Search Results

open access

Personalized Adaptive Teacher Education to Increase Self-Efficacy: Toward a Framework for Teacher Education

Description: This study investigated personalized adaptive learning, teacher education, and self-efficacy to determine if personalized adaptive teacher education can increase self-efficacy. It is suggested that teachers with higher self-efficacy tend to stay in the teaching profession longer. Chapters 2 and 3 are literature reviews on personalizing adaptive learning to determine what common components are used in personalized adaptive learning systems to get a clear understanding of what previous literature suggests building this study on it. Chapter 4 investigates the data collected from 385 teachers to understand better what teachers report on factors that increase their self-efficacy. As a result, it was found that teachers' self-efficacy increases with more training, support, and resources. In chapter 5, a framework was developed based on previous findings, with components of personalized adaptive learning to provide support/help at the right time for teachers to increase their self-efficacy. An empirical study was conducted to validate this framework, where the framework was used as a guide to personalize and adapt summer teacher preservice training and survey teachers on their self-efficacy before and after the training to see its impact on teachers' self-efficacy. However, since summer preservice training was virtual, the framework could not be implemented fully, as we were not able to observe teachers' behaviors and monitor their learning to provide them help and support, as needed and being in the post-COVID-19 year as educators dealing with about two-year learning loss systemwide, seems decreased teachers' self-efficacy. The findings of this study can guide preservice teacher education institutions and decision-makers of teacher education to assess inservice teachers' needs and self-efficacy to help and support them with a more personalized adaptive education to improve their self-efficacy.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Shemshack, Atikah
Partner: UNT Libraries

High-Immersion Virtual Reality for Language Learning

Description: This manuscript-style dissertation consists of three publications interconnected in their focus on the dynamically evolving use of immersive virtual reality technologies for language education. The manuscripts included in this dissertation were adapted from three research papers published or submitted for publication in scientific journals and book chapters. The first manuscript provides an overview of immersive technologies of different levels of immersion, ranging from 2D displays on a flat screen to highly immersive interactive experiences rendered in virtual reality using head-mounted displays. The second manuscript is a systematic review, and it narrows down the scope of immersive technologies outlined in the previous publication by exploring existing research on the technologies related to the highest level of immersion for language learning, namely the high-immersion virtual reality technologies. The third manuscript continues to investigate the application of those technologies for language learning, but the focus is shifted from examining virtual reality applications to exploring language teachers' beliefs about using those technologies. This dissertation offers a comprehensive overview of high-immersion virtual reality use for language learning which may serve as an ideal starting point for researchers and educators interested in learning more about the current state of virtual reality integration in schools from the perspectives of both language learners and teachers.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2024.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Kucher, Tetyana
Partner: UNT Libraries

Investigation of Gene Functions in the Cyanotrophic Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764

Description: Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764 (Pf11764) is one of a group of bacteria known as cyanotrophs that exhibit the unique ability to grow on toxic cyanide as the sole nitrogen source. This ability has previously been genetically linked to a conserved cluster of seven genes (Nit1C), the signature gene (nitC) coding for a nitrilase enzyme. Nitrilases convert nitriles to ammonia and a carboxylic acid. Still, for the Pf11764 NitC enzyme (Nit11764), no in vivo substrate has been identified, and the basis of the enzyme's requirement for cyanide growth has remained unclear. Therefore, the gene was cloned and the enzyme was characterized with respect to its structure and function. These efforts resulted in the unique discovery that, aside from its nitrilase activity, Nit11764 exhibits nuclease activity towards both DNA and RNA. This ability is consistent with computer analysis of the protein providing evidence of a preponderance of amino acids with a high probability for RNA binding. A Nit11764 knock-out mutant was shown to exhibit a higher sensitivity to both cyanide (KCN) and mitomycin C, both known to induce chromosomal damage. Thus, the overall conclusion is that Nit11764, and likely the entire Nit1C gene cluster, functions as a possible repair mechanism for overcoming the damage inflicted on Pf11764 nucleic acids by toxic cyanide. Towards a further investigation of the Nit1C gene cluster in Pf11764, a second gene (nitH) annotated as a monooxygenase was also investigated. Interestingly, computer-based analysis shows that NitH also harbors a preponderance of RNA-binding amino acids. The nitH gene was cloned into an expression vector with the long-range goal of defining its role in CN utilization.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2027.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Gullapalli, Jaya Swetha
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

"Rein of Renegades"

Description: Rein of Renegades is an introduction to the young adult contemporary fantasy novel of the same name. It is prefaced with an explication of various drafts written throughout adolescence. I am trying to reclaim things I've misplaced or dropped. Over the past few years, I've had much too many trinkets to carry. There went the melodramatic allegations from my teenage writing voice, cracked on a classroom floor. There went the ability to sit, stomach deep, so steadily grounded in another world, this escape blurred with the strawberry ice cream I dripped onto the campus concrete. Writing the ideal love becomes complicated, jaded, too realistic when the hands writing it are always reaching for someone who never reaches back at the right time
Date: May 2022
Creator: Ulery, Sarah
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Practice of Content-Driven Composition for Instrument and Computer

Description: Two compositions, live electronic music for instrument and computer, have been analyzed in the essay to reflect one of my aesthetics principles, content-driven composition, and the solutions that the I have applied to solve the problems which have occurred in practice. By content-driven, I mean that compositional process, material, mood, and affect are expressions of content drawn from visual art, literature, nature, religion, traditional aesthetics and other non-musical sources. During the journey of exploration, I was often deeply moved and inspired by a historical moment, a real-world story, a film, a poem, a statement, an image, a piece of music, or a natural law. In content-driven works, these elements play a major role in the creative processes.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Shen, Qi
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Impact of Processing Parameters and Forces on Channels Created by Friction Stir Bobbin Tools

Description: In this thesis, friction stir channeling (FSC) and its process parameters influence on geometry, surface quality and productivity are explored. The probe of the friction stir processing (FSP) tool used to perform these tests was a modified submerged bobbin tool made of MP 159 Co-Ni alloy. The body was made from H13 tool steel. To find the optimal channel conditions for a targeted range of process parameters, multiple 6061 aluminum samples were prepared with a U shape guide to test the effects of different spindle speeds and feed rates. Using a gantry-type computer numerical control (CNC) friction stir welding (FSW) machine, the aluminum coupons were subjected to calibration experiments, force control tests, and an increased production rate to test these effects. It was found through experimentation that the programmed feed rates, spindle speeds and forces produced by the machine had an impact on the channel geometry. It was determined from the force-controlled setup that 8.46 mm/s at 750 RPM was the best combination of results for the four conditions tested on a CNC friction stir processing-machine. It was then tested at 10.58 mm/s at 800 RPM, which had comparable results with the best combination of input parameters from the force-controlled runs which demonstrates the utility of the process in high production settings. Finally, a proof-of-concept experiment was performed on a robotic arm outfitted with a FSW holder, showing acceptable results. This is a validation of its future implementation in the manufacturing of large parts for lightweight, aerospace, and automotive applications.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Koonce, James G
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Assessing New Dimensions of an Organization's Learning Culture

Description: Work-based and employee-driven informal learning, training and development have been increasing in importance in the last few decades. Concurrently, organizations seek to measure the extent to which they develop a culture and structure that supports individual learning and organizational learning. This study develops and validates a scale that can measure the extent to which an organization is perceived to provide online learning that is personalized for its employees and perceived to recognize skills and competencies acquired through non-degree and other pathways. This research can provide organizations with the ability to measure and benchmark attributes of their learning culture that are important to work-based and lifelong learning as well as talent recruitment and management.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Scott, Jennifer Lyne
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Community of Inquiry Survey Instrument: Measurement Invariance in the Community College Population

Description: This study aimed to observe measurement invariance between community college students and university students in response to the Community of Inquiry (CoI) Survey instrument. Most studies of the CoI survey instruments have recorded and validated the instruments considering undergraduate or graduate students. This study sought to validate and prove the survey tool as a reliable instrument for the community college population. The study employed SEM and meta-analytic procedures to observe measurement invariance between a Monte Carlo generated general university sample population and the community college survey population. The findings are discussed, as well as the implications for CoI studies in the community college.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Chambers, Roger Antonio
Partner: UNT Libraries

Public Opinion and Maintaining Political Power: The Case of AKP Government and Social Media in Turkey

Description: This dissertation consists of three chapters, aiming to analyze, understand and discuss how Turkish public opinion fluctuates on social media based on governmental actions and how that fluctuation affects the society and politics in Turkey. Using textual data from social media, I combined natural language processing techniques with statistical methods, to study how Turkish public opinion is shaped by governmental actions in various scenarios. In the first chapter, I created a social network of Twitter users to detect the differences in the extent of political polarization between pro-government and opposition voters during the June 2019 Istanbul mayoral election. The second chapter focuses on the stigmatization of a social/religious group in Turkey by government-driven labeling and terrorism designation. Word embeddings are used to pinpoint the offensive language and the hate campaign against the group, considering the labels that are used to identify the group. Finally, the third chapter examines the rally-around-the-flag effect during highly inciting moments like cross-border military operations. A corpus of tweets for each of the two Turkish cross-border military operations is analyzed using topic modeling and sentiment analysis to get a grasp of the rally effect and how the governments can benefit in internal matters from the changes in public discourse because of this rally effect.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2024.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Demirhan, Emirhan
Partner: UNT Libraries

CFD Study of Ship Hydrodynamics in Calm Water with Shear Current and in Designed Wave Trails

Description: Although the capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in modeling ship hydrodynamics is well explored in many studies, they still have two main limitations. First, those studies ignore the effect of non-uniform shear current which exists in realistic situation. Second, the focus of most studies was laid more on the seakeeping/maneuvering performance and less attention was paid to survivability of ships due to extreme ship response events in waves, which are considered rare events but influential. In this thesis, we explore the capability of CFD in those two areas. In the first part of the thesis, the hydrodynamic performance of KCS in the presence of a non-uniform shear current is investigated for the first time using high-fidelity CFD simulations. Various shear current conditions with different directions were considered and results were compared with the ones with no shear current. The second part of the thesis focuses on study of rare events of ship responses by development of extreme response conditioning techniques to design the wave trail. Two conditioned techniques based on Gaussian and non-Gaussian processes are considered.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2024.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Phan, Khang Minh
Partner: UNT Libraries

To Constrain or Tame: Aristotle and Machiavelli on Demagogy

Description: What defines demagogues and what sort of threat do they pose to democracy? Contemporary politics has recently witnessed a rise in demagogic leaders around the globe. Following this trend, many notable scholars have sought to better define the ancient term and to provide politics with advice on how to handle them. However, demagogy is hard to define, and research is divided over what truly makes for a demagogue. Scholars tend to either focus on the intention, the tools, or the effects of leaders to categorize demagogy. While they might disagree over which aspect of demagogy is most salient, they are more unanimous in their claims regarding the threat that demagogy poses to democracy. Before we outright condemn demagogy, I argue that we should better understand the phenomenon and its relationship to democracy. This dissertation turns to Machiavelli and Aristotle in order to better grasp and better define the phenomenon of demagogy. I first build a concept of demagogy through Aristotle's Politics and then use that concept to detect a similar phenomenon within the work of Machiavelli. In many ways Aristotle and Machiavelli affirm the claims of contemporary scholars, especially regarding the threat that demagogy poses to democracy. According to both thinkers, demagogy involves the use of factions, class enmities, and the corruption of law. Possibly more troubling, both show how the methods of demagogy remain an ever-present possibility to democratic rule. Nevertheless, Aristotle and Machiavelli disagree with contemporary scholarship on how to address the problem of demagogy. Rather than seek out ways to constrain the demagogue, the two philosophers dedicate themselves to providing an education to demagogues. Even more surprisingly, this dissertation argues that both have covertly tried to persuade others to adopt the methods of demagogy for the sake of better preserving democracy and perhaps even to improve upon …
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2024.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Graham, Sebastian R
Partner: UNT Libraries

Time-Dependent Deformation Mechanisms in Metallic Glasses as a Function of Their Structural State

Description: In this study, the time-dependent deformation behavior of several model bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) was studied. The BMGs were obtained in different structural states by thermal relaxation below their glass transition temperature, cryogenic thermal cycling, and chemical rejuvenation by micro-alloying. The creep behavior of Zr52.5Ti5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10 BMG in different structural states was investigated as a function of peak load and temperature. The creep strain rate sensitivity (SRS) indicated a transition from shear transformation zone (STZ) mediated deformation at room temperature to diffusion dominated mechanisms at high temperatures. The relaxation enthalpy of Zr47Cu46Al7 BMG was found to increase significantly with the addition of 1 at% Ti, namely for Zr47Cu45Al7Ti1. Comparison of their respective free volumes indicated that chemical rejuvenation had a more pronounced effect compared to cryogenic thermal rejuvenation. Micro-pillar compression tests supported the improved plasticity with increase in free volume from the rejuvenation effect. Effect of chemistry change on mechanical response and time-dependent deformation was investigated for topologically equivalent Pt-Pd BMGs, where the Pt atoms were systematically replaced with Pd atoms (Pt42.5-xPdx)Cu27Ni9.5P21: x=0, 7.5, 20, 22.5, 35, 42.5). The hardness and reduced modulus increased while the degree of plasticity decreased with increase in Pd-content, which was attributed to the increase in stiffer 3-atom cluster connections. STZ volume was calculated for all the BMGs using cooperative shear model (CSM) for fundamental understanding of the underlying deformation mechanisms.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2024.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Ghodki, Nandita
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

No Escape from Modality: Impact of Video vs. Text on Perceived Credibility and Engagement with Misinformation

Description: Misinformation remains pervasive in digital platforms, shaping how individuals receive news online. Prior work suggests that credibility perceptions of misinformation can differ based on the modality of the misinformation message. Informed by the MAIN model, this quantitative study conducted two separate 2 (Modality: video or text) x 2 (Social endorsement cues: high vs. low) between-subject experiments to assess the influence of message modality and social endorsement cues on misinformation credibility judgments. The experiments reviewed two different topics of misinformation: artificial intelligence technology malfunction (N = 296) and a cure for cancer (N = 306). Results for Study 1 on artificial intelligent technology malfunction misinformation indicated that participants who viewed the video modality judged a higher perception of source expertise and message credibility. The results of Study 2 suggested that the text presentation of health misinformation prompted higher message elaboration relative to the video conditions. Findings suggest that modality does influence how people judge misinformation messages depending on the subject matter. In addition, source credibility influences how people judge message credibility. The paper concludes with a discussion of theoretical implications and practical applications.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Tran, Jacinta T
Partner: UNT Libraries

Fabrication and Testing of Polymeric Flexible Sheets with Asymmetric Distributed Magnetic Particles for Biomedical Actuated Devices

Description: This thesis explores a method to fabricate magnetic membranes with asymmetric distribution of particles and their testing as actuators. Focus of this research is to fabricate thin polymeric sheets and thickness range of 120-125µm, with asymmetric distribution of magnetic nano particles, employing micromagnets during the fabrication. The micromagnets are used to localize the magnetic particles during the curing process at selected locations. The effect of the asymmetric distribution of magnetic particles in the membrane is used for the first time. Magnetite (Fe3O4) is used as the magnetic particles that is embedded into a polymeric membrane made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS); the membrane is then tested in terms of deflection observed by using a high-resolution camera. From the perspective of the biomedical application, PDMS is chosen for its excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties, and Fe3O4 for its non-toxic nature. Since magnetic actuation does not require onboard batteries or other power systems, it is very convenient to use in embedded devices or where the access is made difficult. A comparative study of membranes with asymmetric and randomly distributed particles is carried out in this thesis. The asymmetric distribution of magnetic particles can benefit applications involving localized and targeted treatments and precision medicine.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2023.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Bakaraju, Megha Ramya
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

"What we know is how we've survived": Tribal Emergency Management and the Resilience Paradox

Description: In order to more fully inform moves toward equity in emergency management (EM), this research seeks to describe a general landscape of professional Tribal EM, and in particular, to examine how Tribal emergency managers and Tribal Nations are situated in relation to the EM enterprise (EME), and how they are doing resilience in their Tribal Nations. The findings presented in this dissertation reflect efforts to explore and document Tribal emergency managers' descriptions of their work and their perceptions about its context as they seek to do resilience in their Tribes. Specifically, qualitative interviews were conducted with Tribal emergency managers whose Tribal Nations span the United States. Findings indicate that there is significant variation among Tribal nations in terms of EM structures and capacities; Tribal emergency managers engage in a wide array of activities to promote resilience in their communities; and Tribal EM is becoming increasingly professionalized. Importantly, however, the research also uncovered a paradox in which Tribal emergency managers, both implicitly and explicitly excluded from the EME in many ways, find themselves doing resilience in the context of an increasingly popular disaster resilience paradigm that both increasingly shifts the burden of resilience to the local level, and expands the range of tasks associated with successful resilience processes. The dissertation concludes by discussing conceptual and practical implications of the research as well as directions for future research in this area.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Dent, Lauren
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Understanding the Needs of Educators in Environmental Education Programming

Description: This thesis describes a study conducted for the San Antonio River Authority to understand the needs of educators in environmental education programming. This study explores the experiences of educators in teaching environmental education, the tools and methodologies they use, what they think and feel about environmental education, and what their needs are when selecting environmental education curricula and programming to engage their students. This thesis contains an extensive literature review relevant to the local environment in San Antonio, Texas, equity in access to education in borderland regions, educator training, and environmental education goals and methodologies. The study utilizes both qualitative and quantitative research tools: a survey and a collection of semi-structured interviews. The findings of this study indicate that educators are looking for environmental education curricula and programming that is convenient to use and access, training that gives them confidence to teach environmental concepts, curricula and training that helps them facilitate a sense of wonder and engagement in their students, and more content that is locally relevant.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Villegas, Morgan P
Partner: UNT Libraries

Computational Modeling of Cancer-Related Mutations in DNA Repair Enzymes Using Molecular Dynamics and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics

Description: This dissertation details the use of computational methods to understand the effect that cancer-related mutations have on proteins that complex with nucleic acids. Firstly, we perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of various mutations in DNA polymerase κ (pol κ). Through an experimental collaboration, we classify the mutations as more or less active than the wild type complex, depending upon the incoming nucleotide triphosphate. From these classifications we use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) to explore the reaction mechanism. Preliminary analysis points to a novel method for nucleotide addition in pol κ. Secondly, we study the ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) enzyme in various contexts. We find that the identities of both the substrate and complementary strands (or lack thereof) are crucial for maintaining the complex structure. Separately, we find that point mutations within the protein can affect structural features throughout the complex, only at distal sites, or only within the active site. The mutation's position within the complex alone is not indicative of its impact. Thirdly, we share a new method that combines direct coupling analysis and MD to predict potential rescue mutations using poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 as a model enzyme. Fourthly, we perform MD simulations of mutations in the protection of telomeres 1 (POT1) enzyme. The investigated variants modify the POT1-ssDNA complex dynamics and protein—DNA interactions. Fifthly, we investigate the incorporation of remdesivir and other nucleotide analogue prodrugs into the protein-RNA complex of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. We find evidence for destabilization throughout the complex and differences in inter-subunit communication for most of the incorporation patterns studied. Finally, we share a method for determining a minimum active region for QM/MM simulations. The method is validated using 4-oxalocrotonate, TET2, and DNA polymerase λ as test cases.
This item is restricted from view until December 1, 2022.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Leddin, Emmett Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Computational and Statistical Modeling of the Virtual Reality Stroop Task

Description: The purpose of this research was two-fold: (1) further validate the Virtual Reality Stroop Task HMMWV [VRST; Stroop stimuli embedded within a virtual high mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle] via a comparison of the 3-dimensional VRST factor structure to that of a 2-dimensional computerized version of the Stroop task; and (2) model the performance of machine learning [ML] classifiers and hyper-parameters for an adaptive version of the VRST. Both the 3-D VRST and 2-D computerized Stroop tasks produced two-factor solutions: an accuracy factor and a reaction time factor. The factors had low correlations suggesting participants may be focusing on either responding to stimuli accurately or swiftly. In future studies researchers may want to consider throughput, a measure of correct responses per unit of time. The assessment of naive Bayes (NB), k-nearest neighbors (kNN), and support vector machines (SVM) machine learning classifiers found that SVM classifiers tended to have the highest accuracies and greatest areas under the curve when classifying users as high or low performers. NB also performed well but kNN algorithms did not. As such, SVM and NB may be the best candidates for creation of an adaptive version of the VRST.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Asbee, Justin M
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Guåhan: A (De)Colonial Borderland

Description: Answering the call to decenter whiteness and coloniality within communication studies (#RhetoricSoWhite), this project attempts to reclaim space for indigenous knowledge and to serve decolonial struggles. Written as a project of love for my fellow indigenous scholars and peoples, I expand upon Tiara Na'puti's conceptualization of "Indigeneity as Analytic" and chart how indigenous Pacific Island decolonial resistance operates through a paradigm of decolonial futurity. By recognizing Guåhan (Guam), as well as Chamoru, bodies as (de)colonial borderlands, I demonstrate the radical potential of indigeneity through three different case studies. First, I name indigenous feminine style as a strategic mode of public address adopted by Governor Lou Leon Guerero to resist the spread of COVID-19 by US military personnel on the island of Guåhan. Second, I showcase how the process and practice of indigenous Pacific Island tattooing delinks away from coloniality. Finally, I demonstrate how the celebration of a Chamoru saint, Santa Marian Kamalen, provides a spatial-temporal intervention that articulates an indigenous religion and enacts a decolonial futurity.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Torre Jr., Joaquin Vincent
Partner: UNT Libraries

Autonomic Zero Trust Framework for Network Protection

Description: With the technological improvements, the number of Internet connected devices is increasing tremendously. We also observe an increase in cyberattacks since the attackers want to use all these interconnected devices for malicious intention. Even though there exist many proactive security solutions, it is not practical to run all the security solutions on them as they have limited computational resources and even battery operated. As an alternative, Zero Trust Architecture (ZTA) has become popular is because it defines boundaries and requires to monitor all events, configurations, and connections and evaluate them to enforce rejecting by default and accepting only if they are known and accepted as well as applies a continuous trust evaluation. In addition, we need to be able to respond as quickly as possible, which cannot be managed by human interaction but through autonomous computing paradigm. Therefore, in this work, we propose a framework that would implement ZTA using autonomous computing paradigm. The proposed solution, Autonomic ZTA Management Engine (AZME) framework, focusing on enforcing ZTA on network, uses a set of sensors to monitor a network, a set of user-defined policies to define which actions to be taken (through controller). We have implemented a Python prototype as a proof-of-concept that checks network packets and enforce ZTA by checking the individual source and destination based on the given policies and continuously evaluate the trust of connections. If an unaccepted connection is made, it can block the connection by creating firewall rule at runtime.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2023.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Durflinger, James
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

New Computational Methods for Literature-Based Discovery

Description: In this work, we leverage the recent developments in computer science to address several of the challenges in current literature-based discovery (LBD) solutions. First, LBD solutions cannot use semantics or are too computational complex. To solve the problems we propose a generative model OverlapLDA based on topic modeling, which has been shown both effective and efficient in extracting semantics from a corpus. We also introduce an inference method of OverlapLDA. We conduct extensive experiments to show the effectiveness and efficiency of OverlapLDA in LBD. Second, we expand LBD to a more complex and realistic setting. The settings are that there can be more than one concept connecting the input concepts, and the connectivity pattern between concepts can also be more complex than a chain. Current LBD solutions can hardly complete the LBD task in the new setting. We simplify the hypotheses as concept sets and propose LBDSetNet based on graph neural networks to solve this problem. We also introduce different training schemes based on self-supervised learning to train LBDSetNet without relying on comprehensive labeled hypotheses that are extremely costly to get. Our comprehensive experiments show that LBDSetNet outperforms strong baselines on simple hypotheses and addresses complex hypotheses.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Ding, Juncheng
Partner: UNT Libraries

Student Belonging: A Critical Narrative Inquiry of Grenadian Secondary Students' Storied Experiences in Schooling

Description: Including all students through the educative processes is instrumental to their success. Each student's journey through education is therefore impacted by the ways they are included in the classroom. As such, social inclusion, and academic inclusion underpinned by a general sense of belonging are key elements impacting students' successes in schooling. Both globally and nationally school systems face challenges in enacting policies, pedagogies, and practices to meet the needs of increasingly diverse student populations. Student voice which has historically been absent from the literature can be a valuable tool in accounting for the lived experiences of diverse students with or without a formal label of dis/ability. Student voice can (re)present a revelatory tool that can be acted upon in responding to these diverse needs. Thus, the purpose of this study was to explore how secondary students in Grenada with or without a label of learning dis/ability but who are considered as part of responsive inclusive education, experience a sense of belonging through academic and social inclusion. This qualitative study using critical narrative inquiry pursued through semi-structured interviews with students, their teachers and parents revealed resonant threads of strained responsive education, childism and coloniality, the pedagogy of nice and an elusive inclusive education. Recommendations are therefore made to center student voice and choice, further the decolonization of schooling, create improved systems of evaluation and diagnosis of specific learning challenges, and to provide extensive teacher training so that the needs of diverse learners can be met. The findings have the potential to encourage and introduce collaborative educational practices amongst teacher-practitioners, students, and Grenada's Ministry of Education and thereby improve responsive models for secondary learners of diverse abilities.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2027.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Henry-Packer, Caroline Jacinta
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Engineering Whole Cell-Based Biosensors for Heavy Metal Detection Using Metalloregulatory Transcriptional Repressors of the SmtB/ArsR Family

Description: This study focuses on engineering whole cell-based biosensors for heavy metal detection. Through the exploitation of metalloregulatory proteins, fabrication of metal ion-responsive biosensors is achieved. Metalloregulatory proteins of the SmtB/ArsR family including arsenite-responsive ArsR, cadmium-responsive CadC, zinc-responsive CzrA, and nickel-responsive NmtR were evaluated as biosensor sensing modules. Characterization of these four metal sensing modules was accomplished through quantification of a reporter green fluorescence protein (gfp) gene. As such, biosensors pCTYC-r34ArsR-pL(ArsOvN)GFP and pCTYC-r34CadC-pL(CadOv1)GFP displayed excellent gfp expression and sensitivity to As(III) and Cd (II), respectively. These two biosensors were consequently selected and successfully implemented in soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida. Lastly, a proof of concept arsenite-responsive genetic toggle switch is proposed utilizing PurRcelR467 (PC47), a cellobiose-responsive gene, and an LAA degradation tag. Overall, this study expands the bank of metalloregulatory bioparts for heavy metal sensing in the aim of constructing an optimized water monitoring system.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Draeger, Alison
Partner: UNT Libraries

Low-Power Biopotential Signal Acquisition System for Biomedical Applications

Description: The key requirements of a reliable neural signal recording system include low power to support long-term monitoring, low noise, minimum tissue damage, and wireless transmission. The neural spikes are also detected and sorted on-chip/off-chip to implement closed-loop neuromodulation in a high channel count setup. All these features together constitute an empirical neural recording system for neuroscience research. In this prospectus, we propose to develop a neural signal acquisition system with wireless transmission and feature extraction. We start by designing a prototype entirely built with commercial-off-the-shelf components, which includes recording and wireless transmission of synthetic neural data and feature extraction. We then conduct the CMOS implementation of the low-power multi-channel neural signal recording read-out circuit, which enables the in-vivo recording with a small form factor. Another direction of this thesis is to design a self-powered motion tracking read-out circuit for wearable sensors. As the wearable industry continues to advance, the need for self-powered medical devices is growing significantly. In this line of research, we propose a self-powered motion sensor based on reverse electrowetting-on-dielectric (REWOD) with low-power integrated electronics for remotely monitoring health conditions. We design the low-power read-out circuit for a wide range of input charges, which is generated from the REWOD sensor.
This item is restricted from view until December 1, 2022.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Tasneem, Nishat Tarannum
Partner: UNT Libraries
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