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JAC Audio Interview: Richard Rorty

Description: JAC interview of Richard Rorty discussing social constructionism in relation to writing, philosophy, and rhetoric.
Date: 1989
Duration: 37 minutes 17 seconds
Creator: Olson, Gary A. & Rorty, Richard
Partner: UNT Libraries

Ensemble: 1989-07-05 - Summer Spectrum

Description: A concert presented at the UNT School of Music Concert Hall.
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Date: July 5, 1989
Duration: 13 minutes 42 seconds
Creator: University of North Texas. School of Music. Department of Composition.
Partner: UNT Music Library
transcript

[Adam Nussbaum Lecture, February 28, 1989: Parts 1 and 2]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Adam Nussbaum on February 28, 1989 at 9:30AM at the UNT College of Music. It includes a lecture and performance by Adam Nussbaum, drums, interspersed with questions from the audience.
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Date: February 28, 1989
Duration: 1 hour 37 minutes 56 seconds
Creator: Nussbaum, Adam
Partner: UNT Music Library
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[Slide Hampton Lecture, February 21, 1989: Part 3]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Slide Hampton on February 21, 1989 at 2:00PM at the UNT College of Music. Includes lecture and performance by Slide Hampton, trombone, interspersed with questions from the audience.
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Date: February 21, 1989
Duration: 1 hour 14 minutes 03 seconds
Creator: Hampton, Slide
Partner: UNT Music Library
transcript

[Adam Nussbaum Lecture, February 28, 1989: Part 3]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Adam Nussbaum on February 28, 1989 at 2:00PM at the UNT College of Music. It includes a lecture and performance by Adam Nussbaum, drums, interspersed with questions from the audience.
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Date: February 28, 1989
Duration: 1 hour 14 minutes 03 seconds
Creator: Nussbaum, Adam
Partner: UNT Music Library
transcript

[Jamey Aebersold Lecture, April 10, 1989: Parts 1 and 2]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Jamey Aebersold on April 25, 1989 at 9:30AM at the UNT College of Music. It includes a lecture and performance by Jamey Aebersold, saxophone, interspersed with questions from the audience.
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Date: April 10, 1989
Duration: 1 hour 23 minutes 43 seconds
Creator: Aebersold, Jamey
Partner: UNT Music Library
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[Jeff Andrews Lecture, April 18, 1989: Parts 3 and 4]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Jeff Andrews on April 18, 1989 at 2:00PM at the UNT College of Music. It includes a lecture and performance by Jeff Andrews, bass, interspersed with questions from the audience.
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Date: April 18, 1989
Duration: 1 hour 39 minutes 30 seconds
Creator: Andrews, Jeff
Partner: UNT Music Library
transcript

[Don Grolnick Lecture March 7, 1989: Parts 3 and 4]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Don Grolnick on March 07, 1989 at 2:00PM at the UNT College of Music. It includes a lecture and performance by Don Grolnick, piano, interspersed with questions from the audience.
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Date: March 7, 1989
Duration: 1 hour 31 minutes 57 seconds
Creator: Grolnick, Don
Partner: UNT Music Library
transcript

[Gunther Schuller Lecture, February 14, 1989: Parts 1 and 2]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Gunther Schuller on February 14, 1989 at 2:00PM at the UNT College of Music. Includes lectures by Gunther Schuller, jazz historian, interspersed with questions from the audience.
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Date: February 14, 1989
Duration: 1 hour 37 minutes 19 seconds
Creator: Schuller, Gunther
Partner: UNT Music Library
transcript

[Slide Hampton Lecture, February 21, 1989: Parts 1 and 2]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Slide Hampton on February 21, 1989 at 9:30AM at the UNT College of Music. Includes lecture and performance by Slide Hampton, trombone, interspersed with questions from the audience.
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Date: February 21, 1989
Duration: 1 hour 25 minutes 24 seconds
Creator: Hampton, Slide
Partner: UNT Music Library
transcript

[Steve Kahn Lecture, April 4, 1989: Parts 3 and 4]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Steve Kahn on April 4, 1989 at 2:00PM at the UNT College of Music. It includes a lecture and performance by Steve Khan, guitar, interspersed with questions from the audience.
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Date: April 4, 1989
Duration: 1 hour 40 minutes 48 seconds
Creator: Kahn, Steve
Partner: UNT Music Library
transcript

[Steve Kahn Lecture, April 4, 1989: Parts 1 and 2]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Steve Kahn on April 4, 1989 at 9:30AM at the UNT College of Music. It includes a lecture and performance by Steve Khan, guitar, interspersed with questions from the audience.
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Date: April 4, 1989
Duration: 2 hours 3 minutes 48 seconds
Creator: Kahn, Steve
Partner: UNT Music Library
transcript

[Jeff Andrews Lecture, April 18, 1989: Parts 1 and 2]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Jeff Andrews on April 18, 1989 at 9:30AM at the UNT College of Music. It includes a lecture and performance by Jeff Andrews, bass, interspersed with questions from the audience.
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Date: April 18, 1989
Duration: 1 hour 26 minutes 22 seconds
Creator: Andrews, Jeff
Partner: UNT Music Library
transcript

[Jamey Aebersold Lecture, April 10, 1989: Parts 3 and 4]

Description: Jazz Lecture Series presentation by Jamey Aebersold on April 25, 1989 at 2:00PM at the UNT College of Music. It includes a lecture and performance by Jamey Aebersold, saxophone, interspersed with questions from the audience.
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Date: April 10, 1989
Duration: 1 hour 37 minutes 11 seconds
Creator: Aebersold, Jamey
Partner: UNT Music Library

Les Innocents

Description: The genesis for "Les innocents" came from an article on the French revolution. I was struck how the, as now, innocent un-polarized people are very often the unspoken victims of social upheavals. This piece is a small testimonial to these people. Formally "Les Innocents" uses a technique that I have been working with for the last few years which uses natural event entropy as its basis. I use the term "Contiguous, Non-Contiguous, Event Mapping" to describe the constantly shifting parade of events that present themselves, much like the action on a street corner where few activities or conversations are perceived in full. The scoring is for Free Bass Accordion, Oboe, Clarinet, Sampler / Keyboard (pipe organ samples), violin, viola, cello and tape. All instruments are at concert pitch. This piece was premiered in Nov. 89 by the UART MIDI Ensemble.
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Date: 1989
Duration: 31 minutes 19 seconds
Creator: Wraggett, Wes Richard, 1953-
Partner: UNT Music Library

Mura-Iki

Description: "Mura-Iki" was inspired by the different traditions of playing the flutes, especially those from the Far East. The Tradition of the Shakuhachi was of particular importance due to the extensive use of breathy playing. Thus the tittle "Mura-Iki" which means "Explosive Breath". The piece is though written for the "modern" Boehm Flutes, all played by one performer. The performer has generated sounds of different kinds : breathly sounds with and without tongued attack ; harmonics ; flageolets ; overblowing ; hole slaps ; mixtures of tones and breath ; multiphonics ; break tones ; different kinds of lip pressure, etc... All these kinds of techniques are fed into the computer and then manipulated and edited. In this way, the electronic material emerged : large breathy sounds contrary to breathy attacks, hard percussive sounds and sustained multiphonic-like soundscapes. The performer, on the other hand, performs the sounds in their pure nature origin. In addition to the above mentioned main material, eight double-basses have been synthesized partly for providing a sonic contrast due to the different kinds od attacks and sustained character, and partly to provide a "bottom note" for the feel of floating "tonality" especially during the parts where the multiphonics shade and pass by. Further, the musical form has the same parameters as some of the electronic sounds, which again are derived from the row and the values of the notes. Thus there is a similary in the syntax of the form and the sounds which provide some kind of integral semantics of the piece. Sissel Dorum, flutes
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Date: [1989,1990]
Duration: 17 minutes 31 seconds
Creator: Johnsen, Kjell, 1945-
Partner: UNT Music Library

Dialog II für blockflöte und computer

Description: "Dialog II" is a composition about the songs of the humpback whales. Wales are able to compose songs, consisting of six themes, which can be each separated in 4 or 6 motives. These motives change during the travel of the whole group of whales from the North Pole to the South Pole and back wards. Time after time new motives come into the song, others are lost. This idea is the idea of the composition. Between the musician and the computer begins an interactive process, both are getting more and more to a unit. The playing of the musician controls the out put of the computer. The output of the computer controls the out put of the musician. The score exists in form of a computer score, which is put on the computer screen. The computer score is generated live while the performance and is in every performance different. The composition is a real time composition in which the musician controls with his play his intensity the process and duration of the composition.
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Date: 1989
Duration: 10 minutes 50 seconds
Creator: Schweizer, Frank, 1962-
Partner: UNT Music Library

Sleeping Beauty

Description: This music was not directly inspired by the classic Grimm's Fable or Walt Disney's film of the same name. This particular "sleeping beauty" grew out of a computer design project dealing with representations of various dream states. With apologies to Rip Van Winkle, my vehicle for these six fantasies is the sleeping beauty character. An objective observation is that each of the six movements represent an undefined dream or dream state. The listener is invited to invent any programmatic content that the music may suggest. The work is orchestrated for solo amplified violin and computer controlled digital synthesizers. In addition, the sound of the violin is modified by a set of digital signal processors and, in many cases, the violin is indistinguishable from the electronic synthesizers. Everything is controlled in real-time via a Macintosh computer. The composition employs a Just Intonation specified by the composer, Lou Harrison in his work, Joyous Procession, and homage is made to Mr. Harrison in the title of the last movement to Sleeping Beauty. The initial sketches for the computer voices were done at Stanford University CCRMA in the fall of 1988 and the composition was completed in the composer's studio in March of 1989.
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Date: 1989
Duration: 21 minutes 56 seconds
Creator: Strange, Allen
Partner: UNT Music Library

Fire Music

Description: Computer programmes represent a gradual creation of an expert system which simulates artificial intelligence in a possible imitation of man's creation in music. In the global algorithm there are three correlated levels: 1. cosmosophic concept by Ž. Todorović (applied mathematics testing the noumenal word) as the control part of the programme participates in the coding of sound on the level of structuring reality of higher order; 2. processing of data subjected to total serialization, branching into modules of »frozen sound images from the past« (simulation of the modal system, tonal system or a style, for instance, Baroque); 3. realization of output on the level of phenomena: the choice of sound generators and possible mixtures, the effect on vital points of electronically generated sound, etc. This two recording of »Music of Cosmic Models« Saturnalias and Fire Music was made in Electronic Studio of Radio Belgrade in 1988-1989.
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Date: 1989
Duration: 21 minutes 21 seconds
Creator: Šijanec, Marjan, 1950-
Partner: UNT Music Library

Révolution ?

Description: This piece attempts to emotionally capture the political changes in the GDR and the consequences that go with them.
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Date: 1989
Duration: 10 minutes 11 seconds
Creator: Lakomy, Reinhard
Partner: UNT Music Library

Antiphonae

Description: Was initially conceived as vocal music for two choirs, however the computer realization, which I prepared in 1987, took over from this first conception and resulted in a piece that would be hard to define. A11 the sounds have been synthesized. They originated by direct sound synthesis on the WAX/EMS computer using the CHANT program. These sounds created in the first two minutes of the piece. The sounds for the subsequent 12 minutes which form a kind of variations, are transformations of the original material, either through digital reverberation and delay or using voices and sound layers super imposed onto one another. They were realized at the polish Radio's Studio Eksperymentalne" in Warsaw in 1989. The central idea of the piece is the progressive decomposition. Starting from the "realistic" vocal sound it leads onto more and more "electronic" idioms, which never less retain elements of their vocal origin. The world premiere of the piece took place at the Techno-Musical Biennale in Koriyama, Japan in August 1989.
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Date: 1989
Duration: 20 minutes 38 seconds
Creator: Kotoński, Włodzimierz
Partner: UNT Music Library

La Confession

Description: This work was created from a story entitled "The Confession" that I wrote in 1989. In Spanish originally, it was translated into Hebrew, French, English and German. Some of these texts in different languages have been integrated into the work. "Confession" records the psychological oscillations - from mental stability to madness or vice versa - that the protagonist goes through. "The Confession" of the human voice, the electronic instruments (synclaiver), the acoustic instruments (harp, trombone, cello, flute, percussion) and the concrete sounds create a semantic interaction with the syntax of the musical language.
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Date: 1989
Duration: 8 minutes 23 seconds
Creator: Schmilovich, Sergio
Partner: UNT Music Library

Lesion

Description: Lesion was composed by manipulation a collection of processed and synthetic textures were generated with compositional algorithms. The title refers specially to the intentional destruction of brain tissue, and in a broader sense, Lesion is an allegory that explicates the process and impact of attempting to control, systems that one does not fully understand. The acoustic sources employed in Lesion include bowed bicycle spokes, amplified guitar, and a sample of Ethel Merman. The synthetic sources in the piece were created by a variety of additive and granular techniques. These raw sound sources were then processed extensively by a variety of distortion, filtering, and phases vocoding facilities; in general, the product of this processing generally transformed the semantic content of the signals to the extent that their original form was unrecognisable. I also developed two important granular synthesis based processors/ djin, which performs granular based temporal and pitch scaling of signals, and pvgdis, a granular resynthesizer of phase vocoder analysis data. Other important processors include several time-varying resonation schemes; this was driven by a ratio-based composition algorithm. I also used linear prediction extensively, again-often employing the processors by employing Csound's comb and allpass filter facilities. I also designed a battalion of chorus/delay/flange related processors; Sludgefunk and Boxcore were the most popular in Lesion. Lesion is approximately 9'20" minutes in duration and was realised entirely at the Computer Music Instruction Laboratory (CMIL) sun3 network at the University of California, San Diego. The sample quantization is 16-bit and the sample rate of realisation is 30,000 Hz.
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Date: 1989
Duration: 9 minutes 30 seconds
Creator: Penrose, Christopher, 1967-
Partner: UNT Music Library

La Fleur Permanente

Description: It's hard for me to commemorate a revolution that is not mine; I can learn about this Revolution by the historical approach, the essays of fictions, its images on stage or in visual, traces in France or indirectly anywhere in Europe. In Finland, the Revolution is suspended by historical events that the majority have already forgotten. The grandeur of the French Revolution is probably a kind of unconscious of the kind of ancient Greek culture, the religion of the West, the industrial revolution, the Russian revolution, world wars etc ... In "La Fleur Permanente", the Revolution seems like a scene next to it. The main part is based on four people who each in their own way express themselves in this case in relation with France. A Finn who lived his entire childhood in France, then moved, who went to Finland and after a few years, went to Austria. A Frenchman who related to family events, was an immigrant teenager in Finland. A Finnish / Swedish actress who partly studied in Finland, partly in France and then worked for a few years in France. And someone, who was very strongly impressed by the French culture. This work is based on a group of "images" that are deployed together in different ways, both different tempi dissolutions, collages and layers. As content, "the perennial flower" deals with a question, the question between its four people and France and a time especially that is characterized by changes that are fast and circular.
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Date: 1989
Duration: 20 minutes
Creator: Kosk, Patrick, 1951-
Partner: UNT Music Library
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