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Live With It!

Description: Artist Statement from the MFA Exhibition: "I did everything right. I counted my carbs, meal prepped, and joined the high school volleyball team (For exercise of course. Heaven forbid it be for fun). All growing up, I always assumed that things would get so much easier when I stepped into adulthood. I would be comfortable in my body. Spoiler Alert, that didn’t happen. Before this starts to sound like a Judy Blume novel, let me explain. A shot of apple cider vinegar, 13 vitamins, gluten free diet, and portion control. These are all aspects of my routine that I dread but they keep me going. The concept of routine as composition really resonated with me when I first made these dietary changes. Much like repeated elements in a composition, repeated elements in my routine are what keep me going, help me function, and make me a successful composition (or human, whatever you want to call it). So why do I get bogged down by the objects that are supposed to be helping me? As a woman who has been on some sort of diet since age 12, it was difficult to come to terms with the fact that your body is dependent on another object (or twenty) to fully function. By creating functional pieces specifically made to accompany these un enjoyable aspects, I intend to make the elements of my routine that I dread, something to look forward to."
Date: May 2019
Creator: Deal, Lyndee
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

North

Description: Artist Statement from the MFA Exhibition: "My work about place attachment and the physical markers within the landscape that I consider home - Minnesota. I am interested in space and place and where those two things intersect. Using a limited color palette, metalsmithing and enameling techniques, texture, drawing, and photographs, I imbue my work with the memories of the landscape. My work is about experiencing space and is meant to bring pause -a moment of quiet and calm.."
Date: May 2019
Creator: Sawyer, Jessica
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Identifying Community Access to Veterinary Services in Southern Dallas

Description: The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals of Texas in Dallas, Texas offers an array of services and programs to residents in southern Dallas and other areas. However, interest in the state of access to veterinary care has been questioned for southern Dallas residents. In an area that faces certain compounding stressors, such as food deserts and transportation difficulties, a lack of access to veterinary care for pet owners is considered an additional possible stressor. Pet owners in southern Dallas, along with the SPCA of Texas, contemplate how to best provide medical care for local pets. In this body of work, I describe community access to veterinary services in southern Dallas. I provide a resident-centered explanation based on in-depth interviews with locals that discuss the current state of access to veterinary services while simultaneously analyzing the links between access to veterinary care, the area of southern Dallas itself, and ongoing issues with roaming and stray dogs.
Date: August 2019
Creator: O'Neill, Skye J
Partner: UNT Libraries

“Drawback”

Description: Artist Statement from the MFA Exhibition: "My work represents my personal experience with having learning differences such as Dyslexia, ADD, Auditory Processing Disorder, and others. I create pieces that reflect my thoughts, experiences, and the obstacles that I face daily. I utilize materials obtained from school desks as memories that reflect on the long periods of time we spend siting at desks in classrooms, during which we discover how to process information. To articulate these experiences, I create marks and drawings on recycled pieces of school desks. These marks indicate equations, words spelling, and information that mimics symbols from my own learning experience. Through the inclusion of hidden stones and drawings, I integrate positive associations and humor."
Date: May 2019
Creator: Thomson, Jason
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

A Comparative Study of Polyphonic Techniques in Chang-Lei Zhu's "Ballade for Solo Piano"

Description: In Chinese contemporary piano music, large-scale piano compositions featuring innovative polyphonic musical languages are rarely found. Chang-Lei Zhu's Ballade for Solo Piano represents his development of contrapuntal techniques passed on from J. S. Bach and Dmitri Shostakovich in their polyphonic works for solo keyboard or piano. This study focuses on an analysis of Zhu's Ballade as an idiosyncratic composition that makes a significant contribution to the Chinese contemporary piano music repertory. Comparative analysis is made of Zhu's Ballade and J.S. Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier Books 1 and 2, as well as Dmitri Shostakovich's 24 Preludes and Fugues for Solo Piano, Op. 87. Zhu, a living Chinese composer born in 1976, uniquely writes the twenty variations of his Ballade based on the opening theme, a single melody in ten subphrases. This research lays out the close relationship of the opening theme with twenty variations in the Ballade. This study also illustrates how Zhu is an innovative voice in Chinese contemporary piano music literature. This comparative study constitutes the first scholarly study of Zhu's Ballade. Chapter 1 is an introduction to my comparative study. In chapter 2, comparisons on selected excerpts are conducted between Zhu's Ballade and J.S. Bach's WTC, Books 1 and 2, as well as Dmitri Shostakovich's Op. 87. Taking into consideration the pedagogical function of the Ballade, this study includes how the work can be used in Zhu's Ballade in piano pedagogy as an addition in chapter 3.
Date: August 2019
Creator: Rong, Xing
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Walk

Description: Artist Statement from the MFA Exhibition: "Photography lets one be a participant as a viewer and recorder of moments in the space around them. The impulse to capture moments is felt as urgent in our current social atmosphere, and the act of image making to depict true reflection and sense of the space around us seems to have gotten lost. My intention is to observe and make imagery of temporal details I see in place. Through the process of a walk, I emphasize being present in my current space and moment. Walking is an independent, autonomous action that allows one to witness, freeze and appreciate instances in time and place. The curiosity that sets a body in motion while walking lets the observer detect variation in a situation, and to never see the same thin g twice. My work presents glimpses of individual human trace, as well as transient marks seen in nature that one might miss because of the ephemerality of place and moment. It portrays awareness of the environment and expresses interest with the unknowns of life around us. By walking to observe my surroundings, I allow myself to discover hints of others’ lives, and to contemplate the individualistic details of strangers by making imagery that expresses human touch but is devoid of human presence. I also express how time plays a part in our lives and is shown and shared through details within the natural space around us. The photographs, video and audio transport the viewer outdoors and make them a participant of the walk. By experiencing the artwork as a walk, one can actively analyze and understand the connections the work makes with the mysterious details in the world and lives of others."
Date: May 2019
Creator: Smith, Kendra
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Uncertain Ground

Description: Artist Statement from the MFA Exhibition: "In my artwork I explore my concept of home in relation to my memories growing up in the border cities of Juarez, Chihuahua and El Paso, Texas. Being a young immigrant, the only constants in my life were my sense of home and the common landscape on both sides of the border. In order to create a connection of that time and place, I investigate materials that are symbolic to my Mexican heritage and my life in the United States through the combination of traditional handwork and digital fabrication. I utilize various materials such as clay and corn husks, unifying them through the formal elements of value, line, and shape. My work becomes abstracted to symbolize the passage of time and the way in which our memories are imperfect representations of events."
Date: May 2019
Creator: Garcia, Karla
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Beauty Remains, Object Portraiture

Description: Artist Statement from the MFA Exhibition: "This body of work contains digital photographs, sculptures and wallpapers to highlight a personal journey through motherhood. Traditionally, the roles of a new mother have been handed down from generation to generation. A mother teaches her daughter how to soothe her fussy infant, her domestic responsibilities, to maintain her feminine mystique. Though many of these traditions of mouth to ear to mouth familial heritage continue, today’s society inundated women with visual language to remind them that although they can challenge the traditions and their choice to participate, those same discarded ideals of how to act or perform will continue to tug at the shoulder. "
Date: May 2019
Creator: DeSoto, Megan A.
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Critical Essay and Musical Score Accompanying the Original Music Composition, "East is East, and West is West [and Never the Twain Shall Meet]"

Description: This document accompanies and explains the concepts used in the development of the composition, East is East, and West is West, (and Never the Twain Shall Meet). The process for generation and development of much of the musical content of the composition East is East, and West is West, (and Never the Twain Shall Meet) is the use of quoted musical materials. The second process, but equally as important, for development of the composition relies heavily on the idea of parallel development of modular ensembles and how the interactions created between them by sharing instrumentation can be a tool for development, as well as a challenge to the development of each module. Each module has an influence on at least one other module and is also influenced by at least one other module, creating a puzzle of interactions that must be navigated carefully when generating each individually. Both quotation and modularity are concepts employed by other composers, so this document also briefly explains how other composers have approached these concepts in their works in order to establish a historical relationship within the canon of western classical music to East is East, and West is West, (and Never the Twain Shall Meet).
Date: August 2019
Creator: Buehler, Alex R
Partner: UNT Libraries

Who's Next?

Description: Artist Statement from the MFA Exhibition: "My work expresses personal experiences dealing with race, identity, and social critique. As an African American woman born and raised in Texas, it is common for me to be the only black face in white spaces. Being framed as the "other" has been ingrained in my existence, affecting the way I navigate through life. Throughout my time in graduate school, I have constructed my own framework of identity. Referencing history and its permanent effects on the present, my work explores the internal and external complexities of being a black woman in America today."
Date: May 2019
Creator: Barnes, Taylor
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

On/Scenity

Description: Artist Statement from the MFA Exhibition: "My work merges craft and queer iconography to reflect on my journey of is covering identity in the absence of a positive sexual role model. It has resulted in a body of work that is heavy with sex-toy imagery, and explores multiple disciplines including quilting, soft sculpture, crochet, and printmaking. Through this exploration of material, I humorously combine wholesome and taboo imagery in order to reclaim and confront sexual commodity, an industry that is heavily dominated by male pleasure. While questioning my own constructed identity, I use humor as a defense mechanism to ease into the conversation of Queer identity and the Queer female gaze."
Date: May 2019
Creator: Russell, Alyssa
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Universal Suicide Risk Screening in the Parkland Health and Hospital System: Evaluation of the Parkland Algorithm for Suicide Screening

Description: Suicide is a significant public health issue in the US. Despite national and international prioritization since 1996, little definitive progress has been made in terms of identification and intervention in cases of elevated suicide risk. Forty percent of those who died by suicide attended an emergency department within a year of death. Therefore, universal suicide risk screening in emergency departments could prove a vital component to a national suicide prevention strategy. The present study empirically evaluated the universal suicide risk screening program recently implemented at Parkland Health and Hospital System. The sample consisted of patients over 18 years of age (N=333,855; Mage=42.7, 32% male) screened as part of routine clinical care from May 4th, 2015, through November 3rd, 2015. The Parkland Algorithm for Suicide Screening (PASS) is part of a clinical decision support system for responses to Columbia - Suicide Severity Rating Scale Clinical Practice Screener (C-SSRS) items, leading to an automated clinical response via three suicide risk stratification levels: no action for no risk identified, psychiatric social worker assessment for moderate risk identified, and psychiatrist/psychologist interview for high risk identified. The present study used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, which found the PASS predicted disposition (z=30.46, p<.001, AUC=.78, CI95=.77, .81). This study also evaluated the cutpoints separating suicide risk stratification and levels of clinical response. The results supported the first cutpoint and highlighted a need for additional data to address the second cutpoint. The results of the present study suggest that the universal suicide risk screening program at Parkland Health and Hospital System is an important step toward addressing suicide prevalence in the US.
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Date: August 2019
Creator: Goans, Christian
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Smart Tale: An Examination of the Smart City Phenomena through the Lens of a Case Study

Description: This dissertation addresses research questions related to defining a smart city and the associated activities. The general research question is explored in the dissertation via the conduct of three related studies. The finding from these three investigations are presented in the results section as 3 essays that collectively examine the smart city phenomena as it has emerged within the City. Essay 1 assesses building municipal open data capability. The study proposed an Opendata Roadmap Framework to enhance the organization's dynamic capability. The results provide a valuable practical framework to help cities develop open data capability. The results also provide a comparative study or benchmark for similar initiatives with other regional cities and within the nation. Essay 2 measures the residents' understanding and beliefs about smart cities. This portion of the research used a qualitative method that included interviewing residents and city officials to understand their definition of a smart city and what they believe makes a city smart. The interviews focused on understanding resident engagement because it is an important characteristic of a smart city. The gap between the city officials and residents understanding was examined. In addition, the interviews help identify essential factors associated with smart cities like trust in government, perceived security, perceived privacy, trust in technology, and perceived monetary value. Essay 3 examines the acceptance of smart city technologies and factors that affect the adoption of such technologies. This essay uses the insights from the other two essays to propose a smart city Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) extension labelled Smart City UTAUT (SC-UTAUT). The new proposed model was tested using a survey method. The 1,786 valid responses were used to test the proposed structural equation model using Smart PLS. Results show a significant relationship between trust in technology, trust in government, perceived ...
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Date: August 2019
Creator: Habib, Abdulrahman
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Client-Counselor Encounter: Assessing Relational Depth and Motivation to Change in Substance Use Disorder Treatment

Description: This non-experimental field study examined the relationship between participant reported experiences of relational depth (RD) with their individual counselors in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment and participant reported motivation to change substance use. Participants in the study were clients enrolled in inpatient and outpatient levels of substance use disorder treatment. A total of 78 clients (aged 18-77, with mean age 35.97, 80.1% Caucasian, 11.5% African-American, 3.8% Hispanic, 1.3% Asian, 1.3% multiracial, 1.3% other) with SUDs participated in the study. Results demonstrated that treatment process variables explained approximately 42% of the variance in participant recognition scores. Specifically, substance abuse community support involvement (β = .598, rs2 = .908, p < .001) and relational depth (β = .184, rs2 = .178, p = .045) were found to be significant predictors of participant recognition of a substance use problem. From these results, one may tentatively conclude that community support and the development of relational depth in SUD treatment are valuable additions to standard SUD treatment. Extended results are described and summarized using text, tables, and figures. The study has practical and clinical implications for counselors working with clients in substance use disorder treatment particularly concerning the length of individual counseling.
Date: August 2019
Creator: Woehler, Elliott
Partner: UNT Libraries

Electrochemical Deposition of Metal Organic-Modified-Ceramic Nanoparticles to Improve Corrosion and Mechanical Properties

Description: Corrosion is an unstoppable process that occurs spontaneously in many areas of industry, specially, oil and gas industries. Therefore, the need of developing protective coating to lower the cost of corrosion is very consistent. Among different methods, electrodeposition has been a popular method since it offer many advantages such as low cost, ability to control the surface and thickness of the coating, ability to perform at low temperature and pressure, and very convenience. Ceramic nanoparticles have been widely incorporated into metal coating and used as a protective layer to improve both corrosion and hardness properties. Diazonium synthesis was used to modify cerium oxide nanoparticles by grafting with ferrocene for use in nickel nanocomposite coating. Citric acid and citrate salt were used as stabilizing ligands for yttrium oxide and praseodymium oxide nanoparticles in nickel plating solution to prevent the formation of hydroxide, thus, higher amount of nanoparticles was able to incorporate into nanocomposite coatings. These fabricated coatings were evaluate for the corrosion and mechanical properties using many different instruments and electrochemical techniques. As modified cerium oxide, stabilized yttrium oxide or praseodymium oxide added into nickel coatings. The results showed an increase in hardness and corrosion resistance leading to the overall improvement compare to pure nickel coating.
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Date: August 2019
Creator: Ngo, Ngan Kim
Partner: UNT Libraries

Optimizing Production System Maintenance Policies when Cyber Threats are Considered

Description: In a production environment, physical and cyber-related failures become unavoidable because of the complexity of highly connected manufacturing systems and a finite equipment life cycle. The main purpose of this thesis is to investigate optimal maintenance outsourcing and replacement policies in the presence of cyber-threats, as well as policies to achieve channel coordination via cost subsidization. Although well-developed maintenance outsourcing literature has addressed many advanced and trending issues such as the costs and benefits of new technology adoptions, learning effects, forgetting effects, and systems with back-up machines, no study has looked at the effect of cyber threats on connected production systems. Besides filling this gap, this thesis addresses the most common replacement policies including preventive maintenance with minimal repairs and age replacement. The advent of the Internet of Things (IoT) has enabled the creation of "smart" manufacturing systems, However the resulting connected format makes these systems potential targets for cyber-attacks. Manufacturers have to face a difficult decision as to whether they should adopt costly security technologies or let the manufacturing systems be vulnerable to cyber-threats. This study develops a model addressing this dilemma by providing some insights into the effects of cost subsidization and installation of security systems on the system profit. Our findings suggest that a manufacturer can trade off cost subsidization to gain flexibility in the maintenance decision-making process. The study also provides evidence that, for a "smart" manufacturing system, the existence of a security system guarantees at least a marginal increase in system profit. With the help of an extensive numerical study, we provide guidelines for optimizing system profit and addressing the effect of various model parameters (such as a monetary parameter, failure rate and a cyber-attack related parameter) on the value of a security system.In the second part of this thesis, we build analytical models to ...
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Date: August 2019
Creator: Ta, Anh V
Partner: UNT Libraries

Perceptions of Associates to Embrace Technology Used in Teams in the Workplace

Description: This study explores employees' desire to embrace both a legacy operating system and a new workflow engine utilized in the workplace. The goal is to better understand the partnership and relationship the users build with the technologies and how that impacts usage behavior. The research is centered on a mixed-method case study using survey and episodic interview techniques of data collection. Models and methodologies providing the foundation for this study include Venkatesh and Davis's technology acceptance model 2 (TAM 2) and Venkatesh, Morris, Davis, and Davis' unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model, coupled loosely with concepts from Brooks and Atkinson's StructurANTion Theory. A new, adapted model is created to capture and understand the anthropomorphic characteristics users apply to the technology. This study yields important information for the future theoretical frameworks as elements such as trust and control, and descriptive variables like age and tenure have not factored into existing theoretical frameworks and models. Users can often anthropomorphize technology, viewing it as part of the social team to help improve their work. Through this lens, users expect information systems to be controllable and trustworthy to respond to their needs both alone and within the function of the team.
Date: August 2019
Creator: McGowan, Michael T
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Novel Two-Stage Adaptive Method for Estimating Large Covariance and Precision Matrices

Description: Estimating large covariance and precision (inverse covariance) matrices has become increasingly important in high dimensional statistics because of its wide applications. The estimation problem is challenging not only theoretically due to the constraint of its positive definiteness, but also computationally because of the curse of dimensionality. Many types of estimators have been proposed such as thresholding under the sparsity assumption of the target matrix, banding and tapering the sample covariance matrix. However, these estimators are not always guaranteed to be positive-definite, especially, for finite samples, and the sparsity assumption is rather restrictive. We propose a novel two-stage adaptive method based on the Cholesky decomposition of a general covariance matrix. By banding the precision matrix in the first stage and adapting the estimates to the second stage estimation, we develop a computationally efficient and statistically accurate method for estimating high dimensional precision matrices. We demonstrate the finite-sample performance of the proposed method by simulations from autoregressive, moving average, and long-range dependent processes. We illustrate its wide applicability by analyzing financial data such S&P 500 index and IBM stock returns, and electric power consumption of individual households. The theoretical properties of the proposed method are also investigated within a large class of covariance matrices.
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Date: August 2019
Creator: Rajendran, Rajanikanth
Partner: UNT Libraries

Adult Attachment, Cultural Orientation and Sacrifice in Couples: A Comparison between American and Chinese Samples

Description: The present study examined the effects of adult attachment and cultural orientation on sacrifice behaviors and the corresponding emotional reactions, using a cross-cultural sample in the U.S. and China. Strain-tests protocol was utilized in this study, in which an individual (i.e., the asker) was asked to share with their romantic partner a personal goal that required a major sacrifice from their partner (i.e., the responder), and then entered a discussion to process their plan of carrying out this goal. The final sample included 115 couples from the U.S. and 99 couples from China. Results indicated that responder's attachment avoidance was negatively associated with sacrifice offered to their partners and they reported more positive emotions as a result. The interaction between attachment anxiety and nationality was significant. Specifically, in the U.S. sample, individuals with high attachment anxiety were more likely to offer sacrifice for their partners, but this effect was reversed in the Chinese sample. In addition, interdependent self-construal (ISC) was a significant moderator for the relation between attachment anxiety and sacrifice behavior. Individuals who endorsed higher ISC and higher anxious attachment were less likely to make sacrifice for their partner. Furthermore, when individual offered more sacrifice, they reported more positive emotions in general, but this effect was stronger in the Chinese sample than the U.S. sample. In addition, it was found that responders who endorsed higher ISC offered more sacrifice to their partner when asked to. These results advanced our understanding of the complex role of adult attachment in negotiating situations when partners in romantic relationships have different goals, as well as possible cultural differences in the expression of the attachment influences. The findings also highlighted the systemic perspective in understanding the roles of both partners' individual traits (i.e., attachment) and cultural values (i.e., interdependent self-construal) on their behaviors (i.e., ...
Date: August 2019
Creator: Zhu, Wenzhen
Partner: UNT Libraries

Reporting the Performance of Confidence Intervals in Statistical Simulation Studies: A Systematic Literature Review

Description: Researchers and publishing guidelines recommend reporting confidence intervals (CIs) not just along with null hypothesis significance testing (NHST), but for many other statistics such as effect sizes and reliability coefficients. Although CI and standard errors (SEs) are closely related, examining standard errors alone in simulation studies is not adequate because we do not always know if a standard error is small enough. Overly small SEs may lead to increased probability of Type-I error and CIs with lower coverage rate than expected. Statistical simulation studies generally examine the magnitude of the empirical standard error, but it is not clear if they examine the properties of confidence intervals. The present study examines confidence interval investigating and reporting practices, particularly with respect to coverage and bias as diagnostics in published statistical simulation studies across eight psychology journals using a systematic literature review. Results from this review will inform editorial policies and hopefully encourage researchers to report CIs.
Date: August 2019
Creator: Kabakci, Maside
Partner: UNT Libraries

Lithic Production at the Mesilla Phase Placitas Arroyo Site Complex Doña Ana County, New Mexico

Description: This study of lithic analysis shifts attention from typological studies to explicitly behavioral analyses, complimenting studies of both intrasite and intersite patterns of variability and change. Analysis of several assemblages from the Placitas Arroyo site complex reveals changing patterns of raw material procurement and selection, core reduction strategies, as well as tool production and discard. The most striking result thus far is the quite uniform emphasis on flake production from well-prepared cores, and the near absence of manufacture or maintenance of bifacial tools, especially projectile points. Associated with common ground stone artifacts, the flaked stone materials may well represent intensive food processing. Regardless, the technological patterns being revealed by this approach illustrate a productive new means to gain insights into changing behaviors in the Jornada Mogollon cultural tradition.
Date: August 2019
Creator: Younger, Alexandra Carla
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Survey of Solo, Chamber Music and Orchestral Excerpts Selected and Organized Pedagogically for the Intermediate Cellist

Description: The use of orchestral excerpts from standard music repertoire as a pedagogical means has been adopted by many instrumental pedagogues to train the advanced instrumentalist. This dissertation presents an innovative idea among the excerpt tradition by drawing excerpts from solo, chamber music and orchestral music to function as etudes for the intermediate level cellist. 320 music excerpts are drawn and organized under the headings of different technical categories in order to train the techniques within the context of quality music. The purpose of the dissertation is to introduce the young player to the concept that techniques and musical expression are not two separated entities, rather, techniques serve as a medium to convey the music.
Date: August 2019
Creator: Zhou, Lejing
Partner: UNT Libraries

Accuracy of Three Assessments of Sleep Timing, Duration and Efficiency Compared to a Single-Channel EEG Device

Description: Poor sleep measured across many dimensions has been linked to adverse physical and mental health outcomes including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, increased mortality, depression, and anxiety. Current research typically relies upon brief, subjective, inadequately validated methods to assess limited dimensions of sleep, resulting in inaccurate measurements and possibly faulty conclusions. Specifically, research validating objective (e.g., actigraphy) and subjective (e.g., sleep diaries, retrospective surveys) measurement methods against the gold standard of polysomnography (PSG, an overnight sleep study) is primarily limited by a) a lack of reliability based on too short (e.g., 24 or 48 hours) of an assessment period to capture night-to-night variability, b) a lack of ecological validity (e.g., full PSG in a laboratory setting), and c) a lack of generalizability due to limited or special populations (e.g., individuals with insomnia). Barriers such as prohibitive cost, extensive setup time, and personnel training requirements diminish the ability of researchers to conduct measurement comparison studies using gold standard measures like traditional PSG. These barriers can be circumvented with the use of low-cost, minimally invasive single-channel EEG devices (e.g., Zmachine), but to date few studies have employed these devices. The current study evaluated the accuracy of retrospective surveys, sleep diaries, and actigraphy compared to a single-channel EEG device for assessment of sleep timing, duration, and efficiency in participants' homes over one week using a broad community sample (N = 80). Actigraphy generally demonstrated the best agreement with Zmachine across sleep variables, followed by diary and then survey. Circadian midpoint was the most consistent across measures, followed by sleep duration and then sleep efficiency. Implications and future directions are discussed.
Date: August 2019
Creator: Dietch, Jessica R.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Global Spatial Model for Loop Pattern Fingerprints and Its Spectral Analysis

Description: The use of fingerprints for personal identification has been around for thousands of years (first established in ancient China and India). Fingerprint identification is based on two basic premises that the fingerprint is unique to an individual and the basic characteristics such as ridge pattern do not change over time. Despite extensive research, there are still mathematical challenges in characterization of fingerprints, matching and compression. We develop a new mathematical model in the spatial domain for globally modeling loop pattern fingerprints. Although it is based on the well-known AM-FM (amplitude modulation and frequency modulation) image representation, the model is constructed by a global mathematical function for the continuous phase and it provides a flexible parametric model for loop pattern fingerprints. In sharp contrast to the existing methods, we estimate spatial parameters from the spectral domain by combining the exact values of frequencies with their orientations perpendicular to the fingerprint ridge flow. In addition, to compress fingerprint images and test background Gaussian white noise, we propose a new method based on periodogram spacings. We obtain the joint pdf of these m-dependent random variables at Fourier frequencies and derive the asymptotic distribution of the test statistic.
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Date: August 2019
Creator: Wu, Di
Partner: UNT Libraries