Search Results

open access

Synthesis, Phase Development, and the Mechanism for Negative Thermal Expansion in Aluminum Tungstate

Description: An in-depth study of Al2W3O12 negative thermal expansion (NTE) ceramic was performed, focused on synthesis, phase mappings, and the underlying mechanisms shown to be responsible for NTE. Review of the literature has shown inconsistencies in reported values of the dilatometry measured coefficients of thermal expansion, and the temperature for the known monoclinic to orthorhombic phase transition. Two synthesis techniques are introduced: an ionic-liquid non-hydrolytic sol-gel synthesis route; and a low temperature solid state reaction synthesis for Al2W3O12. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to verify the techniques. Two differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments (high and low temperature) were performed on the material showing the transition between -5 and -20 °C and no other phase changes until a reported degradation above 1100 °C. Extensive dilatometry on the material led to the discovery of elastic transitions occurring in the polycrystalline sample capable of explaining the inconsistencies in reported dilatometry results. This is further developed into a proposed model defining the regions between these transitions. Each region has a different thermal expansion as well as a direct effect on the reaction of the material upon cooling. This proposed model may allow more consistent reporting of dilatometry results for NTE materials. Raman spectroscopy was performed from 25-725 °C on the material showing both a joining in the tungsten-oxygen bending modes as well as a broadening in the tungsten-oxygen stretching modes. This is consistent with Al-O-W angle changes along the same temperature range reported in literature as well as the transverse vibrational modes responsible for NTE.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Rose, Kyle
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

A Genetic Approach to Identify Proteins that Interact with Eukaryotic Microtubule Severing Proteins via a Yeast Two Hybrid System

Description: Microtubules (MT) are regulated by multiple categories of proteins, including proteins responsible for severing MTs that are therefore called MT-severing proteins. Studies of katanin, spastin, and fidgetin in animal systems have clarified that these proteins are MT-severing. However, studies in plants have been limited to katanin p60, and little is known about spastin or fidgetin and their function in plants. I looked at plant genomes to identify MT-severing protein homologues to clarify which severing proteins exist in plants. I obtained data from a variety of eukaryotic species to look for MT-severing proteins using homology to human proteins and analyzed these protein sequences to obtain information on the evolution of MT-severing proteins in different species. I focused this analysis on MT-severing proteins in the maize and Arabidopsis thaliana genomes. I created evolutionary phylogenetic trees for katanin-p60, katanin-p80, spastin, and fidgetin using sequences from animal, plant, and fungal genomes. I focused on Arabidopsis spastin and worked to understand its functionality by identifying protein interaction partners. The yeast two-hybrid technique was used to screen an Arabidopsis cDNA library to identify putative spastin interactors. I sought to confirm the putative protein interactions by using molecular tools for protein localization such as the YFP system. Finally, a Biomolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) assay was initiated as a proof of concept for confirmation of in vivo protein-protein interaction.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Alhassan, Hassan H
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Privacy Preserving Machine Learning as a Service

Description: Machine learning algorithms based on neural networks have achieved remarkable results and are being extensively used in different domains. However, the machine learning algorithms requires access to raw data which is often privacy sensitive. To address this issue, we develop new techniques to provide solutions for running deep neural networks over encrypted data. In this paper, we develop new techniques to adopt deep neural networks within the practical limitation of current homomorphic encryption schemes. We focus on training and classification of the well-known neural networks and convolutional neural networks. First, we design methods for approximation of the activation functions commonly used in CNNs (i.e. ReLU, Sigmoid, and Tanh) with low degree polynomials which is essential for efficient homomorphic encryption schemes. Then, we train neural networks with the approximation polynomials instead of original activation functions and analyze the performance of the models. Finally, we implement neural networks and convolutional neural networks over encrypted data and measure performance of the models.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Hesamifard, Ehsan
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Effective Leadership Practices in Improvement-Required Schools

Description: This mixed-methods study identified the effective practices of the principal and leadership team in an Improvement-Required (IR) high school that significantly influenced student achievement and guided their school from IR to a rating of Met Standard in one year. IR or F schools under the new system are schools that failed to meet the state accountability target goals. The high school in this study had a large culturally and economically diverse student population with a high percentage of English learners. The leadership practices were identified through four themes revealed by the qualitative data analysis of focus group and individual in-depth interviews: (a) importance of instructional, collaborative leadership, (b) intentional planning of effective instruction for all students, (c) consistent use of data to guide instruction, and (d) ongoing, data based, targeted staff development. The study findings are significant due to strong corroboration between the qualitative data collected from the interviews and the quantitative results from the faculty survey.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Kimm, Linda L.
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Public Order and Social Control through Religion in the Roman Republic

Description: Rome was among the largest cities in Europe during the Republic era, with a population that was diverse in social status and ethnicity. To maintain public order and social control of such a large, continually growing and shifting population that encompassed mixed cultures and Roman citizens, the Roman elites had to use various methods to keep the peace and maintain social stability. As religion was so deeply ingrained into every aspect of Roman life, it is worth taking a deeper look into how those in charge used it to maintain peace and relative control in Rome and its territories. Chapter 1 offers a brief look at the history of Roman religion, its terms and definitions, and the idea of social control as it pertains to this thesis. Chapter 2 shows the motivations of the Roman elite classes in their use of religion to maintain public order and enforce social control of the mass population. Couched in the need to uphold the Pax Deorum or Peace of the Gods, religious piety and order was cultivated as a means to protect the Republic from harm. Chapter 3 explains how the Patrician and Plebeian classes directed the attention of the residents of Rome with a calendar that was filled with rituals, sacrifices, festivals, and market days. In keeping a busy religious schedule, the people of Rome maintained a constant and direct relationship with the gods. Chapter 4 discusses the importance of women in the roles of priestesses and officers in religious cult to sustain the religious health and welfare of the city of Rome and the smaller communities within the city they inhabited. Chapter 5 examines the use of execution as a religious means of enforcing public order and social control. The chapter explores different means of execution and how they were placed …
Date: May 2020
Creator: Williams, Sheri
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Computational Study of Intermolecular Interactions in Complex Chemical Systems

Description: This work discusses applications of computational simulations to a wide variety of chemical systems, to investigate intermolecular interactions to develop force field parameters and gain new insights into chemical reactivity and structure stability. First, we cover the characterization of hydrogen-bonding interactions in pyrazine tetracarboxamide complexes employing quantum topological analyses. Second we describe the use of quantum mechanical energy decomposition analysis (EDA) and non-covalent interactions (NCIs) analysis to investigate hydrogen-bonding and intermolecular interactions in a series of representative 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([bmim][Tf2N]) ion pairs extracted from classical equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Thirdly, we describe the use of multipolar/polarizable AMOEBA force field to study the extraction of benzene from a gasoline model employing 1,3-dimethylimidazolium tetrafluorobrorate, [DMIM][BF4], and ethylmethylimidazolium tetrafluorobrorate, [EMIM][BF4]. Fourthly, we cover the recent improvements and new capabilities of the QM/MM code "LICHEM". Finally, we describe the use of polarizable ab initio QM/MM calculations and study the reaction mechanism of N-tert-butyloxycarbonylation of aniline in [EMIm][BF4], and ground state destabilization in uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG).
Date: May 2020
Creator: Vazquez Montelongo, Erik Antonio
Partner: UNT Libraries

Women in Wrestling Arenas: How Globalization, Socially Produced Spaces, and Commodification Impact their Portrayal and Empowerment Post Women's Revolution

Description: The Women's Revolution in 2015 has led to a drastic shift in the ways women are portrayed in professional wrestling. The Women's Revolution came as a result of the social unrest over the lack of time women were receiving on the televised shows. Where women's storylines had centered on their sexuality, they are now presented as equal to their male counterparts after the Women's Revolution. Through an exploration of concepts in globalization, commodification, and socially produced spaces, this research seeks to understand and contextualize the Women's Revolution, the degree to which the portrayed women's equality has been achieved, and the resulting impacts of the female superstars overall. I argue that that this "equality" has been achieved through inscribing the traditionally masculine qualities of wrestling to women, has resulted in an unequal distribution of opportunities to particular female superstars rather than equality for all women on the shows, and that phallocentric objectification of the female superstars still occurs in certain aspects of professional wrestling.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2022.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Kohlmeyer, Collin
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Administration of Unemployment Relief by the State of Texas during the Great Depression, 1929-1941

Description: During the Great Depression, for the first time in its history, the federal government provided relief to the unemployed and destitute through myriad New Deal agencies. This dissertation examines how "general relief" (direct or "make-work") from federal programs—primarily the Emergency Relief and Construction Act (ERCA) and Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA)—was acquired and administered by the government of Texas through state administrative agencies. These agencies included the Chambers of Commerce (1932-1933), Unofficial Texas Relief Commission (1933), Texas Rehabilitation and Relief Commission (1933), Official Texas Relief Commission (1933-1934), Texas Relief Commission Division of the State Board of Control (1934), and the Department of Public Welfare (1939). Overall, the effective administration of general relief in the Lone Star State was undermined by a political ideology that persisted from, and was embodied by, the "Redeemer" Constitution of 1876.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2022.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Park, David B
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Ecological Importance and Population Structure of Magellanic Woodpeckers (Campephilus magellanicus) in the World's Southernmost Forests

Description: The Magellanic woodpecker (Campephilus magellanicus), the largest woodpecker in Central and South America, is declining throughout its range. Notably, limited research has been conducted on the Campephilus genus, especially for island populations. Mostly during austral summers 2015-2017, I explored the ecological importance and population structure of Magellanic woodpeckers on Navarino Island, Chile (55°04′S, 67°40′W). First, I assessed how coleopteran larval density and distribution within trees may influence Magellanic woodpecker foraging behavior. Second, I designed an experiment to determine which of three detection methods would best elicit a woodpecker detection. Third, I conducted a population genetics study to elucidate trends within and among Magellanic woodpecker populations to better inform management decisions. I identified two coleopteran species: one lucanid (Erichius femoralis) and one cerambycid (Microplophorus magellanicus) within two lenga (Nothofagus pumilio) trees foraged on by Magellanic woodpeckers. Maximum woodpecker excavation depths were 71-90 mm; most larval gallery depths were 51-70 mm. The drumming device most effectively influenced the likelihood of a woodpecker detection. The odds of a woodpecker responding were 2.14 times more likely than responding to either a playback or control. On Navarino Island, I observed a pattern of isolation by distance among sampled woodpeckers, slight female sex-biased dispersal, and family groups likely consisted of nuclear families with partner replacement. Genetic diversity estimates were lower for Navarino woodpeckers than for mainland populations. Future research should build upon these results to better understand Magellanic woodpecker life history characteristics and its role in the ecosystem.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Wynia, Amy Lynn
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

When Women Swipe Right and Men Swipe Left: An Exploration of the Online Dating Preferences and Desirability of African American Women

Description: The purpose of this research study was to conduct an exploration of the dating preferences of African American women and U.S. men between the ages of 30-74 years old. This research focuses on the dating preferences and desirability of African American women and if they are influential on the high unmarried rates of African American women. A weighted stratified sampling of 2,800 personal advertisements of African American, Asian, Latino and White men and women from Match.com were collected to conduct the research. The five research hypotheses of this study were tested using frequency and percentage distribution, logistic regression and cross-tabulation models. The findings partially support the hypotheses African American women are more likely to prefer a mate with a bachelor's degree or higher and African American women are more likely to prefer a mate of the same race compared to U.S. women of other races. The findings also suggested non-African American men are less likely to have an interest in dating African American women and non-African American men, who are interested in dating African American women, are less likely to prefer women with a bachelor's degree or higher or a more socially desirable body type.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Ford, Stacey L
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Serpent Symbol in Tradition: A Study of Traditional Serpent and Dragon Symbolism, Based in Part Upon the Concepts and Observations of Rene Guenon, Mircea Eliade, and Various Other Relevant Researchers

Description: Serpent and dragon symbolism are ubiquitous in the art and mythology of premodern cultures around the world. Over the centuries, conflicting hypotheses have been proposed to interpret this symbolism which, while illuminating, have proved insufficient to the task of revealing a singular meaning for the vast majority of examples. In this dissertation I argue that, in what the symbolist Rene Guenon and the historian of religions Mircea Eliade have called ‘traditional' or ‘archaic' societies, the serpent/dragon transculturally symbolizes what I term ‘matter,' a state of being that is constituted by the perception of the physical world as ‘chaotic' in comparison to what traditional peoples believed to be the ‘higher' meta-physical source of the physical world or ‘nature.' What is called ‘nature,' I argue, is also considered in ‘Tradition' to be a perception of, from a certain state of consciousness, that aspect of existence that is called samsara in the Hindu philosophy of Vedanta, which Guenon equivalently describes, from a broadly traditional perspective in The Symbolism of the Cross, as "the indefinite series of cycles of manifestation." ‘Chaos,' according to Eliade in The Sacred and the Profane, is "the amorphous and virtual…everything that has not yet acquired a ‘form.'" The following elements have been useful in discerning the specified meaning of the serpent/dragon symbol: 1) Guenon's interpretation of the terminology of the ‘Hindu Doctrines,' as well as his interpretation of the ‘language' of traditional symbolism and the metaphysics that underlies it; 2) Eliade's interpretation of ‘traditional'/‘archaic' societies by means of his concepts of ‘chaos,' ‘creation,' Axis Mundi (‘World Axis'), and ‘Sacred and Profane'; and 3) the insights of various other researchers of serpent/dragon symbolism. Beyond purporting to resolve some of the mystery of the ancient and varied symbolism of the serpent/dragon, my dissertation strives, to a lesser degree, to serve two …
Date: May 2020
Creator: Dailey, Charles William
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Effects of Leadership Development on Student Retention in STEM

Description: The Science Teaching and Research (STAR) Leadership Program at Austin College was designed to intentionally include leadership development into the science curriculum and provides an opportunity to determine the effects of student leadership development on the retention of students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). This dissertation used a quasi-experimental design to determine: 1) if STEM retention can be explained though the inclusion of leadership development into the curriculum; 2) if there is a difference between Austin College students who choose a STEM major compared to students who do not; and 3) if there is a difference between Austin College students who complete a STEM degree compared to students who do not. Census data were collected on 2,137 students who enrolled in STEM courses beginning in the fall of 2008 through the spring of 2017, and factors affecting retention were compared across three 3-year time periods that spanned before the program was initiated through wider implementation. A logistic regression showed that there was no significant positive association between leadership development and STEM retention when taking into account other pre-college and demographic factors that have been linked to retention in the literature. However, a one-way ANOVA showed that the academic factors significantly decreased as the STAR program progressed. Further studies are required to understand student benefits associated with the current program.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Smith, Caleb Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries

"Mortal Ghosts"

Description: Collection of poems.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2022.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Vesely, Garrett
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Importance of Authenticity of Atmospheric Theming to Revisit Intention of Food and Beverage Venues in Theme Parks

Description: Atmospheric theming is the use of the sensory experience in connection to a theme. The purpose of this research is to examine the effects of atmospherics with theming and their effects on customer behavior in food and beverage operations of a theme park. The official research questions developed for this study include: Does the impact of the authenticity of atmospheric theming influence an effect on revisit intention? Does the type of theme (land's theme or venue's theme) influence the effect of visitor revisit intention? These questions guided the current research in previously non-evaluated fields of study. This study used the Mehrabian–Russel (M-R) model to create a new research model. In the current study, atmospheric theming was the stimuli, emotional value was the emotional response, and visitor revisit intentions was the behavioral intention. Restaurant image was added to the model to obtain a cognitive reason.The results from the multiple regression indicated that all hypotheses were accepted. Restaurant image had a positive influence on both authenticity variables, and both authenticity variables had a positive influence on emotional value. Finally, emotional value was found to have a positive influence on revisit intention. These results indicated that atmospheric theming influenced revisit intention through emotional value. Furthermore, the results indicated that when it comes to the different types of themes within a venue, as indicated in the second research question, the venue's theme has a stronger influence on the emotional value than the land's theme.
This item is restricted from view until December 1, 2020.
Date: May 2020
Creator: O'Dell, Billy Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries

Passing as Gray: Texas Confederate Soldiers' Body Servants and the Exploitation of Civil War Memory

Description: This dissertation is an examination of the interactions of enslaved body servants with their Texas Confederate masters from the American Civil War through the early twentieth century. The seven chapters of this study follows the story of these individuals from the fires of the Civil War, through the turbulence of Reconstruction in Texas, the codification of "Lost Cause" memory in the American South, and the exploitation of that memory by both former body servants and their ex-Confederate counterparts. This study demonstrates that the primary experience of blacks in the Confederate service was not as soldiers, but as enslaved laborers and body servants. Body servants, or camp slaves, were physically and in some cases emotionally close to their enslavers in this war-time environment and played an important part in Confederate logistics and camp life. As freed peoples after the war, former body servants found ways to use the bonds forged during the war and the flawed ideas of Lost Cause memory as a means to navigate the brutal realities of life in post-Civil War Texas. By manipulating white conceptions of former body servants as "black Confederates," some African Americans effectively "passed as gray," an act that earned money, social recognition, and a semblance of security denied to African Americans that did not have any association to former Confederates. This study further reorients how scholars in the twenty-first century examine the myth of the "black Confederate" from simply a lie propagated by whites to validate their memory of the Civil War to a lens that can reveal yet another avenue through which dauntless African Americans used to survive, and in some cases thrive, in the depths of Jim Crow rule in the American South.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2022.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Elliott, Brian Alexander
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Student Experiences, Struggles, and Supports in an Alternative School Setting

Description: Experiences of shame, such as feelings of failure, scorn, ridicule, and embarrassment, all impact a student's successful mastery of academic skills. To identify and understand the shame experiences that impact a student's success, as told from the student's perspective, and determine which factors contribute most to student success, the lenses of the shame resiliency theory and self-determination theory were utilized. This phenomenological qualitative research study explored the struggles associated with shame that students who attended and graduated from a school-of-choice alternative school experienced. In addition, it examined the factors, experiences, and/or constructs related to social and emotional well-being and resiliency that students who attended and graduated from a school-of-choice alternative school identified as most salient regarding their ability to progress through their secondary school years, achieve educational success, and ultimately, graduate from high school. The results of this study add to the body of evidence that supports a shift in the education program from a focus on assessment to SE support for the whole child. Addressing students' academic needs are but one piece of the puzzle. Meeting their social and emotional needs may, however, be even more important, both in the short-term and the long-term for all students, regardless of the types of schools they attend.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Hopkins, Lindsey Y
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Benjamin Britten's Neglected "Gemini Variations," Op. 73 and Its Place in the Chamber Music Repertoire

Description: In 1964, Benjamin Britten met the multi-instrumentalist twins Zoltán and Gábor Jeney while traveling in Budapest. At their behest, Britten composed Gemini Variations: Twelve Variations and Fugue on an Epigram by Kodály, a work which exploited the brothers' abilities on multiple instruments: Zoltán on flute and piano, and Gábor on violin and piano. In foreseeing the difficulties of programming this work, Britten simultaneously arranged a version for four players: flute, violin, and four-hand piano, eliminating the need for switching instruments. Despite this arrangement, as well as a very public and highly anticipated premiere at the Aldeburgh Festival in 1965, Gemini Variations has remained neglected by performers and scholars alike. This document serves to 1) promote a work that can justifiably be considered as part of the chamber music repertoire involving flute; 2) advocate for its musical merit and appropriateness for chamber music concerts made up of more traditional groups of players; 3) compare the two-player and four-player versions Britten wrote; and 4) explore the likely reasons why a piece by one of the most celebrated composers of the twentieth century has remained largely ignored for over fifty years.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Gibb, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries

Collected Stories

Description: A collection of short fiction stories that fixate on the role of the strange and the imagined.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2022.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Flannery, Brendan Conor
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Transgender in India: A Semiotic and Reception Analysis of Bollywood Movies

Description: The transgender community in India, commonly known as hijras, consists of people who were born as males but address themselves as females. They have been considered as the third gender in India for millennia and have had specific religious and sociocultural values and roles, but are forced to live in shadows in this day and age. Isolation of this community is also reflected in the way transgender characters are represented in Indian entertainment media. The study analyses two transgender themed films semiotically and the audience reception of those representations by 20 members of the transgender community. Semiotics is a helpful tool to understand the ways signs communicate ideas to viewers. This study applies syntagmatic and paradigmatic analyses to understand how images are used to represent and relay information to the audience. Reception theory along with double colonization has been incorporated in this study to analyse the ways in which the transgender community interprets the representations in entertainment media.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Shewade, Ruchi Ravi
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Power of Choice: An Examination of a Hybrid Recess/Tutorial Program at a Suburban High School in the Southwestern United States

Description: A suburban district in the southwestern region of the United States created a choice-based program in which students have the opportunity to address their social, emotional, and academic needs through a mid-day period where they have the ability to attend tutorials or engage in a variety of club and social activities. Each day, students choose the activity that best serves their needs, be those academic, social, or emotional. In order to determine students' attitudes, opinions, and uses of the program in an effort to improve its effectiveness for student success, this qualitative study was planned to respond to the research questions: (1) how do students spend the emPower period? and (2) what are students' thoughts, attitudes, and opinions with regards to emPower? The research began by examining student responses to a previous principal survey asking their opinions on the program. Following the analysis of the survey, focus group sessions of five students from each high school grade were held to discuss student perceptions, choices, and uses of the program. The discussions were audiotaped and transcribed. Thematic data analysis resulted in themes of stress, social life, environment, regulations, choice and tutorials. Findings included a continuum of maturity evident with students' choices as they progressed in grade level; enhanced student decision making and self-reflection; cultivating positive student-teacher relationships. Student suggestions for the program involved extending the time length of the period, teaching younger students to use the program effectively, and updating the way the advisory class is taught to be more beneficial to students.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2021.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Woodard, Chrystal Starnes
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Spatial Decision Support System to Dynamically Compute and Map Neighborhood Indices

Description: Neighborhoods are organic entities that are in a state of constant change and are driven by the specific context of the problem being investigated. The subsequent lack of consensus on a universal geographic definition for what constitutes a neighborhood can lead to biased interpretations of relationships between human activities and place. Further, while existing geographical information system software allows users to combine a range of geographic objects to generate regional units of analyses, their design does not explicitly assess how changing patterns, such as populations, impact the data expressed within them. This research develops an exploratory geographical information system framework that allows users to dynamically delineate neighborhoods based on user-specified characteristics. These include socioeconomic and similar measurements of neighborhood classification from information obtained from secondary data sources, including parcel data, land use/land cover information, and attribute data provided by the United States Postal Service. The proposed methodology creates custom geographies from readily available tract data obtained from various federal and state data repositories to produce indices. By allowing the user to dynamically weigh the combinations of variables used to define their neighborhood, this thesis introduces a solution to a common analytical problem in the discipline.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2022.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Barnett, Melissa Marie
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Vocal Pedagogy of the Behnke Family: The Behnke Method

Description: Emil Behnke was a highly esteemed vocal pedagogue of the late nineteenth century. Perhaps rare for the time, the art and science of teaching vocal methods of speech and singing was a Behnke family business, one that Emil shared with his wife and daughter, who were both named Kate. Indeed, Emil's daughter, Kate Emil Behnke, was equally regarded and valued in the field of vocal pedagogy, carrying her father's teachings into the twentieth century. Meanwhile, the elder Kate Behnke, wife to Emil and mother to Kate Emil, was responsible for administering and building upon her husband's innovative methods of speech therapy, establishing her own reputation as a speech healer. The Behnke family published no less than fourteen books, cumulatively. Largely forgotten today, the purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive overview of the biography and the pedagogical methods and works of the Behnke family, and to contextualize these methods within the framework of trusted vocal pedagogy, both historic and current.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Stapleton, Megan Leigh
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Too Important to Democratize: Lessons from the Arab Spring

Description: While the Arab Spring has resulted in numerous different political outcomes across the Arab world, conventional theories of democratization are lacking in explaining these divergent outcomes. Developing a theory of democratization, strategic importance and external intervention, I examine the relationship between national strategic importance and democratization. I argue that strategically important states will be targeted by external actors in attempts to stifle or thwart democracy because democracy may upset the status quo that foreign actors benefit from. I do not find support for the hypothesis that strategic importance and democratization share a general negative relationship, however, I find moderate support that strategic importance is related to the timing of regime breakdown, democratic breakdown and democratic transition. Furthermore, in examining the cases of Bahrain, Egypt, Tunisia and Libya, I highlight key moments of external intervention and influence that impacted the democratization attempts of each case.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Lookabaugh, Brian Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Flute Music of Cristóbal Halffter: His Roots in Spanish Tradition and Place in the Avant-Garde Generación del 51

Description: Cristóbal Halffter, born in 1930, established himself as an important figure in Spanish avant-garde composition in the middle of the twentieth-century. As one of the prominent leaders of the Generación del 51, he helped establish modernity in music as a part of Spain's identity. His compositional style mixing tradition with the avant-garde was built on the success and breakthrough of Manuel de Falla, a composer with close ties to Halffter's family and served as a 'father figure' to the Generación del 51. This study begins with a discussion on Falla's work and reception, as he lay the groundwork for modernism in Spanish music. Further, discussion on Halffter's background and compositional periods, from his nationalist approach in the 1950s to his embrace of the avant-garde in the 1960s and beyond exemplifies Halffter's prominent role in shaping Spanish modernity. This research then sheds light on previously unexplored solo flute works Debla [Solo VI] for Flute and Studie II [Solo III] for Flute by Halffter. Provided is insight to their respective influences (the Spanish debla and the Fibonacci sequence), analysis of each work, and a discussion on their similarities and differences. By taking an informative approach prior to analysis and performance suggestions, readers will gain insight to Halffter's Spanish roots as they relate to nationalism and the avant-garde, his affiliation with the Generación del 51, and his compositional style.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Godoy Jr., Martin
Partner: UNT Libraries
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