Search Results

Adoption of Wearable Devices by Older Adults

Description: This dissertation is organized in a traditional format while including three essays that address specific research questions. Essay 1 examined the relationship between physical activity and community engagement and their effect on mental well-being among older men and women. Data from National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) from 2018 to 2020 were explored and the posited relationships were tested. This essay provides empirical support that older adults who are reasonably active and involved in the community have greater mental well-being than those who isolate themselves. Essay 2 provides insight into older adults' motivation to improve their physical activity through the use of a fitness tracker. The key finding from this study is that wearables, especially fitness trackers, can significantly facilitate increased physical activity. Essay 3 is a mixed-methods study to understand older adults' perception of the usefulness of fitness trackers and interaction with such devices. Findings suggest that to increase the adoption of fitness trackers among older adults, makers could improve the esthetics and quality of the wristband in addition to the battery life of the tracker.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2027.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Enamela, Pranathy
Partner: UNT Libraries

Advanced Distributed Optimization and Control Algorithms: Theory and Applications

Description: Networked multi-agent systems have attracted lots of researchers to develop algorithms, techniques, and applications.A multi-agent networked system consists of more than one subsystem (agent) to cooperately solve a global problem with only local computations and communications in a fully distributed manner. These networked systems have been investigated in various different areas including signal processing, control system, and machine learning. We can see massive applications using networked systems in reality, for example, persistent surveillance, healthcare, factory manufacturing, data mining, machine learning, power system, transportation system, and many other areas. Considering the nature of those mentioned applications, traditional centralized control and optimization algorithms which require both higher communication and computational capacities are not suitable. Additionally, compared to distributed control and optimization approaches, centralized control, and optimization algorithms cannot be scaled into systems with a large number of agents, or guarantee performance and security. All of the limitations of centralized control and optimization algorithms motivate us to investigate and develop new distributed control and optimization algorithms in networked systems. Moreover, convergence rate and analysis are crucial in control and optimization literature, which motivates us to investigate how to analyze and accerlate the convergence of distributed optimization algorithms.
This item is restricted from view until December 1, 2022.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Zhang, Shengjun
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Analysis of Compressive Sensing and the Electrocardiogram

Description: As technology has advanced, data has become more and more important. The more breakthroughs are achieved, the more data is needed to support them. As a result, more storage is required in the system's memory. Compression is therefore required. Before it can be stored, the data must be compressed. To ensure that information is not lost, efficient compression is necessary. This also makes sure that there is no redundancy in the data that is being kept and stored. Compressive sensing has emerged as a new field of compression thanks to developments in sparse optimization. Rather than relying just on compression and sensing formulations, the theory blends the two. The objective of this thesis is to analyze the concept of compressive sensing and to study several reconstruction algorithms. Additionally, a few of the algorithms were put into practice. This thesis also included a model of the ECG, which is vital in determining the health of the heart. For the most part, the ECG is utilized to diagnose heart illness, and a modified synthetic ECG can be used to mimic some of these arrhythmias.
This item is restricted from view until December 1, 2022.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Molugu, Shravan
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Artificial Intelligence at Home: Alexa, Are You Influencing My Family?

Description: The purpose of this research is to measure the social shifts that take place in a home where artificial intelligent (AI) devices like Echo Dot and Google Home are fully integrated into their everyday life. Research is currently limited, being that the widespread use of these devices is roughly seven years old. Three main outcomes of this study were related to how often Alexa is being used in homes to solve everyday problems, the lack of overall privacy and security concerns users had, and the level of integration into the home as a member of the family. Some limitations and challenges are my ability to compare the households before and after installing these devices in the home; pinpointing when and where the device is used (i.e., room placement); collecting data on whether the device is used often or sparingly; and the depth of interactions these families actually have with the device on a whole. The broader implications behind the increased integration of AI devices is centered around health, labor, social inequality and ethics.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Ra'oof, Jameelah
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Assessing New Dimensions of an Organization's Learning Culture

Description: Work-based and employee-driven informal learning, training and development have been increasing in importance in the last few decades. Concurrently, organizations seek to measure the extent to which they develop a culture and structure that supports individual learning and organizational learning. This study develops and validates a scale that can measure the extent to which an organization is perceived to provide online learning that is personalized for its employees and perceived to recognize skills and competencies acquired through non-degree and other pathways. This research can provide organizations with the ability to measure and benchmark attributes of their learning culture that are important to work-based and lifelong learning as well as talent recruitment and management.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Scott, Jennifer Lyne
Partner: UNT Libraries

Attaining Team Psychological Safety to Unlock the Potential of Diverse Teams

Description: Team psychological safety fosters interpersonal risk-taking and constructive debate. Yet, how psychological safety develops in diverse teams needs to be explained. I apply collective regulatory lenses to shed light on how collective prevention focus (status quo) and collective promotion focus (growth) uniquely affect team psychological safety. I believe promotion focus makes it easier to attain psychological safety, while prevention focus makes it harder. Under a collective promotion lens, teams seek growth. Under a collective prevention lens, teams desire protection and not making things any worse. A pilot study of 76 students in 17 student project teams provided initial support for individual relationships in my model. In Study 2, an experiment, I manipulated team regulatory foci in three tasks (building towers, selling a house, negotiating a salary). I did not find significant mean group differences in psychological safety between promotion (n = 17) and prevention (n = 15) teams; yet, promotion teams experienced greater team viability in the final activity. In Study 3, I employed an experimental vignette method that suggested leadership conditions (e.g., leader humility vs transactional leadership) created differences in regulatory foci and subsequent differences in psychological safety with 343 working professionals in 7 scenarios.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2023.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Chen, Victor H.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Autonomic Zero Trust Framework for Network Protection

Description: With the technological improvements, the number of Internet connected devices is increasing tremendously. We also observe an increase in cyberattacks since the attackers want to use all these interconnected devices for malicious intention. Even though there exist many proactive security solutions, it is not practical to run all the security solutions on them as they have limited computational resources and even battery operated. As an alternative, Zero Trust Architecture (ZTA) has become popular is because it defines boundaries and requires to monitor all events, configurations, and connections and evaluate them to enforce rejecting by default and accepting only if they are known and accepted as well as applies a continuous trust evaluation. In addition, we need to be able to respond as quickly as possible, which cannot be managed by human interaction but through autonomous computing paradigm. Therefore, in this work, we propose a framework that would implement ZTA using autonomous computing paradigm. The proposed solution, Autonomic ZTA Management Engine (AZME) framework, focusing on enforcing ZTA on network, uses a set of sensors to monitor a network, a set of user-defined policies to define which actions to be taken (through controller). We have implemented a Python prototype as a proof-of-concept that checks network packets and enforce ZTA by checking the individual source and destination based on the given policies and continuously evaluate the trust of connections. If an unaccepted connection is made, it can block the connection by creating firewall rule at runtime.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2023.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Durflinger, James
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Awareness, Inclusivity, and Action in Western Historical Museums

Description: Dominant narratives in western historical museums often evoke a nostalgia for a Western Frontier that did not actually exist in the United States. Many Western historical museums, in particular, preserve nostalgia of an imagined Western Frontier through narratives of white masculine heroism, by featuring objects and artifacts symbolizing American exceptionalism and conquest, and by developing a sensory experience in exhibits to recreate an idealized time in history. As our understandings of history evolve, it is increasingly more evident that there is a significant need for Western historical museums as knowledge producers to shift narratives in exhibits from the dominant white-settler perspective. An integration of different value systems, cultures, practices, and beliefs in exhibits is possible by incorporating a diversity of thought in the frameworks used to interpret history, through the inclusion of diverse stories, and through creating accessible exhibits to reach a broader public audience.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Brown, Sonia Renee
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Band Theory and Beyond: Applications of Quantum Algorithms for Quantum Chemistry

Description: In the past two decades, myriad algorithms to elucidate the characteristics and dynamics of molecular systems have been developed for quantum computers. In this dissertation, we explore how these algorithms can be adapted to other fields, both to closely related subjects such as materials science, and more surprising subjects such as information theory. Special emphasis is placed on the Variational Quantum Eigensolver algorithm adapted to solve band structures of a periodic system; three distinct implementations are developed, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. We also see how unitary quantum circuits designed to model individual electron excitations within a molecule can be modified to prepare a quantum states strictly orthogonal to a space of known states, an important component to solve problems in thermodynamics and spectroscopy. Finally, we see how the core behavior in several quantum algorithms originally developed for quantum chemistry can be adapted to implement compressive sensing, a protocol in information theory for extrapolating large amounts of information from relatively few measurements. This body of work demonstrates that quantum algorithms developed to study molecules have immense interdisciplinary uses in fields as varied as materials science and information theory.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Sherbert, Kyle Matthew
Partner: UNT Libraries

"Before This Memory Will Make Sense": Essays

Description: This work contains a series of essays examining childhood trauma through the lens and experience of the author.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2027.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Brandt Jr., John
Partner: UNT Libraries

CFD Study of Ship Hydrodynamics in Calm Water with Shear Current and in Designed Wave Trails

Description: Although the capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in modeling ship hydrodynamics is well explored in many studies, they still have two main limitations. First, those studies ignore the effect of non-uniform shear current which exists in realistic situation. Second, the focus of most studies was laid more on the seakeeping/maneuvering performance and less attention was paid to survivability of ships due to extreme ship response events in waves, which are considered rare events but influential. In this thesis, we explore the capability of CFD in those two areas. In the first part of the thesis, the hydrodynamic performance of KCS in the presence of a non-uniform shear current is investigated for the first time using high-fidelity CFD simulations. Various shear current conditions with different directions were considered and results were compared with the ones with no shear current. The second part of the thesis focuses on study of rare events of ship responses by development of extreme response conditioning techniques to design the wave trail. Two conditioned techniques based on Gaussian and non-Gaussian processes are considered.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2024.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Phan, Khang Minh
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Characterization and Chemical Analysis of Fundamental Components for Lead Acid Batteries

Description: Although markets for alternative batteries, such as Li-ion, are growing, Pb-alloy batteries still dominate the market due to their low cost and good functionality. Even though these Pb-alloy batteries have been around since their discovery in 1859, little research involving advanced characterization techniques, such as synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD) and transmission electron diffraction (TEM) have been performed on Pb-alloys and sulfation, a failure mode in lead acid batteries, with regards to thermally- and electrochemically-induced changes at the atomic and microstructural scale. Therefore, there is a need to close this scientific gap between research and the application of Pb-alloy battery material. The main objectives of this research are to examine the process of sulfation and its growth mechanisms as well as to study the effects of minor alloying additions in Pb-alloy material. In the first case, nucleation and growth mechanisms of PbSO4 nano- and micro-particles in various solutions are examined using TEM to potentially reduce or control the buildup of PbSO4 on battery electrodes over time. The time dependency of particle morphology was observed using various reaction conditions. This insight can provide avenues to reduce unwanted buildup of PbSO4 on battery electrodes over time which can extend battery life and performance. This is followed by in situ SR-XRD studies of the grain growth and phase evolution associated with adding minor alloying elements, a varying combination of Sb, As, Ca, Sn, Al, In, Ba, and Bi, in Pb-alloy grid material during isothermal holds and thermal cycling. Additionally, sulfation studies were performed in H2SO4 solutions, and the Pb-alloys underwent cyclic voltammetry. Through this research, knowledge of elemental effects on Pb-alloys and corresponding sulfation effects provide insight into ways to extended the life and increase the efficiency of Pb-alloy batteries.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Wall, Michael T
Partner: UNT Libraries

Chinese Art Songs in the 1930s: An Analysis and Interpretive Guide of Six Selected Songs by Huang Zi (1904-1938)

Description: Chinese art songs—which are derived from over four thousand years of Chinese culture and combine unique Chinese literary and musical flavors with Western compositional techniques—remain largely unknown in the Western world. Chinese art song, a treasure of a genre, deserves more attention from Western singers and scholars. With a population of 1.41 billion, China has the largest potential market for bel canto singing. Not only will studying Chinese art songs enrich a singer's worldview and repertoire choices, doing so will also be advantageous when singing internationally. In order to assist non-Chinese-speaking singers overcome the difficult language barrier that often prevents them from studying Chinese art songs, I have chosen six songs by the renowned early twentieth century Chinese composer, Huang Zi (1904–1938) to analyze. Although he remains virtually unknown in the Western scholarly world, Huang's Chinese art songs, which include both ancient and contemporary Chinese poetry as well as Chinese and Western musical characteristics, are representative of this genre. By analyzing the poetry and musical settings of six Chinese art songs by Huang Zi, providing pronunciation instructions for Mandarin Chinese, word-for-word and poetic translations, practical International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) transcriptions from the Pinyin system, and creating an interpretive guide of these songs, this project aims to help singers worldwide to prepare and perform Chinese art songs in a more expressive and authentic way. Taking this project as the first step, singers and scholars worldwide will be able to study and research more Chinese art songs and explore a new artistic world.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2023.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Peng, Bin
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Collegiate Student-Athletes' Psychological Distress and Counseling Use during COVID-19

Description: The onset of COVID-19 and cancellation of collegiate sports may have exacerbated student-athletes' psychological distress. Within a national sample of collegiate student-athletes (N = 5755; 66.7% women; 72.3% White), I determined how gender, race, and sport season related to rates of depression, stress, and counseling use. I used a cross-sectional methodology and collected data in April/May 2020. Overall, 26.5% (n = 1526) and 10.6% (n = 612) of the collegiate student-athletes endorsed clinical and high levels for depression and stress, respectively; 25.1% (n = 1443) and 69.7% (n = 4014) reported subclinical and moderate levels of depression and stress, respectively. Few student-athletes reported counseling use before (17.1%) or after (2.3%) the onset of COVID-19; those who reportedly used services endorsed higher levels of depression and stress than those who did not. Female student-athletes reported higher rates of depression, stress, and counseling use than male student-athletes. There were no race or sport season effects. Student-athletes who competed in spring sports endorsed higher levels of counseling use than student-athletes who participated in a fall season sport. Athletic departments must address their student-athletes' psychological distress by facilitating a higher use of mental health services.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Slavin, Lindsey Eve
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Community of Inquiry Survey Instrument: Measurement Invariance in the Community College Population

Description: This study aimed to observe measurement invariance between community college students and university students in response to the Community of Inquiry (CoI) Survey instrument. Most studies of the CoI survey instruments have recorded and validated the instruments considering undergraduate or graduate students. This study sought to validate and prove the survey tool as a reliable instrument for the community college population. The study employed SEM and meta-analytic procedures to observe measurement invariance between a Monte Carlo generated general university sample population and the community college survey population. The findings are discussed, as well as the implications for CoI studies in the community college.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Chambers, Roger Antonio
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

A Comprehensive Remedial and Enhancing Cello Method for Professors and Undergraduate Students: Conformation-Based Theoretical Methodology and Sequential Practical Solutions

Description: Undergraduate cellists from diverse pedagogical backgrounds with various levels of technical proficiency often struggle to adapt to the demanding performance standards of the university environment. Frequently, these challenges are caused by technical concepts that have been incorrectly learned or unaddressed in the cellist's previous educational experience. Designed for university cello professors and undergraduate cello students, this study is a remedial and enhancement technical method for developing efficient performance habits; it presents a synthesis of cello performing ideologies, comprehensive technical analysis, physical conformation solutions, original sequential exercises, practice models, and recommendations for supporting literature. The method provides a structured path to expressive mastery and artistic freedom in performing advanced cello repertoire.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Totan, Dan Iuliu Mircea
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Computational and Statistical Modeling of the Virtual Reality Stroop Task

Description: The purpose of this research was two-fold: (1) further validate the Virtual Reality Stroop Task HMMWV [VRST; Stroop stimuli embedded within a virtual high mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle] via a comparison of the 3-dimensional VRST factor structure to that of a 2-dimensional computerized version of the Stroop task; and (2) model the performance of machine learning [ML] classifiers and hyper-parameters for an adaptive version of the VRST. Both the 3-D VRST and 2-D computerized Stroop tasks produced two-factor solutions: an accuracy factor and a reaction time factor. The factors had low correlations suggesting participants may be focusing on either responding to stimuli accurately or swiftly. In future studies researchers may want to consider throughput, a measure of correct responses per unit of time. The assessment of naive Bayes (NB), k-nearest neighbors (kNN), and support vector machines (SVM) machine learning classifiers found that SVM classifiers tended to have the highest accuracies and greatest areas under the curve when classifying users as high or low performers. NB also performed well but kNN algorithms did not. As such, SVM and NB may be the best candidates for creation of an adaptive version of the VRST.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Asbee, Justin M
Partner: UNT Libraries

Computational Modeling of Cancer-Related Mutations in DNA Repair Enzymes Using Molecular Dynamics and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics

Description: This dissertation details the use of computational methods to understand the effect that cancer-related mutations have on proteins that complex with nucleic acids. Firstly, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of various mutations in DNA polymerase κ (pol κ). Through an experimental collaboration, we classify the mutations as more or less active than the wild type complex, depending upon the incoming nucleotide triphosphate. From these classifications we use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) to explore the reaction mechanism. Preliminary analysis points to a novel method for nucleotide addition in pol κ. Secondly, we study the ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) enzyme in various contexts. We find that the identities of both the substrate and complementary strands (or lack thereof) are crucial for maintaining the complex structure. Separately, we find that point mutations within the protein can affect structural features throughout the complex, only at distal sites, or only within the active site. The mutation's position within the complex alone is not indicative of its impact. Thirdly, we share a new method that combines direct coupling analysis and MD to predict potential rescue mutations using poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 as a model enzyme. Fourthly, we perform MD simulations of mutations in the protection of telomeres 1 (POT1) enzyme. The investigated variants modify the POT1-ssDNA complex dynamics and protein—DNA interactions. Fifthly, we investigate the incorporation of remdesivir and other nucleotide analogue prodrugs into the protein-RNA complex of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. We find evidence for destabilization throughout the complex and differences in inter-subunit communication for most of the incorporation patterns studied. Finally, we share a method for determining a minimum active region for QM/MM simulations. The method is validated using 4-oxalocrotonate, TET2, and DNA polymerase λ as test cases.
This item is restricted from view until December 1, 2022.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Leddin, Emmett Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries

Considerations in Designing Alloys for Laser-Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing

Description: This work identifies alloy terminal freezing range, columnar growth, grain coarsening, liquid availability towards the terminal stage of solidification, and segregation towards boundaries as primary factors affecting the hot-cracking susceptibility of fusion-based additive manufacturing (F-BAM) processed alloys. Additionally, an integrated computational materials engineering (ICME)-based approach has been formulated to design novel Al alloys, and high entropy alloys for F-BAM processing. The ICME-based approach has led to heterogeneous nucleation-induced grain refinement, terminal eutectic solidification-enabled liquid availability, and segregation-induced coalescence of solidification boundaries during laser-powder bed fusion (L-PBF) processing. In addition to exhibiting a wide crack-free L-PBF processing window, the designed alloys exhibited microstructural heterogeneity and hierarchy (MHH), and thus could leverage the unique process dynamics of L-PBF to produce a fine-tunable MHH and mechanical behavior. Furthermore, alloy chemistry-based fine tuning of the stacking fault energy has led to transformative damage tolerant alloys. Such alloys can shield defects stemming from the stochastic powder bed in L-PBF, and consequently can prevent catastrophic failure despite the solidification defects. A modified materials systems approach that explicitly includes alloy chemistry as a means to modify the printability, properties and performance with F-BAM is also presented. Overall, this work is expected to facilitate application specific manufacture with F-BAM and eventually facilitate widespread adoption of F-BAM in structural application.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2027.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Thapliyal, Saket
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Correlation of Watershed NDVI Values to Benthic Macroinvertebrate Biodiversity in Eight North American Wadeable Streams

Description: Water quality of a stream or river is influenced by the surrounding landscape and vegetation. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is commonly used to characterize landcover and vegetation density. Benthic macroinvertebrates are ubiquitous in freshwater streams and are excellent indicators of the quality of freshwater habitats. Data from one NDVI remote sensing flight and one macroinvertebrate sampling event for eight wadeable stream study sites in the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) were acquired. Proportions of high, moderate, and sparse vegetation were calculated for each stream watershed using ArcGIS. Functional feeding groups and tolerance values were assigned to macroinvertebrate taxa. The Fourth-corner and RLQ methods of analysis, available in the ade4 package for R software, were used to evaluate the relationships of macroinvertebrate traits with environmental variables. Hypothesis testing using Model 6 in the ade4 package resulted in p-values of 0.066 and 0.057 for global (overall) significance. Mean NDVI values of moderately vegetated areas and proportion of sparse vegetation were found to be significant to percent shredders at alpha ≤ 0.05. Results of these methods of analysis, when combined with traditional macroinvertebrate sampling metrics, show that NDVI can be a useful, additional tool to characterize a watershed and its effects on macroinvertebrate community composition and structure.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Gallagher, Denice Lynne
Partner: UNT Libraries

Corrosion Behavior of High Entropy Alloys in Molten Chloride and Molten Fluoride Salts

Description: High entropy alloys (HEAs) or complex concentrated alloys (CCAs) represent a new paradigm in structural alloy design. Molten salt corrosion behavior was studied for single-phase HEAs such as TaTiVWZr and HfTaTiVZr, and multi-phase HEAs such as AlCoCrFeNi2.1. De-alloying with porosity formation along the exposed surface and fluxing of unstable oxides were found to be primary corrosion mechanisms. Potentiodynamic polarization study was combined with systematic mass–loss study for TaTiVWZr, HfTaTiVZr, and AlCoCrFeNi2.1 as a function of temperature. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used for monitoring the corrosion of TaTiVWZr and HfTaTiVZr in molten fluoride salt at 650 oC. TaTiVWZr and AlCoCrFeNi2.1 showed low corrosion rate in the range of 5.5-7.5 mm/year and low mass-loss in the range of 35-40 mg/cm2 in molten chloride salt at 650 oC. Both TaTiVWZr and HfTaTiVZr showed similar mass loss in the range of 31-33 mg/cm2, which was slightly higher than IN 718 (~ 28 mg/cm2) in molten fluoride salt at 650 oC. Ta-W rich dendrite region in TaTiVWZr showed higher corrosion resistance against dissolution of alloying elements in the molten salt environment. AlCoCrFeNi2.1 showed higher resistance to galvanic corrosion compared to Duplex steel 2205 in molten chloride salt environment. These results suggest the potential use of HEAs/CCAs as structural materials in the molten salt environment for concentrating solar power and nuclear reactor systems.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2024.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Patel, Kunjalkumar Babubhai
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Counseling Experiences of Clients Who are Polyamorous: A Phenomenological Inquiry

Description: Polyamory is an identity that describes the ability to experience romantic love with more than one romantic partner at a time. Polyamory is often perceived as being perverse, amoral, and relationally broken or deficient; however, people who identify as polyamorous are found to be as mentally healthy and happy as people who are monogamous. Clients who identify as polyamorous may experience their counselor as lacking familiarity with and knowledge of polyamory or as actively working against their identity. This study was a phenomenological inquiry designed to illuminate the counseling experiences of polyamorous people. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with eight participants and analyzed with a modified van Kaam method with relational-cultural theory as the framework. The three major findings that constitute the essence of this inquiry were: (a) participants experienced disappointment and disrespect in the counselor's ignorance of their vital identities, (b) the necessities of trust and connection between participant and counselor for empowerment and growth, and (c) the complementary nature of relationality in polyamory and counseling. These findings indicated counselors should seek a baseline of education on polyamory. The implications for counselor educators were to strive to envelope counselors-in-training in a culture that supports developing multicultural competency and to create continuing education on marginalized populations to best support in-practice counselors. These efforts increase the likelihood that polyamorists are able to receive effective counseling that supports them holistically.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Stevens, Carly Rachel
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Cultures of Elite Theatre in the Elizabethan and Jacobean Masque: Four Incarnations

Description: The early modern English masque is a hybrid form of entertainment that included music, dance, poetry, and visual spectacle, and for which there is no modern equivalent. This dissertation looks at four incarnations of the Elizabethan and Jacobean masque: the court masque, the masque embedded in the progress entertainment, the masque embedded in the commercial play, and the masque embedded in the commercial play performed at court. This study treats masques as a form of elite theatre (that is, theatre for, by, and about elite figures like monarchs and aristocrats) and follows them from the court to the countryside, through the commercial playhouse, and back again to the court in pursuit of a more nuanced picture of the hybridity and flexibility of early modern English performance culture.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Rogener, Lauren J
Partner: UNT Libraries

The D-Variant of Transfinite Hausdorff Dimension

Description: In this lecture we introduce a new transfinite dimension function for metric spaces which utilizes Henderson's topological D-dimension and ascribes to any metric space either an ordinal number or the symbol Ω. The construction of our function is motivated by that of Urbański's transfinite Hausdorff dimension, tHD. Henderson's dimension is a topological invariant, however, like Hausdorff dimension and tHD the function presented will be invariant under bi-Lipschitz continuous maps and generally not under homeomorphisms. We present some original results on D-dimension and build the general theory for the D-variant of transfinite Hausdorff dimension, \mathrm{t}_D\mathrm{HD}. In particular, we will show for any ordinal number α, existence of a metrizable space which has \mathrm{t}_D\mathrm{HD} greater than or equal to α and less than or equal to \omega_\tau, where τ is the least ordinal which satisfies α < \omega_\tau.
This item is restricted from view until December 1, 2022.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Decker, Bryce
Partner: UNT Libraries
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