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1-1/2-Loop Semiscale Isothermal Test Program: Program and System Description in Support of Experiment Data Reports.

Description: The isothermal test series is part of the Semiscale Blowdown and Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) Project conducted by Aerojet Nuclear Company for the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. The test series consisted of ten blowdown tests and five hot-wall tests with emphasis on emergency core coolant delivery. The blowdown tests were conducted to investigate the effects of lower plenum geometry, heat transfer configuration, ECC injection location, downcomer gap size, and break size.
Date: February 1, 1974
Creator: Aerojet Nuclear Company
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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1.5-GeV FFAG Accelerator for the AGS Facility

Description: N/A
Date: February 1, 2004
Creator: Ruggiero, A. G.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Courant, E.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N. & Zhang, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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1/6TH SCALE STRIP EFFLUENT FEED TANK-MIXING RESULTS USING MCU SOLVENT

Description: The purpose of this task was to determine if mixing was an issue for the entrainment and dispersion of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) solvent in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Strip Effluent Feed Tank (SEFT). The MCU strip effluent stream containing the Cs removed during salt processing will be transferred to the DWPF for immobilization in HLW glass. In lab-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing, mixing of the solvent in the dilute nitric acid solution proved problematic, and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to perform scaled SEFT mixing tests to evaluate whether the problem was symptomatic of the lab-scale set-up or of the solvent. The solvent levels tested were 228 and 235 ppm, which represented levels near the estimated DWPF solvent limit of 239 ppm in 0.001M HNO{sub 3} solution. The 239 ppm limit was calculated by Norato in X-CLC-S-00141. The general approach for the mixing investigation was to: (1) Investigate the use of fluorescent dyes to aid in observing the mixing behavior. Evaluate and compare the physical properties of the fluorescent dyed MCU solvents to the baseline Oak Ridge CSSX solvent. Based on the data, use the dyed MCU solvent that best approximates the physical properties. (2) Use approximately a 1/6th linear scale of the SEFT to replicate the internal configuration for DWPF mixing. (3) Determine agitator speed(s) for scaled testing based on the DWPF SEFT mixing speed. (4) Perform mixing tests using the 1/6th SEFT and determine any mixing issues (entrainment/dispersion, accumulation, adhesion) through visual observations and by pulling samples to assess uniformity. The mixing tests used MCU solvent fabricated at SRNL blended with Risk Reactor DFSB-K43 fluorescent dye. This dyed SRNL MCU solvent had equivalent physical properties important to mixing as compared to the Oak Ridge baseline solvent, …
Date: February 1, 2006
Creator: Hansen, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of cholera toxin B subunit pentamer: Choleragenoid

Description: Cholera toxin, a heterohexameric AB{sub 5} enterotoxin released by Vibrio cholera, induces a profuse secretory diarrhea in susceptible hosts. Choleragenoid, the B subunit pentamer of cholera toxin, directs the enzymatic A subunit to its target by binding to GM{sub 1} gangliosides exposed on the luminal surface of intestinal epithelial cells. We have solved the crystal structure of choleragenoid at 2.3 {Angstrom} resolution by combining single isomorphous replacement with non-crystallographic symmetry averaging. The structure of the B subunits, and their pentameric arrangement, closely resembles that reported for the intact holotoxin (choleragen), the heat-labile enterotoxin from E. coli, and for a choleragenoid-GM{sub 1} pentasaccharide complex. In the absence of the A subunit the central cavity of the B pentamer is a highly solvated channel. The binding of the A subunit or the receptor pentasaccharide to choleragenoid has only a modest effect on the local stereochemistry and does not perceptibly alter the subunit interface.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Zhang, Rong-Guang; Westbrook, M. L.; Maulik, P. R.; Reed, R. A.; Shipley, G.; Westbrook, E. M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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3-D Finite Element Analyses of the Egan Cavern Field

Description: Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed for the two gas-filled storage caverns at the Egan field, Jennings dome, Louisiana. The effects of cavern enlargement on surface subsidence, storage loss, and cavern stability were investigated. The finite element model simulated the leaching of caverns to 6 and 8 billion cubic feet (BCF) and examined their performance at various operating conditions. Operating pressures varied from 0.15 psi/ft to 0.9 psi/ft at the bottom of the lowest cemented casing. The analysis also examined the stability of the web or pillar of salt between the caverns under differential pressure loadings. The 50-year simulations were performed using JAC3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasistatic solids. A damage criterion based on onset of dilatancy was used to evaluate cavern instability. Dilation results from the development of microfractures in salt and, hence, potential increases in permeability onset occurs well before large scale failure. The analyses predicted stable caverns throughout the 50-year period for the range of pressures investigated. Some localized salt damage was predicted near the bottom walls of the caverns if the caverns are operated at minimum pressure for long periods of time. Volumetric cavern closures over time due to creep were moderate to excessive depending on the salt creep properties and operating pressures. However, subsidence above the cavern field was small and should pose no problem, to surface facilities.
Date: February 1, 1999
Creator: Klamerus, E.W. & Ehgartner, B.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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3-D slug flow heat transfer analysis of coupled coolant cells in finite LMFBR bundles

Description: A three-dimensional single region slug flow heat transfer analysis for finite LMFBR rod bundles using a classical analytical solution method has been performed. According to the isolated single cell analysis, the results show that the peripheral clad temperature variation as well as the thermal entrance length are strongly dependent upon the degree of irregularity displayed by various coolant geometries. Since under the present LMFBR conditions, fully-developed temperature fields may hardly be established in such characteristic rod bundle regions, a 3-D heat transfer analysis seems to be mandatory. This implies that the results of fully developed heat transfer analyses are by far too conservative.
Date: February 1, 1978
Creator: Wong, C.N. & Wolf, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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T-3 electron-beam-excited laser system

Description: A laser system specifically designed to study the kinetics of electron-beam driven systems is described. Details of the system are given along with measurements of the electron-beam uniformity and deposition in the laser medium. Some HF laser results obtained with this system are also given.
Date: February 1, 1981
Creator: Klein, R. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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4 K to 20 K rotational-cooling magnetic refrigerator capable of 1-mW to >1-W operation

Description: The low-temperature, magnetic entropy of certain single-crystal paramagnetic materials, such as DyPO/sub 4/, changes dramatically as the crystal rotates in a magnetic field. A new magnetic refrigerator design based on the anisotropic nature of such materials is presented. The key advantages of the rotational-cooling concept are (1) a single, rotary motion is required, (2) magnetic field shaping is not a problem because the entire working material is in a constant field, and (3) the refrigerator can be smaller than comparable magnetic refrigerators because the working material is entirely inside the magnet at all times. The main disadvantage of the rotational-cooling concept is that small-dimension single crystals are required.
Date: February 1, 1980
Creator: Barclay, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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10 kW SOFC POWER SYSTEM COMMERCIALIZATION

Description: The program is organized into three developmental periods. In Phase 1 the team will develop and demonstrate a proof-of-concept prototype design and develop a manufacturing plan to substantiate potential producibility at a target cost level of $800/kW factory manufacturing cost. Phase 2 will further develop the design and reduce the manufacturing cost to a level of $600 kW. Depending on an assessment of the maturity of the technology at the end of Phase 1, Phase 2 may be structured and supplemented to provide a limited production capability. Finally, in Phase 3, a full Value Package Introduction (VPI) Program will be integrated into the SECA program to develop a mass-producible design at a factory cost of $400/kW with full cross-functional support for unrestricted commercial sales. The path to market for new technology products in the Cummins system involves two processes. The first is called Product Preceding Technology, or PPT. The PPT process provides a methodology for exploring potentially attractive technologies and developing them to the point that they can be reliably scheduled into a new product development program with a manageable risk to the product introduction schedule or product quality. Once a technology has passed the PPT gate, it is available to be incorporated into a Value Package Introduction (VPI) Program. VPI is the process that coordinates the cross-functional development of a fully supported product. The VPI Program is designed to synchronize efforts in engineering, supply, manufacturing, marketing, finance, and product support areas in such a way that the product, when introduced to the market, represents the maximum value to the customer.
Date: February 1, 2004
Creator: Norrick, Dan; Palmer, Brad; Vesely, Charles; Barringer, Eric; DeBellis, Cris; Goettler, Rich et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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10 kW SOFC Power System Commercialization

Description: Cummins Power Generation (CPG) as the prime contractor and SOFCo-EFS Holdings LLC (SOFCo), as their subcontractor, teamed under the Solid-state Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program to develop 3-10kW solid oxide fuel cell systems for use in recreational vehicles, commercial work trucks and stand-by telecommunications applications. The program goal is demonstration of power systems that meet commercial performance requirements and can be produced in volume at a cost of $400/kW. This report summarizes the team's activities during the seventh six-month period (July-December 2005) of the four-year Phase I effort. While there has been significant progress in the development of the SOFC subsystems that can support meeting the program Phase 1 goals, the SOFCo ceramic stack technology has progressed significantly slower than plan and CPG consider it unlikely that the systemic problems encountered will be overcome in the near term. SOFCo has struggled with a series of problems associated with inconsistent manufacturing, inadequate cell performance, and the achievement of consistent, durable, low resistance inter-cell connections with reduced or no precious materials. A myriad of factors have contributed to these problems, but the fact remains that progress has not kept pace with the SECA program. A contributing factor in SOFCo's technical difficulties is attributed to their significantly below plan industry cost share spending over the last four years. This has resulted in a much smaller SOFC stack development program, has contributed to SOFCo not being able to aggressively resolve core issues, and clouds their ability to continue into a commercialization phase. In view of this situation, CPG has conducted an independent assessment of the state-of-the-art in planar SOFC's stacks and have concluded that alternative technology exists offering the specific performance, durability, and low cost needed to meet the SECA objectives. We have further concluded that there is insufficient evidence to reliably predict that …
Date: February 1, 2006
Creator: Norrick, Dan; Palmer, Brad; Vesely, Charles; Barringer, Eric; Budge, John; DeBellis, Cris et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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26.7 Mhz Cavity Mechanical Tuner Requirements

Description: The Report is a description of Project about 26.7 Mhz Cavity Mechanical Tuner Requirements.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Rose, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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180 MW demonstration of advanced tangentially-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Final report

Description: This report provides the key findings of the Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration project at Gulf Power`s Lansing Smith Unit No. 2 and the implications for other tangentially-fired boilers. L. Smith Unit No. 2 is a 180 MW tangentially-fired boiler burning Eastern Bituminous coal, which was retrofitted with Asea Brown Boveri/Combustion Engineering Services` (ABB/CE) LNCFS I, II, and III technologies. An extensive test program was carried-out with US Department of Energy, Southern Company and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) funding. The LNCFS I, II, and III achieved 37 percent, 37 percent, and 45 percent average long-term NO{sub x} emission reduction at full load, respectively (see following table). Similar NO{sub x} reduction was achieved within the control range (100--200 MW). However, below the control point (100 MW), NO{sub x} emissions with the LNCFS technologies increased significantly, reaching pre-retrofit levels at 70 MW. Short-term testing proved that low load NO{sub x} emissions could be reduced further by using lower excess O{sub 2} and burner tilt, but with adversed impacts on unit performance, such as lower steam outlet temperatures and, potentially, higher CO emissions and LOI.
Date: February 1, 1994
Creator: Tavoulareas, E. S.; Hardman, R.; Eskinazi, D. & Smith, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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200-BP-1 Prototype Hanford Barrier Annual Monitoring Report for Fiscal Years 2005 Through 2007

Description: A prototype Hanford barrier was deployed over the 216-B-57 Crib at the Hanford Site in 1994 to prevent percolation through the underlying waste and to minimize spreading of buried contaminants. This barrier is being monitored to evaluate physical and hydrologic performance at the field scale. This report summarizes data collected during the period FY 2005 through FY 2007. In FY 2007, monitoring of the prototype Hanford barrier focused on barrier stability, vegetative cover, evidence of plant and animal intrusion, and the main components of the water balance, including precipitation, runoff, storage, drainage, and deep percolation. Owing to a hiatus in funding in FY 2005 through 2006, data collected were limited to automated measurements of the water-balance components. For the reporting period (October 2004 through September 2007) precipitation amount and distribution were close to normal. The cumulative amount of water received from October 1994 through September 2007 was 3043.45 mm on the northern half of the barrier, which is the formerly irrigated treatment, and 2370.58 mm on the southern, non-irrigated treatments. Water storage continued to show a cyclic pattern, increasing in the winter and declining in the spring and summer to a lower limit of around 100 mm in response to evapotranspiration. The 600-mm design storage has never been exceeded. For the reporting period, the total drainage from the soil-covered plots ranged from near zero amounts under the soil-covered plots to almost 20 mm under the side slopes. Over the 13-yr monitoring period, side slope drainage accounted for about 20 percent of total precipitation while the soil-covered plots account for only 0.12 mm total. Above-asphalt and below-asphalt moisture measurements show no evidence of deep percolation of water. Topographic surveys show the barrier and protective side slopes to be stable. Plant surveys show a relatively high coverage of native plants still persists …
Date: February 1, 2008
Creator: Ward, Andy L.; Link, Steven O.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Draper, Kathryn E. & Clayton, Ray E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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200 Steamflood Demonstration Project. Fourth annual report, June 1979-June 1980

Description: The 200 Sand Steamflood Demonstration Project is testing an enhanced steamflooding technique in the Midway-Sunset Field, Kern County, California. This project was initiated to demonstrate the operational, recovery, and economic aspects of steamflooding a typical heavy oil reservoir which had unfavorable response to cyclic steam stimulation. A pilot test was conducted in four (4) 2.35 acre inverted seven-spot steam drive patterns, which were not fully developed with producers. As a result of the response shown by the pilot, in April 1980, work began to expand the pilot area to a total of fourteen (14) fully developed 2.35 acre inverted seven-spot patterns. Expansion to a full-scale steamflood test will consist of drilling and completing 30 producing wells and 10 steam injection wells. The reservoir contains approximately 50 million barrels of oil-in-place in a structure that lies between 400 and 700 feet in depth.
Date: February 1, 1981
Creator: Alford, W O
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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200-UP-2 Operable Unit technical baseline report

Description: This report is prepared in support of the development of a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit by EBASCO Environmental, Incorporated. It provides a technical baseline of the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit and results from an environmental investigation undertaken by the Technical Baseline Section of the Environmental Engineering Group, Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Technical Baseline Report is based on review and evaluation of numerous Hanford Site current and historical reports, Hanford Site drawings and photographs and is supplemented with Hanford Site inspections and employee interviews. No field investigations or sampling were conducted. Each waste site in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is described separately. Close relationships between waste units, such as overflow from one to another, are also discussed. The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit consists of liquid-waste disposal sites in the vicinity of, and related to, U Plant operations in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The U Plant'' refers to the 221-U Process Canyon Building, a chemical separations facility constructed during World War 2. It also includes the Uranium Oxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant, which was constructed at the same time and, like the 221-U Process Canyon Building, was later converted for other missions. Waste sites in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit are associated with the U Plant Uranium Metal Recovery Program mission that occurred between 1952 and 1958 and the UO{sub 3} Plant's ongoing uranium oxide mission and include one or more cribs, reverse wells, french drains, septic tanks and drain fields, trenches, catch tanks, settling tanks, diversion boxes, waste vaults, and the lines and encasements that connect them. 11 refs., 1 tab.
Date: February 1, 1991
Creator: Deford, D. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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216-U-10 Pond and 216-Z-19 Ditch characterization studies

Description: The chemical, reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site has generated large volumes of radioactive liquid effluents. The majority of these effluents have been used strictly for cooling or other supportive functions and have been discharged to ditches and ponds. The 216-U-10 Pond and 216-Z-19 Ditch are two such disposal facilities. These facilities are components of an integrated system of ditches, ponds, and overflow facilities collectively referred to as the U-Pond disposal system. The U-Pond system has been used since 1943 and has received a large variety of radioisotopes from several sources. This study covered tho major aspects of the environment, including wind resuspension, biological uptake and transport, geologic distribution in surface and subsurface sediments, and ground-water impacts. The long-term use of U-Pond and the Z-19 Ditch has resulted in the localized accumulation of transuranic and fission product inventories as a result of sorption and filtration of particulates onto the uppermost sediments.
Date: February 1, 1994
Creator: Last, G. V.; Duncan, D. W.; Graham, M. J.; Hall, M. D.; Hall, V. W.; Landeen, D. S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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225-B ion exchange piping design documentation

Description: This document describes the interface between the planned permanent ion exchange piping system and the planned portable ion exchange system. This is part of the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). In order to decouple this WESF from B-Plant and to improve recovery from a capsule leak, contaminated pool cell water will be recirculated through a portable ion exchange resin system.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Prather, M. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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250 MW single train CFB cogeneration facility. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994

Description: This Technical Progress Report (Draft) is submitted pursuant to the Terms and Conditions of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC27403 between the Department of Energy (Morgantown Energy Technology Center) and York County Energy Partners, L.P. a wholly owned project company of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. covering the period from January 1994 to the present for the York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration Project. The Technical Progress Report summarizes the work performed during the most recent year of the Cooperative Agreement including technical and scientific results.
Date: February 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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300 Area, January 22--January 28

Description: Progress is reported on the topics of extrusion and canning. The information on canning is broken down into: Production test 313-74-M, studies of aluminium cans, selection of surface rejection standards, thorium, and the effect of high and low tin in bronze on tin carry-over to canning bath.
Date: February 1, 1946
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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300-FF-1 remedial design report/remedial action work plan

Description: The 300 Area has been divided into three operable units 300-FF-1, 300-FF-2, and 300-FF-5 all of which are in various stages of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) process. The 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the subject of this report, includes liquid waste disposal sites, landfills, and a burial ground. This Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan (RDR/RAWP) provides a summary description of each waste site included in the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit, the basis for remedial actions to be taken, and the remedial action approach and management process for implementing these actions. The remedial action approach and management sections provide a description of the remedial action process description, the project schedule, the project team, required planning documentation, the remedial action change process, the process for verifying attainment of the remedial action goals, and the required CERCLA and RCRA closeout documentation. Appendix A provides additional details on each waste site. In addition to remediation of the waste sites, waste generated during the remedial investigation/feasibility study portions of the project will also be disposed at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). Appendix B provides a summary of the modeling performed in the 300-FF-1 Phase 3 FS and a description of the modeling effort to be used to show attainment of the remedial action goals. Appendix C provides the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for all sampling and field-screening activities performed during remediation and for verification of attainment with the remedial action goals. Appendix D provides the public involvement plan, prepared to ensure information is provided to the public during remedial design and remedial action processes.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Gustafson, F.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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309 Facility deactivation and decommisioning Criteria Completion Check Lists

Description: To facilitate and track completion of the 309 Facility turnover criteria completion an Applicability Matrix and Criteria Completion Check Lists were prepared. The applicability matrix documents the required turnover criteria for a given area in the facility or scope of work. The applicable criteria is selected for 16 different areas. For each area a completion checklist is provided to document completion of a requirement by WHC and the Environmental Restoration Contractor.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Cornwell, B.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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325-B FACILITY

Description: Due to the continuing high air sample results over the past six months, a thorough review of conditions and procedures was felt necessary for 325-B facility. A complete survey of the facility was made, looking for possible or definite problems. A discussion about procedures and conditions was held with all Radiation Monitoring personnel involved with the facility. The following items we felt needed attention to improve the working environment for the personnel in the facility. 1. Recommend glovebox be decontaminated and gloves changed to reduce dose rates. 2. Repair fume hood for proper airflow. 3. Move slurp jug inside fume hood and provide lead shielding. 4. Change storage of samples outside of cells to reduce dose rates. 5. Recommend contaminated waste from cells be bagged when removed through transfer tray. 6. Recommend fume hoods be installed at cell transfer trays. During a recent house cleaning, personnel in 325-B took action to correct items number 1 through 5, which leaves item number 6 to be considered. The need for fume hoods is based on high air sample results. These fume hoods would be very helpful in the unpackaging of contaminated samples. The removal of samples from the cell requires good air flow due to contamination levels.
Date: February 1, 1971
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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340 vault K1 exhaust system HEPA filter evaluation

Description: A previous evaluation documented in report WHC-SD-GN-RPT-30005, Rev. 0, titled ``Evaluation on Self-Contained High Efficiency Particulate Filters,`` revealed that the SCHEPA filters do not have required documentation to be in compliance with the design, testing, and fabrication standards required in ASME N-509, ASME N-510, and MIL-F-51068. These standards are required by DOE Order 6430.IA. Without this documentation, filter adequacy cannot be verified. The existing SCHEPA filters can be removed and replaced with new filters and filter housing which meet current codes and standards.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Arndt, T.E., Fluor Daniel Hanford
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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