPa.
Date: October 31, 1984
Creator: Abey, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The role of catalyst precursor anions in coal gasification. Eighth quarterly report, [July--September 1993]

Description: This project investigates the roles of various aqueous soluble catalyst precursor anions, specifically acetate, chloride, nitrate, sulfate, and carbonate anions on the surface electrical properties of coal and seeks to understand the effects of these anions on the adsorption, dispersion and activities of calcium and potassium. The effects of the various anions on coal char gasification is currently under investigation. The influence of acetate, chloride and nitrate ions, when using the corresponding potassium compounds, are discussed in this report. The thermograms for the char preparation in nitrogen show that rapid devolatilization of moisture and other volatile materials occurs in the first 30 min. The rate of weight loss decreases significantly thereafter up to about 70 min. when char preparation was complete. Introduction of carbon dioxide after this time resulted in only a small amount of carbon gasification of the unloaded, demineralized coal. However, the chars containing the acetate, chloride or nitrate of potassium gave reactivities of 24.8, 30.4 or 24.3 %wt., respectively. The catalysts were ion-exchanged with the salt solutions and the corresponding potassium content were 2.9, 2.6 and 2.3 %wt. The higher reactivities of the catalyzed chars compared to the unloaded char correlates the high degree of demineralization and the resultant low catalytic activity by the inherent inorganic materials. It is observed that the potassium acetate and the potassium nitrate have similar reactivities, while the reactivity in the presence of KCl is higher. This finding contrasts some of the previous literature reports which show that oxygen-containing catalytic salts are more active catalysts due to the formation of carbon-oxygen-metal bonds which have been postulated as pre-requisites to carbon gasification.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Abotsi, G. M. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The role of catalyst precursor anions in coal gasification. Fourth quarterly report

Description: The aims of the proposed project are to enrich our understanding of the roles of various aqueous soluble catalyst precursor anions on the surface electrical properties of coal and to ascertain the influence of the surface charge on the adsorption, dispersion, and activities of calcium and potassium. These goals will be achieved by impregnating a demineralized North Dakota lignite (PSOC 1482) with calcium or potassium catalyst precursors containing acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}), chloride (CI{sup {minus}}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), and carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) anions. In the past quarter, the effects of (CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}), CI{sup {minus}}, (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}), (CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) or (CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) on the surface charge properties of the coal has been initiated using the calcium salts of these anions. Like the corresponding potassium compounds investigated previously, increasing anion concentrations produce less negative charge on the coal surface through the interaction of calcium ions with the surface. This was confirmed by metal adsorption and chemical analysis of the filtered coal particles. The extent of metal adsorption was strongly dependent on the catalyst precursor. For potassium, maximum metal uptake from solution was obtained using potassium carbonate, followed by potassium acetate, while the lowest metal loadings were obtained when using the chloride, nitrate or the sulfate of potassium. The adsorption data are generally in agreement with the zeta potential results and suggest electrostatic attraction between the metal cation and the anionic coal surface. Fourier transform infrared studies are in progress to elucidate the coal-catalyst interactions.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Abotsi, G. M. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department