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open access

Navigating the Waters

Description: My current work investigates visual meditations on water and its connection to the human experience. Through observation and reflection, my process allows me to make associative connections with water’s powerful metaphorical qualities. Water’s multiplicity of meaning is vast. It is a complex force of nature that begs to be explored through various modes of thinking. Mindfulness combined with the act of discovery and adaptation allows my imagery to evolve organically. Working between drawing and printmaking, I create variable series of artworks, that oscillates between mimicry and abstraction as a contemplation of our human relationship and natural forces.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Escobedo, Aunna
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
open access

Skin Deep

Description: With this work, I investigate the mental and physical toll of the past and the dissonance that often occurs as we age through the use of experimental cameraless techniques. By placing photographic materials directly against my skin during performative acts of self-care, I document my body as I reflect on the damage it suffered as a result of my childhood as a competitive gymnast, which is being exacerbated by the effects of age and time. The resulting photographs are a poetic self-reflection on my physical form that embodies my struggle to understand and accept my deteriorating body.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Gerhart, Stephanie
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
open access

Visceral Reflections

Description: I am an interdisciplinary artist whose work bridges mental health, body dysmorphia, and the visual arts together through sculptures, paintings, performances, and large installations. I work with traditional and nontraditional materials through a manual and digital process to physically represent my realities of living with body dysmorphic disorder. I use padding, paper, and other fibrous objects as metaphors for the flesh and manipulate these materials in numerous ways to create exaggerations of the body.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Hoskins, Heather
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Brachaid

Description: Brachaid is a collection of photographs that explore the blindness of our perspective that is informed by images. By photographing peripheral landscapes like wastewater processing facilities, the edges of temporary streams, and stormwater basins, the project uses the landscape and its perceived neutrality to foreground how the production of images constructs our perception. The work in Brachaid emphasizes the production of images, from subject and framing choices to the use of imaging software, to demonstrate that such production is regularly and radically obscured in most of the images we consume, and that this same structure exists in our lived reality.
Access: Restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Evans, Chris Wright
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
open access

A Narrative Rewritten

Description: In A Narrative Rewritten, I explore two distinct periods of my past. One group of work deals with the emotional effects of trauma I experienced as a child during years of practicing ballet. The other celebrates a pivotal moment of spiritual awakening that gave me the strength to confront internal falsehoods I previously developed. I paint from observation, to engage with my subject and to ground myself in the present moment. In my oil paintings, I paint representationally, while delving in to the spectrum of abstraction. I use imagery symbolically from ballet and boxing to represent a shift from inadequacy to empowerment.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Aaron, Hannah
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
open access

Heeding the Underbelly

Description: Black’s work presents The Ubiquitous, an entity that propagates into subhuman beings that ravage the deserts in search of sacrificial circles or homing beacons. Their physical nature is heavily influenced by: Languid, liquid human body language; the otherworldly visage and tenacity of plant life; the heaving monstrosity of mountains and rock formations; and the joyous allegory of movie monsters, puppets, and pulp fantasy. The Ubiquitous is explored in Black’s whimsical writings and intensive drawings which are characterized by her mark’s immediacy; and her work seeks to understand this Being’s purpose, function, and correlation to her own life..
Date: May 2020
Creator: Black, Jordan
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
open access

Lucky You

Description: Belief is our acceptance of an optimal truth. We embed a belief into the things in our life that give us comfort or strength. Whether they are recognizable in popular culture or are our own private object, their value shifts to what we need them to be. My current work is inspired by multi-cultural historic luck or from my own practice of object collection. They are physical objects that are representative of ritual or ones that “bring” luck. The objects are primarily wearable jewelry, although I have included the pocket as a location of wearability. Regardless of how or where they are worn, they are meant to be valued by the wearer in some capacity.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Dessoye, Caron
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
open access

Floating Life

Description: Photography, as a way of recording, is often high-definition and highly descriptive. Therefore, photography has a close relationship with visual perception. In my soft and abstract photographic images, the particularity of time and place is deliberately diluted, and the traditional objects in the photographic images are eliminated to challenge the viewer to locate themselves in relation to the photographs. The ambiguity of the photograph stimulates the viewer's self-consciousness to the greatest extent, while also spurring profound examination of the particular ways one expects photographs to affect them.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Ning, Siyu
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
open access

Of My Own Making

Description: As we travel through life, we lose pieces of ourselves. It’s inevitable. Yet we are more than the sum of our parts. These pieces can be cast aside, lost to the wind or imply left behind. They can also be stitched back together, forming a patchwork quilt of sorts. The world is constantly changing, and now more than ever we live in a time of uncertainty. So, I feel the need to stitch together my reality. I am a Maker, and I choose to make a reflection of the world I want to inhabit; a world of my own making.
Date: May 2020
Creator: O’Dwyer, Traci
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
open access

Fractured Terrains

Description: Since my youth in Ukraine, I have been inspired by the first cosmonaut, Yuri Gagarin, who went to outer space in April 1961. Since then I have been imagining the fragments of an unknown space that is divided into a variety of different felt locations. I am interested in envisioning fractured terrains, where the intrusion of sharp elements interact with a soft transparent and atmospheric space. I want to create a sense of discord as a metaphorical reflection on the absurd, political situation in Ukraine where I am originally from. For me, navigating or transitioning from one imaginary space to another through the act of making painting feels equivalent to experiencing a new place for the first time.
Date: May 2020
Creator: Vasyutynska, Laura
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Association of Trainee Psychotherapist Competency and Client Outcomes

Description: Client outcomes in psychology training clinics have been shown to be generally worse than other outpatient settings. Although this finding has been repeatedly demonstrated, no consensus of cause has emerged in the literature. One possible explanation of such findings may relate to psychotherapist effects, a historically neglected variable that has received increased attention in more recent literature. Among psychotherapist effects researched, competency has emerged as a compelling factor worthy of more research. Given that most growth in competence occurs during graduate training, investigating the relationship between competency and client outcome offers great potential benefit for informing optimal training, nature of client symptom improvement, and a more accurate depiction of differences in psychotherapist effects across training and non-training settings. The purpose of this study was to explore the trajectory of competence development during doctoral training in health services psychology and to investigate the association of trainee competency to the psychotherapy outcomes evidenced by their clients. Practicum evaluations of 36 trainees and outcome data (using the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2) from 244 adult clients were included in analyses. Results of the study suggest there is a positive relationship between cumulative semesters of training and competency scores (rs[118]= .34, p < .001). Notably, there was no significant difference in psychotherapy outcome between low and high trainee competence. The results of the current study, relevant literature and limitations are discussed. Suggestions for future research are proposed.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2022.
Date: August 2020
Creator: Dziurzynski, Kristan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Augmented Reality Intention in Social Networking and Retail Apps

Description: This dissertation contributes to IS research by explaining user intentions while using AR features in mobile social networking and retail app contexts. It consists of three essays, which use partial least squares modeling to analyze different consumer behavior models. The first essay examines the influence of quality, human, and environmental factors on AR reuse intention in a mobile social networking context. The second essay introduces position relevance, a new construct essential to AR research in e-commerce, and it looks at the influence of this construct and app involvement on user purchase intention, while using view-in-room features on mobile retail apps. The third essay examines the influence of service quality and visual quality on recommendation intention of mobile retail apps while using view-in-room features compared to shopping without using these AR features.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2022.
Date: August 2020
Creator: David, Alsius
Partner: UNT Libraries

Faculty of Color Mentorship Experiences in Counselor Education

Description: Professional counseling associations and ethical accrediting bodies mandate that counseling programs, counselor educators, and leaders in the counseling field uphold a commitment to the recruitment, employment, and retention of ethnically and culturally diverse faculty. Despite written standards and growth in the profession, faculty of color in counselor education programs continue to be significantly underrepresented at the assistant professor, associate professor, and full professor ranks. Additionally, the overall percentage of faculty of color decreases as academic rank increases, which suggests issues related to retention and promotion. Mentorship has been recommended as an important and necessary strategy to retain and promote historically marginalized people. However, little is known about how mentoring is used as a retention strategy for faculty of color in counselor education. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the perspectives of faculty of color in counselor education programs accredited by CACREP, and their perception of mentorship, retention, and promotion. The primary researcher utilized a social constructivism paradigm, transcendental phenomenological approach, and responsive interviewing approach to semi-structured interviews. Fifteen participants employed at CACREP-accredited universities across the U.S. participated in this study. Four major themes were identified: perception of cultural climate, structural elements of mentorship, perceptions of mentorship experiences, and protective strategies to navigating academe. Implications for counselor education programs and future mentorship models along with recommendations for future research are provided.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2022.
Date: August 2020
Creator: Oller, Marianna Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Marshall System in World War II, Myth and Reality: Six American Commanders Who Failed

Description: This is an analysis of the U.S. Army's personnel decisions in the Second World War. Specifically, it considers the U.S. Army Chief of Staff George C. Marshall's appointment of generals to combat command, and his reasons for relieving some generals while leaving others in place after underperformance. Many historians and contemporaries of Marshall, including General Omar N. Bradley, have commented on Marshall's ability to select brilliant, capable general officers for combat command in the war. However, in addition to solid performers like J. Lawton Collins, Lucian Truscott, and George S. Patton, Marshall, together with Dwight D. Eisenhower and Lesley J. McNair, often selected sub-par commanders who significantly underperformed on the battlefield. These generals' tactical and operational decisions frequently led to unnecessary casualties, and ultimately prolonged the war. The work considers six case studies: Lloyd Fredendall at Kasserine Pass, Mark Clark during the Italian campaign, John Lucas at Anzio, Omar Bradley at the Falaise Gap, Courtney Hodges at the Hürtgen Forest, and Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr. at Okinawa. Personal connections and patronage played strong roles in these generals' command appointments, and often trumped practical considerations like command experience. While their superiors ultimately relieved corps commanders Fredendall and Lucas, field army and army group commanders Clark, Hodges, and Bradley retained command of their units, (Buckner died from combat wounds on Okinawa). Personal connections also strongly influenced the decision to retain the field army and army group commanders in their commands.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2022.
Date: August 2020
Creator: Carlson, Cody King
Partner: UNT Libraries

Three Essays on the Effects of Executives' Informal Networks on Shareholder Value, Financial and Tax Reporting Outcomes

Description: Prior literature suggests that CEOs capitalize on their position within the hierarchy of all business executives, resulting in various – both positive and negative – firm outcomes. Using a novel data set on golf outings to measure the quality of a CEO's informal (vs. formal) network, as measured by the CEO's network centrality, this study examines whether well-connected CEOs generate private gains through insider trades. Results suggest that, among golfing CEOs, CEOs with higher quality informal networks generate significantly higher insider trading profits on sales of their firms' stock, consistent with more famous, powerful, and influential CEOs possessing superior information. The paper continues by delineating a channel through which private information flow to network participants by documenting significantly different golf patterns of CEOs during the two weeks before material firm events become public while showing that CEOs generate noticeably higher insider trading profits from stock trades executed during the two weeks following these golf outings. This study highlights a setting in which shareholders are at risk of wealth transfer and illustrates the potential limitations of regulation concerning insider trading.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2022.
Date: August 2020
Creator: Klaus, Jan Philipp
Partner: UNT Libraries

"Just Ask: A Memoir of My Father"

Description: In this memoir, I use the elements and conventions of creative nonfiction to examine particular strands of my experience for significance. Initiated as an inquiry into my father's suicide, this book quickly shifted focus, re-centering around my own development as an individual, a woman, and a writer. Both my father's suicide and the subsequent birth of my daughter serve as focal points for this inquiry, which I use to articulate and explore questions related to identity development, male-female relationships and gender roles, female sexuality, mental illness, trauma, loss, grief, and the inheritance of intergenerational traumas. In places, my investigation also broadens to consider the social, economic, and cultural contexts in which my story, and my family's story, have taken place. My goal in writing this book was to reclaim something of value from a series of personal and familial tragedies and triumphs. I believe that the act of using tragedy as raw material for a new creation is in itself an act of hope. By bearing witness—both to the events that have occurred, and to my personal experience of these events—I see myself as contributing to a larger human project. Every contribution to this project, whether technological innovation or philosophical revelation, shares a common goal: that of counterbalancing the brevity of our physical lives with the richness of our shared human experience.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2022.
Date: August 2020
Creator: Jones, Allyson L
Partner: UNT Libraries

Childhood Emotional Maltreatment and the Self: Examining the Roles of Attachment, Affect, and Dissociation in Psychological Functioning

Description: Childhood maltreatment by a caregiver can occur in many forms, ranging from overt abuse to more subtle neglect. Amidst a primary focus on the outcome of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), less research attention has been given to understanding the impact of maltreatment on one's developing sense of self, internal working model (IWM) of relationships, and emotion regulation capacities. Difficulties experiencing, regulating, and enjoying a full range of affect are common transdiagnostic features among adult survivors of child maltreatment, who frequently display emotional reactivity (e.g., mood swings, anger) and/or disengagement (e.g., numbing, dissociation). What makes the difference between individuals who lash out in emotional outbursts, those who tend to withdraw or dissociate, and those who frequently alternate between these two affective poles? In a mixed college and community sample of 417 adults, we explored two covert forms of childhood emotional maltreatment (e.g., chronic emotional disengagement and frightened/helpless parenting) as potentially linked to adult psychological and relational functioning. Controlling for the effects of childhood physical and sexual abuse, path analysis indicated that these types of maltreatment were significantly associated with insecure attachment patterns, emotional reactivity, and dissociation in adulthood. These findings inform therapeutic work with survivors of childhood trauma, signifying the importance of thorough assessment to uncover potential psychological legacies of emotional abuse and/or neglect, which can at times be overlooked or assumed to be less pathogenic than other more obvious forms of maltreatment.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2022.
Date: August 2020
Creator: Captari, Laura
Partner: UNT Libraries

Embodied Resistance: Portraits of Urban Breastfeeding Mothers

Description: This dissertation examines how breastfeeding mothers develop distinct geographies due to the stigma, symbolic and structural violence they encounter while breastfeeding if different spaces. I utilize multiple in-depth semi-structured interviews, participant observation and photo elicitation to develop portraits of four urban mothers. My findings highlight the complexity of motherhood and demonstrate how distinct socio-spatial power dynamics situate and contextualize the experiences of breastfeeding mothers. I find that breastfeeding behaviors are influenced and maintained by broader social inequalities related to their social positions. Mothers seem caught in a paradoxical position, in which they must constantly discipline their bodies to maintain modesty while simultaneously ensuring their continued success breastfeeding. These issues are compounded by a mother's intersecting identities and their own social and cultural contexts.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2022.
Date: August 2020
Creator: Veselka-Bush, Alexandra V
Partner: UNT Libraries

Risky Business: A Sub-National Analysis of Violent Organized Crime and Foreign Direct Investment in Mexico

Description: This dissertation examines the relationship between violent organized crime and foreign direct investment (FDI) through sub-national analysis focused on the case of Mexico. The results indicate that FDI decisions vary based on the type of violent organized crime.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2022.
Date: August 2020
Creator: Bennett, Amanda White
Partner: UNT Libraries

Postmodernity and Pakistani Postmodern Literature

Description: Though scholars have discussed postmodernism in Islam and South Asia before, they tend to (i) assume Muslims as a monolithic group, bypassing the diversity of different cultures and the interaction of these cultures with indigenous practices of Islam; (ii) study postmodernity synchronically, thereby eliding histor(ies) and the possibility of multiple temporalities; and (iii) compare postmodernity in non-Western countries with Western standards, and when these countries fail this test, declare them not-yet-postmodern, or even modern. Negligible and scant discussions of postmodernity that do take place inside Pakistan, most of which are published in newspaper articles, tend to focus on Western postmodernity and its evolution and contemporary position. There is no book-length discussion of postmodernity and postmodernist literary texts from Pakistan and its curious sociopolitical blend of Indo-Muslim and Anglo-Indian influences and interaction with the Islamic political foundations of the country. This project discusses postmodernity and postmodern literature in Pakistan. I argue that, because of a different political, cultural, and literary climate, postmodernity and postmodern literature in Pakistan are distinct from their Western counterparts. Because of technological advancement and neoliberal globalization, Pakistan experiences a different kind of postmodernity resulting in the production of a different kind of postmodern literature. I trace the historical employment of postmodern literary tropes from Indo-Islamic genres, i.e. dastan, to contextualize this conversation. Then I discuss experimental works of fiction like Sultana's Dream (1908), Bina Shah's Before She Sleeps (2018), and Soniah Kamal's Unmarriageable (2019). The last chapter explores the relationship of postmodernity, postmodern politics, and Pakistani and Muslim historiographic metafictional literary texts: The Satanic Verses (1988) and A Case of Exploding Mangoes (2008). Hence, the work is regional and national, as well as comparative and transnational.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2022.
Date: August 2020
Creator: Shagufta, Iqra
Partner: UNT Libraries

Intersecting Identities and Conflict as Moderators of the Relationship between Discrimination and Mental Health in Emerging Adulthood

Description: Individuals with a minority sexual identity, such as lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals (LGB) face increased risk for stigmatization surrounding their sexual identities and subsequent psychological distress. Sexual minorities of color (SMOC) face the same difficulties faced by White sexual minorities, often compounded with stigma and discrimination linked to their racial/ethnic identities. However, because SMOC remain underrepresented in research on LGB issues, empirically-driven knowledge about these groups is lacking, even among outcomes where noted disparities exist, such as depression. Emerging adulthood may be a particularly important period for understanding effects of intersectional identities and discrimination among SMOC, who often navigate identity-related milestones and experiences independently for the first time within this developmental period. This study examined the relationships between discrimination based upon racial/ethnic and sexual intersecting identities and depression symptoms among emerging adults, as well as ways that group identity factors (ethnic identity, sexual identity, conflicts in identity allegiances) moderated this relationship. Findings indicated that experience of intersectional discrimination was strongly, positively related to depression symptoms. Ethnic identity negatively related to depression independently, but not in the regression model accounting for other variables. Identity factors were not found to statistically significantly moderate the relationship between discrimination and depression symptoms. Discussion centers on potential mechanisms involved in the relationship between intersectional discrimination and depression, and future avenues to expand work with SMOC.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2022.
Date: August 2020
Creator: Akibar, Alvin P
Partner: UNT Libraries

Implications of Performance-Based Contracting on Logistics and Supply Chain Management: A Multi-Method Approach

Description: Performance-based contracting (PBC) redefines the relationships between suppliers and buyers and differs from traditional contracting approaches with its reward/payment scheme, emphasis on the performance outcomes, increased supplier autonomy, and transfer of risk and responsibilities to suppliers. Given the 70% of life cycle costs of products/systems reside in sustainment, PBC has led to substantial improvements in availability, maintainability, reliability, and thus total cost of ownership of systems/products. Though PBC has changed the way of doing business and its presence has increased across multiple industry, private and public sectors, for profit and not-for-profit, its implications on various aspects of logistics and supply chain management have been understudied. It is important to explore and establish evidence regarding these implications through academic rigor. Therefore, this three-essay dissertation aims to give some insight regarding structural and behavioral implications of PBC using a multi-method approach. Specifically, it (1) explores the relationship between PBC and supply chain resilience (SCRES), (2) examines the supplier goal commitment (i.e., motivation) in PBC, (3) proposes a mathematical model to find optimal contract length, periodic contract price and investment that concurrently maximizing supplier profit and satisfying buyer requirements. This dissertation offers theoretical and managerial contributions as well.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2022.
Date: August 2020
Creator: Celik, Hasan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Fire Eater in the Borderlands: The Political Life of Guy Morrison Bryan, 1847-1891

Description: From 1847 to 1891, Guy Morrison Bryan was a prominent Texas politician who influenced many of the policies and events that shaped the state. Raised in his Uncle Stephen F. Austin's shadow, he was a Texas nationalist who felt responsible for promoting the interests of his state, its earliest settlers, and his family. During his nineteen years in the Texas Legislature and two years in the United States House of Representatives, he safeguarded land grants, supported internal improvements and education, and challenged northern hostility towards slavery. Convinced that abolitionists would stop at nothing to destroy the institution and Texas, he led his state's walkout of the National Democratic Convention in 1860 and became a leading proponet of secession. During the Civil War, he served as a staff officer, and his ability to mediate conflicts between local and national leaders propped up the isolated Confederate Trans-Mississippi Department. Finally as Speaker of the House, he helped oust Governor Edmund J. Davis in 1874 and "redeem" the state from Republican rule before convincing President Rutherford B. Hayes to adopt a conciliatory policy towards Texas and the South. Despite the tremendous influence Bryan wielded, scholars have largely ignored his contributions. This dissertation establishes his significance, uses his willingness to transfer national allegiances to consider nationalism--whether Texan, American, or Confederate--in the United States-Mexico Borderlands, and sheds light on neglected subjects like the role of staff officers in the Civil War.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2022.
Date: August 2020
Creator: Kelley, Ariel Leticia
Partner: UNT Libraries

After-Sales Service Contracting for Excellence in Life-Cycle Cost Management: Numerical Experiments and Systematic Review of Analytical Models

Description: This research adds to the literature and provides insight to practice via three essays that increase understanding about the applications and consequences of the two new approaches to the after-sales service governance: warranty contract and performance-based contracts. First, we attempted to enhance our knowledge of the modeling of the after-sales service process. In the first essay, the research papers with analytical models of after-sales services to present current trends, issues, and future research directions in the literature are classified. In the second essay, the effect of the warranty contract on the supplier's product quality improvement efforts in the context of capital goods is examined. Three sets of optimization models reveal that the existence of a warranty improves product quality. In the third essay, the performance-based contract is examined in the context of the warranty contract. The numerical experimentations conducted demonstrate that the performance-based contract is superior to the warranty contract in terms of the supplier's product quality efforts and the customer's total cost of after-sales services. The alignment of incentives based on the product performance tackles the issues presented in the traditional after-sales service contracting. Collectively, the three studies presented in this research expand our understanding of after-sales service contracts. Thus, the research presents managerial implications and adds to the existing body of knowledge in after-sales service research.
This item is restricted from view until September 1, 2022.
Date: August 2020
Creator: Kucuk, Carullah Y
Partner: UNT Libraries
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