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open access

The Treatment of the Alto Flute in Orchestral Literature

Description: This paper presents a brief history of the alto flute and discusses its use in the orchestral literature of European, Russian and American composers. Analysis of selected passage from various works determine its use as either a solo instrument, doubling or reinforcing voice, or as part of an accompanying line.
Date: May 1980
Creator: Kirkpatrick, Linda M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Exploring Turkish American Fathers: Father Involvement, Father's Perception of Maternal Gatekeeping, Competence, and Conservatism

Description: There has been an increase in the fatherhood studies with minority groups in the United States in the past decades; however, these studies rarely included Turkish American fathers. To the best of the authors knowledge, current study was the first to explore father involvement in relation to fathers' perception of mothers' gate-keeping, fathers' competence as a parent, and their cultural stance as related to conservatism among a sample of Turkish American fathers with children between the ages of 3 to 6 years (n = 103). An exploratory factor analysis was conducted to examine the factor loadings of gate-closing and gate-opening items. The results yielded a two-factor solution with one suppressed item, and two cross-loading items with factor loadings bigger than .32. A path analysis was conducted to determine whether father's competence in relation to gate-closing and gate-opening, and father's conservatism adequately described father involvement through regression paths. The results of the chi-square goodness-of-fit test were not significant, χ2(3) = 1.84, p = .607, suggesting that the model fit the data well. Father's competency significantly predicted father involvement (B = 0.56, SE = .211, p = .008). Gate-closing (B = -30.48, SE = 15.340, p = .047) and gate-opening (B = 1.20, SE = .298, p < .001) significantly predicted father involvement. Gate-closing partially mediated the relationship between father's competency and father involvement (B = 0.11, SE = .063, p = .004) while gate-opening didn't yield mediation. And finally, conservatism did not significantly predict father involvement (B = -0.09, SE = -1.11, p = .266). The results suggest that with Turkish American fathers, competency, gate-closing and gate-opening are good predictors of father involvement, while conservatism is not a good predictor in this current study.
This item is restricted from view until December 1, 2021.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Soyer, Gonca Feyza
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

"Oklahoma History"

Description: Oklahoma History is a collection of poetry that examines the speaker's relationship to and critique of her home state, Oklahoma. The poems navigate race and gender as they intersect with local histories, culture, and religion, which complicates and often contradicts what the speaker is taught through childhood, adolescence, and into adulthood. The creative portion is accompanied by a critical preface which looks at how the poems and other writings of Oklahoma poet Joy Harjo impact the author's writing.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Warren, Sarah
Partner: UNT Libraries

Exploring the Impacts of COVID-19 on Hotel Booking Intentions: An Application of the Protection Motivation Theory

Description: After the hit of the COVID-19 pandemic, the hotel industry's efforts need to focus on recovering travelers' confidence by introducing new safe and clean programs or seals. However, there is a lack of guidelines regarding which hotel safety/cleaning programs and what communication strategies are more effective when approaching guests. This study aims to address this gap by using a 2 (COVID-19 Message Type: Fear Appeals vs. Hope Appeals) × 2 (Hotel Safety/Cleaning Program Type: Internal vs. Third-Party) between-subject experiment design. Specifically, it applies the protection motivation theory in investigating the effects of different messages (hope vs. fear) along with different types of hotel safety/cleaning programs (internal vs. third-party) on guests' booking intentions. The moderating role of risk propensity was also explored. The data were collected in a public university located south of the U.S. Different ANOVA and MANOVA tests were conducted. The results suggest that hope appeal messages and hotel internal cleaning programs arouse higher booking intentions. When presenting COVID-19 related information provided by hotels, hope appeals represent a better communication strategy. In addition, the coping and threat appraisals showed to be correlated with hotel guests' booking intentions. Moreover, response efficacy was the strongest predictor with a positive correlation, whereas perceived severity was the second strongest predictor with a negative correlation. Last, risk propensity was found a significant moderator between guests' response efficacy and booking intentions. Participants under the risk-taker category reported higher booking intentions even when their self-efficacy perceptions were low.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2023.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Hernandez Calderon, Araceli
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Prestige as the Highest Ambition: Emerging Research Universities and the National Research University Fund

Description: In 2009 the Texas legislature created the National Research University Fund (NRUF), intended to encourage a select group of public doctoral universities in the state, known as emerging research universities (ERUs), to increase their institutional status related to academic research by awarding supplemental financial support for meeting specific policy metrics. Efforts to increase the research status of these universities occurred at a time when public financial support remained stagnate and overall institutional costs increased within the higher education sector. This study utilizes a theoretical approach grounded in strategic action fields and employs panel data and a difference in differences statistical technique to analyze the impact that NRUF policy has in assisting ERUs in achieving R1 status, and how this organizational change impacted access to, and the quality of, undergraduate education. Results indicate that the NRUF policy intervention was not statistically significant for any part of the study. These findings suggest that policy interventions do not matter as much as specific institutional characteristics and the overall policy environment. Enrollment and tuition revenue predicted institutional performance related to academic research and graduate education, while also assisting these institutions in maintaining undergraduate academic quality and access. These cultural and material resources at the institutional level matter, as does how the overall state field prioritizes various aspects of higher education. Given the amount of resources required of the policy, and the general lack of evidence of its positive or negative effects, these indicate that those resources would be more wisely targeted elsewhere.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Ryan, Sean Alan
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Performing Controlled Indeterminacy in Leo Brouwer's "Sonata Mitología de las Aguas No. I, para Flauta y Guitarra"

Description: Leo Brouwer's Sonata Mitología de las Aguas No. I for flute and guitar, first published in 2017, has taken its place as an important twenty-first-century addition to the flute and guitar duo repertory. I provide a brief historical context for the work, followed by preparation guides for guitar alone and duo passages. My preparation guides include exercises and rehearsal strategies, focusing on those passages of the work that include controlled indeterminacy. The study of indeterminacy in music is unusual in the pedagogy of the classical guitarist; this leaves guitarists unprepared for dealing with pieces, especially chamber works, that use improvisation or aleatoric music as a primary element. I take a multifaceted approach to facilitate the realization of the indeterminate sections of the work; this includes demonstrations of my traditional music notation transcriptions and other rehearsal strategies and the application of music performance study systems by James Thurmond and Marcel Tabuteau. This document aims to provide guidance to creating an organic, natural aesthetic in the actualization of Brouwer's groundbreaking work.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Rodriguez, Hector Javier
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Faculty Response to Academic Dishonesty in the Classroom at a Four-Year Public Institution

Description: Academic dishonesty is prevalent in institutions of higher education. Faculty are at the forefront of this issue as they are in the classroom with the students. However, faculty may be hesitant to address academic dishonesty for a myriad of reasons. The purpose of this qualitative exploratory case study was to explore how faculty members viewed their roles in addressing academic dishonesty. Study participants were 11 full-time faculty from a Southern University who had taught for at least two years and had experienced academic dishonesty in the classroom. Artifacts were also gathered from three documentary sources. Four major themes emerged from the data: (a) faculty investment in academic integrity, (b) faculty-student relationship impact on interaction, (c) personal values guiding faculty response, and (d) deterrents preventing faculty action. Several implications included the need for: (i) ongoing professional development opportunities for faculty, (ii) the creation of shared ownership and governance of academic integrity between faculty and university leadership; (iii) consistent prevention and enforcement of academic dishonesty according to university guidelines, and (iv) the creation of a partnership between the conduct office and the various faculty departments.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Smith, Laura Trahan
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

A Comparative Analysis of the Orchestral and Piano Versions of Finlandia by Jean Sibelius in Relation to His Compositional Style, 1899–1904

Description: While he was composing his important orchestral tone poem Finlandia in 1899–1900, Jean Sibelius (1865–1957) made his own piano arrangement of it. The purpose of this study is to compare the piano arrangement and orchestral version and to see further the similarities with Sibelius's other piano compositions from the same time period (1899-1904). Through this study I have found compositional patterns, which are typical for the composer and defined his composition style for piano during his "Kalevala-Romantic" phase. Sibelius's piano style was characterized as unpianistic and bulky by some. However, through my research I can show that with an analysis of certain harmonic structures, subtle use of pedal and correct voicings, his piano texture is indeed very thoughtful and transparent with a clear focus on counterpoint while remaining pianistic and comfortable to play. In order to fully understand the idiosyncrasies of the two versions of Finlandia, a detailed comparative analysis of the piano and orchestral scores is necessary. For this purpose, I primarily used the printed scores of both the piano and orchestral versions. In addition, the manuscript of the piano version of Finlandia was consulted as an important resource. From the orchestra manuscript, only one page has been found. The analysis focuses on the comparison between the textures of both versions, the score and the piano arrangement. I also applied the results of the comparison to the other scores of Sibelius's piano compositions from that time period to show his consistency in his use of the described arrangement techniques. With using the orchestration possibilities of the piano Sibelius's writing allows the instrument to stand completely on its own using all the possibilities of the piano sound while maintaining a highly pianistic texture. The goal of my research is to provide insight to understanding Sibelius's early piano style, introduce some …
Date: May 2021
Creator: Teppo, Ruusamari
Partner: UNT Libraries

Exploring Factors Affecting Public Service Motivation: An Investigation of Public Service Motivation in Saudi Arabia

Description: This research builds on social exchange theory and self-determination theory to better understand the relationships between employee engagement, demographic and personal attributes, and public service motivation (PSM). It hypothesizes that employee engagement and demographic and personal characteristics (education, income, gender, and parents working in civil service) will directly affect PSM. I also hypothesize that education, income, and gender will have an indirect effect and moderate the relationship between employee engagement and PSM. This dissertation uses a quantitative approach to investigate the hypotheses introduced with the conceptual model. This research uses structural equation modeling as a data analysis technique. Based on 704 valid questionnaires distributed to Saudi public employees in Riyadh, Jeddah, Dammam, and Assir, the analysis shows that a higher level of employee engagement will lead to a higher level of public service motivation. It also reveals that a higher level of education will lead to a higher level of PSM.; the hypothesis that income positively affects PSM is not supported. Thus, this study finds that there is no significant relationship between income and PSM. Being female is found to be negatively associated with PSM. Therefore, the hypothesis that females are lower PSM than males is supported. Parents of public employees whose parents work or have worked in civil service demonstrated a high level of PSM compared with employees whose parents do not work in civil service. Regarding the moderation hypotheses, interestingly, the analysis shows that education, gender, and income do not moderate the effect of employee engagement on public service motivation.
This item is restricted from view until December 1, 2021.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Alotaibi, Saud G.
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Object Detection for Aerial View Images: Dataset and Learning Rate

Description: In recent years, deep learning based computer vision technology has developed rapidly. This is not only due to the improvement of computing power, but also due to the emergence of high-quality datasets. The combination of object detectors and drones has great potential in the field of rescue and disaster relief. We created an image dataset specifically for vision applications on drone platforms. The dataset contains 5000 images, and each image is carefully labeled according to the PASCAL VOC standard. This specific dataset will be very important for developing deep learning algorithms for drone applications. In object detection models, loss function plays a vital role. Considering the uneven distribution of large and small objects in the dataset, we propose adjustment coefficients based on the frequencies of objects of different sizes to adjust the loss function, and finally improve the accuracy of the model.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Qi, Yunlong
Partner: UNT Libraries

"Engine Running": Essays

Description: Engine Running: Essays is a collection of creative nonfiction that explores, in parts, a persona's distancing from home and self against the backdrop of an increasingly fractured family doing the same. Through a variety of forms, the essays seek to balance themes like loss, self-discovery, and manhood in reflections on the role of childhood memory, the early revelations and experimentation of sexuality, and the carving-out of personal identity in West Texas.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2023.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Mason, Chesley Cade
Partner: UNT Libraries

Benefits of Probiotics on Mortality, Growth Performance, Physiological Condition and Gut Histomophology of Juvenile Red Drum (Sciaenops ocellatus)

Description: Results from the present study found for the first time that the use of bacterial strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium thermophilum, and Enterococcus faecium from the commercial product PrimaLac® had the potential to act as a possible probiotic for juvenile red drum. The addition of PrimaLac® probiotics [whether as a water-soluble probiotic (WSP) or in a probiotic enhanced starter feed (PESF)] reduced mortality (%M), enhanced growth rates (MW, LT, SGR, and DGR), improved feed conversion efficiencies (FCEs), and physical condition factors in the juvenile red drum. Improvement was quantified using external morphological condition indices (MCIs) and blood physiological condition indices (PCIs). Results showed a strong positive relationship between MCIs and PCIs, which suggested that probiotics treated fish were in better health (lower MCIs) with lower fasting blood glucose and lactate levels than control fish. Addition of probiotics also resulted in improved water quality (lower nitrate, nitrite, and ammonia) in the treatment tanks compared to controls. Application of PrimaLac® probiotics on the morphology and histology of three different regions of the intestine (proximal, mid-and distal) improved intestinal length (Li), mass (Mi), and digesta mass (Md). In 5μm histological sections examined for differences among treatments (probiotics vs. controls), five variables within each intestinal region were also quantified: (i) perimeter ratio (PR) between the internal perimeter (IP) of the intestinal lumen and the external perimeter (EP) of the intestine where, PR = IP/EP; (ii) width of lamina propria (wLP); (iii) thickness of the muscle layer (tM); (iv) the number of goblet cells per segments (GC); and (v) height of enterocytes (hE). Overall, Li and Mi significantly increased by 13.4 ± 1.2% and 11.8 ± 0.9%, respectively, and Md decreased by 33.2 ± 1.21% compared to controls. Significant increases in microvilli heights, PR (by 21.3 ± 1.2%), tM (by 18.4 ± 0.9%), …
This item is restricted from view until December 1, 2021.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Busby, Wren Adell
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Teacher Perceptions of Supports that Promote Computer Self-Efficacy and Transformational Digital Pedagogy in One-to-One Learning Environments

Description: Although one-to-one technology programs are rapidly expanding in secondary schools, the literature about how to effectively leverage these programs to improve teaching and learning is relatively small. Little guidance is available for school leaders attempting to improve teachers' willingness and ability to incorporate technology effectively into their instruction. The purpose of this mixed-methods case study was to discovery what supports school leaders provide to promote high levels of computer self-efficacy and transformational digital pedagogies in one-to-one learning environments. Data were collected from English language arts, Social Studies, and science teachers in three high schools in a suburban school district in northeast Texas using an online survey, eight virtual semi-structured interviews, and two virtual focus group interviews. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and deductive and inductive analysis. The findings of the study reveal most teachers perceived their ability to effectively deliver digital instruction as strong, and most were able to incorporate technology into their lessons at transformational levels. The following themes emerged from data regarding teachers' perceptions of support: shared vision, realistic and supportive climate, collaboration, encouragement, job-embedded professional learning, continuous improvement, equity, and safe, legal, and ethical use. The findings of this study serve as a foundation for understanding how school leaders can best support teachers as they attempt to integrate one-to-one technology into their lessons.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Kent, Paula J
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Decolonization of United States History: Exploring American Exceptionalism

Description: Like many institutions of high education throughout the United States, the University of North Texas requires all students to pass introductory United States History courses. While the purpose of these courses should be to create a population well versed in U.S. history and sociopolitical and economic context, the foundational textbooks utilized in these courses promote American exceptionalism and U.S. supremacy. Their omission of the complex and controversial history of the United States creates a false master narrative based on an idealized version of U.S. history. Even textbooks that include diversity continue to uphold a progressive master narrative that ignores issues of systemic racism, sexism, and homophobia. My theoretical analysis of the required textbooks, Exploring American Histories: A Survey with Sources, is applicable to all introductory U.S. history textbooks. Decolonialism, critical race, and intersectional feminism are theoretical lenses that disentangle and highlight otherwise invisible aspects of American exceptionalism and the serious consequences of the subjugation of subaltern historical narratives. This thesis applies theory with examples of how textbooks or supplemental teaching can expose foundational oppression, violence, and discrimination to teach students critical thinking and help them see connections between the past and their present.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Walsh, Leah Sydney Pearce
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

App Stole My Gayborhood? A Transforming Ethos at the Intersection of Queer Urban Life and Cyberspace(s)

Description: This thesis demonstrates a queer perspective stemming from a qualitative analysis of data gathered in interviews with LGBTQ+ people to analyze a transforming ethos of gayborhoods and queer desires. In particular, the research focuses on the interactive relationship between self-identified lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ+) participants; the cyberspace(s) of LGBTQ+ mobile-dating applications (apps); and tangible urban places. The topic of gayborhood demise and whether such places are worth saving has been debated by scholars and journalists for the last decade. The demise of gayborhoods is often thought to be a symptom of neoliberal urban processes such as gentrification within the context of the post-gay era and broader societal acceptance of homosexuality. This means the question of "if the gayborhood is worth saving" is inherently imbedded in an assumption that homosexuality is not viewed or treated as different or lesser than heterosexuality. In this imagined post-gay era, gayborhoods are declining because the dangers posed to the LGBTQ+ population are purported to no longer exist, so there is no longer a need for designated queer and/or safe places. This research destabilizes the assumptions embedded within the conception of the post-gay era by asking whether the gayborhood meets the needs and desires of contemporary queers. Alternatively, are LGBTQ+ mobile-dating apps part of gayborhood decline, and if so how? Therefore, the question of "if the gayborhood is worth saving" is not about assumed queer acceptance in greater society; rather, the question should be grounded in if the gayborhood fulfills the needs and desires of contemporary queers.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Stucky, Farrell
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

It Seems Like It's Never Going to End: The Experiences of Those Living in Damaged Dwellings Following Hurricane Sandy

Description: Where people go between evacuation and recovery remains an understudied aspect of disaster research. Whether experiencing multiple displacements, permanent displacement, or undergoing recovery in a damaged dwelling, the spatial and temporal dimensions of disaster displacement can have direct impacts on the recovery experiences of survivors. Pulling from focus group data gathered in 2017 from Hurricane Sandy survivors in New Jersey, this qualitative research focuses on the experiences of those who recovered in-situ, or within their damaged dwelling following the storm, and the various ways this non-displacement impacted their recovery. A content analysis following a grounded theory approach produced the emergent themes of the in-situ experience, including: a lack of suitable shelter, an exposure to secondary hazards, and an inability to achieve satisfactory emotional recovery. This study contributes to the growing body of literature surrounding recovery experiences, and it introduces valuable insights into the challenges that survivors face while recovering in-situ.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Wolfe, Rachel Suzanne
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Effects of Attachment Height and Rail Material of Resistance Training Sled on Trunk Lean and Jerk During Linear Acceleration Training

Description: Sprint acceleration training has been highly researched and found that resistance sleds are one of the most effective tools for maximizing training adaptations. The resistance sled is being used by many of the world leaders in athletic training but has yet to be researched for the kinetic and kinematic effects some of its key components cause. The aim of this study was to better understand the effects of the attachment height on the sled and sled rail material on the user's trunk lean and jerking effect caused by the sled. This was done because it was hypothesized that the attachment height has a direct impact on trunk lean and sled rail material has a direct impact on jerk caused by the sled. To test these assumptions, experimental and theoretical data was collected using a single subject study analyzing trunk lean and acceleration values of the sled. The results presented a significant decrease in trunk lean (more horizontal line of action) when the attachment height was raised. Additionally, no significant values were attained to support the assumption that by modifying the sled rail material, jerking effects will decrease. The results indicate that there is a direct correlation between attachment height and trunk lean. More research is needed to better understand the relationship between sled rail material and jerk.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Fitzgerald, Sean
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Impact of Including Teacher and School Characteristics on Predicting Value-Added Score Estimates

Description: Value-added models (VAMs) have become widely used in evaluating teacher accountability. The use of these models for high-stakes decisions making has been very controversial due to lack of consistency in classifying teachers as high performing or low performing. There is an abundance of research on the impact of various student level covariates on teacher value-added scores; however, less is known about the impact of teacher-level and school-level covariates. This study uses hierarchical linear modeling to examine the impact of including teacher characteristics, school characteristics, and student demographics aggregated at the school level on elementary mathematics and reading teacher value-added scores. Data for this study was collected from a large school district in north Texas. This study found that across all VAMs fitted, 32% of mathematics teachers and 37% of reading teachers changed quintile ranking for their value-added score at least once across all VAMs, while 55% and 65% of schools changed their quintile ranking of value-added scores based on mathematics and reading achievement, respectively. The results show that failing to control for aggregated student demographics has a large impact on both teacher level and school level value-added scores. Policymakers and administrators using VAM estimates in high-stakes decision-making should include teacher- and school-level covariates in their VAMs.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2023.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Allen, Lauren Elise
Partner: UNT Libraries

Francis Bacon's New Atlantis: The Quiet Revolution of Science, Religion, and Politics

Description: Francis Bacon (1561-1626) is recognized as a founder of the modern scientific project and a forerunner of the modern era of political thought. He advocated the development of an active science that would enable human beings to control nature in order to relieve man's estate. To accomplish this, Bacon argues that we must reconstruct all arts and sciences upon a more solid foundation. In reconstructing the arts and sciences, Bacon subtly changes the meaning of foundational religious, political, and scientific notions in order to better suit his project of progress. As the inheritors of his vision, turning to Bacon helps recover foundational considerations that have been forgotten as a result of his success. This dissertation approaches Bacon's thought through an analysis of his New Atlantis, a fable that envisions the completion of his project. I also turn to his other political, scientific, and religious works as appropriate to supply what is omitted in the fable. I find that although his revision of religious, scientific, and political foundations is conducted subtly they are nevertheless revolutionary, and essential for preparing the various outlooks that characterize the modern world.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2023.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Lowe, Evan M
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

At the Junction of Dissemination and Implementation: Facilitating Access to Behavior Analytic Research

Description: Research in scholarly communication is usually limited to the use and dissemination of scientific material by scholars. This excludes the transfer of knowledge from research producers to service providers. Some may argue the primary function of science is to investigate the conditions in the lab so everyday interactions with the environment are more effective and efficient. This is the underlying philosophy of the science of behavior analysis. Comprised of a basic science, an applied science and a philosophy the field of behavior analysis relies on research developments to inform effective practice. Guided by dissemination processes studied in information science, this investigation revealed the content layer in behavior analysis is primarily comprised of journal articles. Ninety four percent of the research artifacts cited in the current content layer are from journal articles. Other dissemination channels used to develop the behavior analytic content layer included scientific magazine articles, oral reports, dissertations and theses, and unpublished manuscripts. The information use environment for professionals in this field is very different than that of the scholars; most professionals do not have access to a university library. Therefore, the research producers are disseminating developments via communication channels some service providers cannot access. This investigation reveals the only dissemination channel that provides continuous access to the content layer is reaching out via informal communication; All other dissemination channels do not provide access to the entire content layer, do not provide the entire scholarly work, and/or include a barrier to access (often an associated cost). This is a concern for the field of behavior analysis as professional recommendations cannot be based on the best available evidence if the evidence is not accessible. This is a concern for the field of information science as the study of scholarly communication should not be limited to scholars alone. The process of …
Date: May 2021
Creator: Bank, Nicole L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Procurement of Smart City Technologies: Smart City or Smart Governance?

Description: This dissertation argues that the core of building smart cities is through the procurement and implementation of smart city technologies (SCTs) by either individual (i.e., smart city) or collaborative endeavors (i.e., smart governance). Given that urbanization problems (e.g., air pollution) usually spill over city boundaries, building smart cities as silos may not solve these problems. Therefore, utilizing smart governance in SCT procurement and implementation should be a better approach. Considering the potential benefits of smart governance, this dissertation addresses three overarching questions: (1) What is a smart city? (2) What is smart governance? and (3) Why do some cities choose to participate in smart governance while others do not? By developing a typology of smart governance, this dissertation categorizes three levels of smart governance based on cities' participation in cooperative procurement and implementation of SCTs. Data collected from the 2019 Smart Governance Survey confirm that the level of smart governance does vary among Texas cities. Applying transaction costs and institutional collective action (ICA) frameworks, the dissertation finds that public managers' perceptions on transaction costs and joint gains as well as cities' extant ICA mechanisms affect cities' participation in smart governance.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2023.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Tao, Jie
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Outdoor Child-Centered Play Therapy with Attention and Social-Emotional Competencies in Children

Description: Children experience a multitude of benefits in response to interactions with nature. Despite documented effects, children have increasingly spent less time outdoors over the last century and experienced higher rates of physical and emotional illnesses. Although child-centered play therapy (CCPT) is a culturally and developmentally responsive mental health treatment for children, researchers have limited study of environmental structure and materials employed in the therapeutic process of CCPT. In this study, I sought to further research on the integration of nature with CCPT by providing CCPT in an outdoor, contained playroom equipped with traditional CCPT toys and additional nature materials. Participants were 13 children in the southwestern U.S. with parent-reported attentional or self-regulation concerns (9 males, 6 females; ages 5-10, mean age M = 8.0). Parents reported participants' racial identities were 13% Black (n = 2), 13% Latinx (n = 2), 7% Turkish (n = 1), and 67% White (n = 10). Participants received 8 weeks of twice-weekly CCPT in an outdoor playroom. Results of two repeated measures ANOVAs revealed statistically significant improvement in attention on the Brown EF/A Scales and statistically significant improvement in social-emotional competencies on the SEARS-P. Results of this study illustrate the possible benefits of theoretically integrating CCPT and nature and the clinical impacts the novel approach could have on children's attention and social-emotional competencies. The study also provided insight into the viability of providing an outdoor CCPT intervention at a larger scale and some problems that may arise in creating and maintaining an outdoor playroom.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Walker, Kimberly L. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Foreign Direct Investment and Sustainable Peace During/After Civil Conflicts

Description: This dissertation examines the impact of FDI on peace in civil conflict-experienced states. While economic grievances have often been pointed out as a major cause of civil war within the literature, scholarship on post-conflict peace has focused mainly on political settlements, such as one-sided victories or power sharing, largely ignoring the importance of economic conditions. Thus, this dissertation aims to examine how FDI can affect sustainable peace in conflict-experienced states in terms of prevention of conflict recurrence and regime stability. FDI can be conducive to peace during/after civil conflicts, as it can bring capital which can be used for economic reconstruction and development in conflict-experienced states. Furthermore, this dissertation focuses on the impact of bilateral FDI. When a third party intervenes in a conflict management process and the third party has a great deal of economic interaction with the conflict experienced state, this economic interdependency will affect the third party's motivation to make the conflict-experienced state stable. It also provides third-party with greater leverage over peace efforts. Eventually, this third-party leverage will affect peace during/after civil conflicts. This dissertation is built around three interrelated empirical chapters: (1) determinants of FDI in conflict-experienced states, (2) the impact of FDI on conflict recurrence, and (3) the impact of FDI on regime stability. U.S. and Chinese FDI are used as focal cases for the analysis. This is because they have the most powerful economic and military influences in the world. As a result, this dissertation examines the impact of U.S. and Chinese FDI on peace in civil conflict-experienced states.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Jeong, Bora
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Emergence of Receptive and Expressive Language through Stimulus-Specific Consequences

Description: An important question in teaching language is, what accounts for the emergence of either receptive or expressive labels when teaching only one of them? The teaching procedures in the present study were intended to reproduce the natural development of bidirectional naming in which caregivers comment on the items a child is interacting with and children echo those vocalizations they hear. Thus, the only vocalizations presented by the researcher during teaching occurred after the learner pointed to a specific stimulus, and were specific to the stimulus being targeted. These vocalizations are referred to in this study as stimulus-specific consequences. The purpose of this research was to investigate if the stimulus-specific consequences could become discriminative stimuli for receptive labels, and lead to the emergence of expressive labels. Three studies were conducted, each with four adults. Results demonstrated that using a stimulus-specific consequence during teaching led to receptive labels for all participants, but led to the emergence of expressive labels for only four participants. In other words, bidirectional naming did not occur for the majority of participants. Factors that may improve interrelations between receptive and expressive labels were analyzed, but further evaluations are needed to account for the inconsistent demonstrations of naming.
Date: May 2021
Creator: Spurgin, Destiny
Partner: UNT Libraries
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