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Carrier-free Radioisotopes from Cyclotron Targets I. Preparation and Isolation of Sn113 and In114 from Cadmium

Description: The cyclotron is the only practical source of many carrier-free radioisotopes. The preparation and radiochemical isolation of a number of these activities, produced in the 60-inch cyclotron of Crocker Laboratory, will be presented in this paper and in subsequent papers of this series. In most cases the carrier-free radioisotopes were prepared for use in biological systems and the final preparations were in the form of isotonic saline solutions at a range of pH from 5 to 8. The present paper reports the radiochemical isolation of carrier-free Sn{sup 113} and In{sup 114} produced by bombarding cadmium with 38 Mev alpha-particles. At this energy, Sn{sup 113} and In{sup 114} are produced in a thick target by the nuclear reactions; Cd{sup 110}({alpha},n)Sn{sup 113}, Cd{sup 111}({alpha},2n)Sn{sup 113}, Cd{sup 112}({alpha},3n)Sn{sup 113}, Cd{sup 111}({alpha},p)In{sup 114}, Cd{sup 112}({alpha},pn) In{sup 114}. The shorter-lived tin and indium activities together with the possible radioisotopes of silver produced by (n,p) reactions, were allowed to decay out prior to the chemical separations.
Date: August 11, 1949
Creator: Maxwell, R.D.; Haymond, H.R.; Bobmberger, D.R.; Garrison, W.M. & Hamilton, J.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Eight New Synthetic Elements

Description: In an early continuation of the investigation of the radioactive isotopes of element number 43 (technetium) Segre and Seaborg produced by the deuteron and neutron bombardment of molybdenum the isotope Tc{sup 99}, which they observed to decay by means of an isomeric transition with a half-life of 6.6 hours to a lower isomeric state with a half-life greater than 40 years. The upper isomeric state of this isotope was observed by Segre and C. S. Wu to be produced in the fission of uranium and more recently R. P. Schumann and also D. C. Lincoln and W. H Sullivan working on the Plutonium Project of the Manhattan District have independently observed the beta-particles of half-life about 10 years due to the lower isomeric state. Later work by E. E. Motta and G. E. Boyd sets a more accurate value of 9.4 x 10{sup 5} years for this half-life. Since this isotope is formed in rather large amounts, namely, a fission yield of 6.2%, in the slow neutron induced fission of uranium it is now possible to isolate technetium in weighable amounts and in rather substantial quantities. For example, a uranium pile operating at a power level of 10{sup 5} kw would produce about four grams of technetium, as the isotope T{sup 99}, per day. With such a long half-life the radioactivity associated with convenient amounts (some mg.) would be so small in intensity as to not create a problem provided reasonable care in handling were exercised.
Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: Seaborg, Glenn T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low Mass Francium and Emanation Isotopes of High AlphaStability

Description: Isotopes of francium with 126 or fewer neutrons have been looked for in bombardments of Th{sup 232} with 350 Mev protons from the 184-inch cyclotron. Fr{sup 212} with an apparent half-life of 19.3 minutes for branching decay by alpha emission (44%) to At{sup 208} and by orbital electron capture (56%) to Em{sup 212} has been found. Em{sup 212} is shown to be a 23-minute alpha-emitter. At{sup 208} decays primarily (99.5%) by orbital electron capture to Po{sup 208}, but shows 0.5% alpha-branching. The francium and emanation isotopes have alpha half-lives completely out of line with the predictions based on the previously known isotopes of these elements. Their high alpha stability is believed to be due to a closed shell of 126 neutrons in analogy to the behavior of elements 83-85. The non-existence of long-lived francium in nature is discussed in the terms of this and other recent work on francium isotopes.
Date: October 10, 1949
Creator: Hyde, E.K.; Ghiorso, A. & Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New Low Mass Isotopes of Emanation (Element 86)

Description: Among the spallation products obtained from the 350-Mev proton bombardment of Th{sup 232} they have identified two gaseous alpha-emitters which apparently do not decay into any presently known alpha-decay chains. The half-lives observed for the decay of the alpha-activities are 23 minutes and 2.1 hours. These half-lives may be principally determined by an unknown amount of orbital electron capture. At least one alpha-emitting daughter (about 4 hours half-life) has been observed to grow from a gaseous parent, but it has not been determined whether it arises from alpha-decay or electron-capture. Since these gaseous atoms emit alpha-particles it is assumed that they are isotopes of element 86 (emanation or radon) rather than a lighter rare gas. if they were heavy isotopes such as Em{sup 221} or Em{sup 223}, both unknown, they would decay into known alpha-decay series, the neptunium and actinium series, respectively, and so would grow known short lived alpha-emitters which would have been detected. It thus appears reasonable that they must be lighter than the known emanation isotopes.
Date: September 5, 1949
Creator: Ghiorso, A.; Meinke, W.W. & Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nitrogen 12

Description: N{sup 12} is shown to have a half life of 12.5 {+-} 1 milliseconds, and a positron upper limit of 16.6 {+-} 0.2 Mev. It is produced by the reaction C{sup 12}(p,n)N{sup 12}, and has a threshold proton energy of 20.0 Mev. This indicates that N{sup 12} is within about 200 Kev of being unstable against proton emission. The mass of N{sup 12} is 12.0228 {+-} 0.00015, and the beta transition is allowed.
Date: January 19, 1949
Creator: Alvarez, Luis W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Systematics of Alpha-Radioactivity

Description: Correlations of alpha-decay energies in terms of mass number and atomic number have been made for all of the alpha-emitting species now numbering over 100. For each element isotopes show increase in alpha-energy with decrease in mass number except in the region of 126 neutrons where there is an explainable reversal. This reversal has the effect of creating a region of relatively low alpha-energy and long half-life at low mass numbers for such elements as astatine, emanation, francium, and possibly higher elements as had been noted already for bismuth and polonium. Methods and examples of using alpha-decay data to define the energy surface in the heavy element region are discussed. The regularities in alpha-decay are used for predictions of nuclear properties including prediction of the beta-stable nuclides among the heavy elements. The half-life vs. energy correlations show that the even-even nuclides conform well with existing alpha-decay theory, but all nuclear types with odd nucleons show prohibited decay. The reason for this prohibition is not found in spin changes in the alpha-emission but in the assembly of the components of the alpha particle, and this theory is discussed further in terms of observations made on nuclides having two or more alpha-groups. Using most of the even-even nuclei to define 'normal nuclear radius' calculations are now able to show the shrinkage in the regions of lead and of 126 neutrons to amount to about 10%. The much greater change in 'effective radius' for bismuth isotopes can be dissociated into the effects of odd nucleons superimposed on the actual decrease in nuclear radius. The simple expression r = 1.48 A{sup 1/3} {center_dot} 10{sup -13} cm seems to fit the data for the even-even nuclei outside of the region of 126 neutrons better than more complex functions.
Date: September 12, 1949
Creator: Perlman, I.; Ghiorso, A. & Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Production for Mesons by X-rays

Description: At the spring, 1949, meeting of the National Academy of Sciences(l) a preliminary account was given of some observations of mesons produced by the 335 Mev x-ray beam from the Berkeley synchrotron. The present paper is a progress report of this work; no claim is made for completeness, but sufficient new data are available to make publication at this time worth while, especially since some of the numerical results given in the earlier report require revision. The x-ray beam, produced by the impact of 335 Mev electrons on a 20 mil thick platinum target, has a width at half maximum of 0.0135 radian (about 1 inch at 6 feet from the target). In all but the earliest experiments the beam was further defined by a 1 inch hole in a lead block, then passed through a piece of carbon which served as the meson source. The x-ray intensity at one meter from the target was about 3500 r per hour (measured behind 1/8 inch of lead) under the best running conditions; the average was about half this. The actual exposures at the carbon meson source (6 feet from the target) ranged from 500 to 2000 r in the later runs. Mesons were recorded on Ilford nuclear plates; the highest density of meson endings observed was about 100 per square centimeter in a 100 micron emulsion. In the following sections the experimental conditions and some of the results are described in more detail.
Date: September 15, 1949
Creator: McMillan, Edwin M.; Peterson, Jack & White, R. Stephen
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Proposed Experimental Test of the Neutrino Theory

Description: The experiment outlined in this proposal has the possibility of giving an answer to the important question, 'Does the neutrino exist'? It is unfortunate that at the present time, there is no convincing experimental that neutrinos exist. Two recent articles review the status of various experiments which could give information about neutrinos. In general, these experiments give results in agreement with the predictions of beta decay theory. But actually, if even the most complete of the 'recoil type' experiments could be performed satisfactorily, all that could be concluded would be the following: the energy and momentum relationships in beta decay are consistent with the theory that the known energy deficit is carried away by a single particle. But to emphasize the fact that this would not constitute a proof of the real existence of that particle, the following quotations from the review articles should be noted. Crane says, 'All of the evidence about the neutrino is, as already pointed out, indirect in character since neutrinos have not yet been caught after leaving the nucleus. It can, of course, be argued on very general grounds that, if energy is not conserved between nucleus and electron, momentum should not be expected to be conserved either, and in consequence of this, it has often been remarked that the recoiled experiments add nothing that is really new to their knowledge'. Allen concludes his article by saying, 'Practically all the experimental evidence indicates that there is an apparent non-conservation of momentum in the beta decay process, and that the neutrino hypothesis is at least one explanation of the missing momentum'.
Date: April 18, 1949
Creator: Alvarez, Luis W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diffraction Effects in Neutron Attenuation Measurements

Description: All errors due to diffraction effects in a neutron attenuation experiment are computed. Also a special experiment to measure the forward intensity of diffracted neutrons from lead and copper is described, and the results given. These agree with the theoretical values.
Date: November 1, 1947
Creator: McMillan, E.M. & Sewell, D.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Some Excitation Functions of Bismuth

Description: Excitation functions have been measured, using a 38-Mev alpha-beam and a 19-Mev deuteron beam for the following reactions: Bi({alpha},2n)At{sup 211}, Bi({alpha},3n)At{sup 210}, Bi(d,p)Ra E, Bi(d,n)Po{sup 210}, and Bi(d,3n)Po{sup 209}. The results are summarized in Figs. 4 and 5 and Tables I and II. A new isotope of astatine, At{sup 210}, has been identified; this isotope has a half life of 8.3 hr., decaying by K-capture to Po{sup 210} with the emission of a 1.0-Mev gamma-ray and a few conversion electrons.
Date: October 10, 1948
Creator: Kelly, E.L. & Segre, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Half-Life for Double Beta-Decay

Description: Fireman(1) has reported the results of a rather difficult beta-particle coincidence counting experiment in which the decay of Sn{sup 124} by the simultaneous emission of two negative beta-particles, with a half-life between 0.4 x 10{sup 16} years and 0.9 x 10{sup 16} years, seems to have been observed. This note reports the results obtained from a different and somewhat simpler method of looking for the phenomenon of simultaneous emission of two beta-particles. These results are negative so far and show that this process is considerably less probable in the case chosen by us than in that reported by Fireman. The method consists of looking in uranium samples for 90-year Pu{sup 238} which would come from U{sup 238} by the double beta-particle mechanism since Np{sup 238} is heavier than U{sup 238}, which in turn is substantially heavier than Pu{sup 238}, in the isobaric triplet {sub 92}U{sup 238}-{sub 93}Np{sup 238}-{sub 94}Pu{sup 238}. This chemical method of investigation is particularly applicable to this isobaric triplet because there appears to be no other mechanisms to account for the Pu{sup 238} should it be found. The energetics of the situation are summarized in the following diagram, where the disintegration energies are derived from sources which may be traced through a recent compilation.
Date: October 21, 1949
Creator: Levine, C.A.; Ghiorso, A. & Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

N-17, A Delayed Neutron Emitter

Description: The decay scheme of a 4.2 second neutron emitter has been investigated in detail. Chemical and physical evidence shows that it is N{sup 17}, which emits beta rays to a broad excited state of O{sup 17}, which then breaks up into a neutron plus O{sup 16}. The energy spectrum of the neutrons is determined by measuring the energies of the O{sup 16} recoils in a proportional counter. The neutrons have a most probable energy of 0.9 Mev, a 'half width' of less than .5 Mev, and an upper limit of about 2 Mev. {beta}-recoil coincidences are observed, as predicted by the Bohr-Wheeler theory, and the {beta}-ray energy is measured by absorption. The beta rays in coincidence with neutrons have an upper limit of 3.7 {+-} 0.2 Mev. Beta-rays directly to the ground stat of O{sup 17} are not observed because of high background effects, but should have an energy of 8.7 Mev. Some evidence is presented to show that energy is conserved in the {beta}-n transition through the broad excited state in O{sup 17}.
Date: November 5, 1948
Creator: Alvarez, L. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alpha-Decay in Isotopes of Atomic Number Less Than 83

Description: Some time ago we started work in an attempt to observe alpha-particle decay in isotopes of atomic number less than 83. In the first experiments, thin targets of gold leaf were bombarded with 190-Mev deuterons in the 184-inch cyclotron. Two alpha-decay periods were observed in these targets; one of 0.7 minutes half-life and another of 4.3 minutes half-life. The alpha-particle energies were 5.7 and 5.2 Mev, respectively. Chemical separations proved that the 4.3-minute period is due to a gold isotope and suggested that the 0.7-minute period is due to a mercury isotope. The mass numbers of these new isotopes have not been determined. However, the results of excitation-functions in the production of the gold isotope by bombarding gold and platinum with protons suggest that its mass number lies in the range 185-188. The work on this isotope indicates that the alpha to electron capture branching ratio is of the order of magnitude of 10{sup -4}, and that positron activity accompanies the 4.3-minute alpha-period.
Date: September 5, 1949
Creator: Thompson, S.G.; Ghiorso, A.; Radmussen, J.O. & Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Artificial Collateral Chains to the Thorium and ActiniumFamilies

Description: The authors have produced and identified two new series of alpha-particle emitting radioactive elements; one is a 'collateral' branch of the actinium (4n + 3) radioactive family and the other is collateral to the thorium (4n) family. The series are of considerable interest in that they are the first whose early members lie on the neutron deficient side of beta stability. They have been produced in high yield of irradiation of thorium with deuterons of energy about {sup 80}Mev in the Berkeley 184-inch cyclotron. So far as the present observations are concerned both of these series begin with isotopes of protactinium (atomic number 91), although progenitors with higher atomic numbers are to be expected and will possibly be produced and identified. These protactinium isotopes are Pa{sup 227} and Pa{sup 228} formed by d,7n and d,6n reactions respectively.
Date: July 1, 1948
Creator: Ghiorso, A.; Meinke, W.W. & Seaborg, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Fission of Thorium with Alpha Particles

Description: The fission distribution of fission of thorium with alpha particle of average energy 37.5 Mev has been measured by the chemical method. The distribution found shows that the characteristic dip in the fission yield mass spectrum has been raised to within a factor of two of the peaks compared to a factor of 600 in slow neutron fission of U{sup 235}. The raise in the deip has caused a corresponding lowering in fission yield of these elements at the peaks. The cross section for fission of thorium with 37.5 Mev alphas was found to be about 0.6 barn, and the threshold for fission was found to be 23 to 24 Mev.
Date: April 15, 1948
Creator: Newton, Amos S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Fission of thorium with Alpha Particles

Description: Soon after the discovery of fission, Meitner, Bretscher and Cook found differences in the decay of various chemical fractions separated from uranium irradiated with slow neutrons and thorium irradiated with fast neutrons respectively and suggested that a difference existed in the distribution of fission products in the two cases. In 1940, Turner suggested that the distribution in various modes of fission should be investigated. The fact that elements such as tin, cadmium, palladium, and silver were found in fast neutron and deuteron fission of uranium and thorium before they were found in slow neutron fission of uranium suggested that the middle region of the distribution was raised as the energy of the incident particle was increased. Since the compound nucleus formed in the fission of thorium with alpha particles is U{sup 236}, the same compound nucleus formed in the fission of U{sup 235} with neutrons, it is of interest to study the fission of thorium with alphas and compare the resulting distribution of fission products with that found with uranium with slow and thorium with fast neutrons. Any difference between the various results where the same compound nucleus is formed must be due to differences in energy content and possible differences in distribution of the nucleons in the compound nucleus at the time of fission.
Date: October 15, 1948
Creator: Newton, Amos S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Production of Mesons by the 184-inch Berkeley Cyclotron

Description: The authors have observed tracks which they believe to be due to mesons in photographic plates placed near a target bombarded by 380 Mev alpha particles. For a 10-minute exposure in the cyclotron, about 50 meson tracks are found along the 3-inch edge of a photographic plate. The mass has been determined by measuring the bending in the magnetic field and the range in emulsion. From the first 50 meson tracks measured they find a mass of 313 {+-} 16 electron masses. It is highly probable that these mesons are the heavy mesons described by Lattes, Occhialini, and Powell.
Date: January 1, 1948
Creator: Gardner, Eugene & Lattes, C.M.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Production of Mesons by the 184-inch Berkeley Cyclotron Part I. Experimental Arrangement

Description: The authors have observed traks which they believe to be due to mesons in photographic plates placed near a ta5rget bombarded by 380 Mev alpha particles. The plates used were Ilford Nuclear Research Plates, type C.2. the identification of the particles responsible for the tracks was first made on the basis of the appearance of the tracks; they show the same type of scattering and variation of grain density with residual range found in cosmic ray meson tracks and about two-thirds of them produce observable stars at the end of their range. For a 10-minute exposure in the cyclotron, about 50 meson tracks are found along the 3-inch edge of a photographic plate. Carbon, beryllium, copper, and uranium have been used so far as target materials, and all are found to give mesons. When a carbon target was bombarded with 300 Mev alpha particles, mesons were found but with reduced yield.
Date: April 1, 1948
Creator: Gardner, Eugene & Lattes, C.M.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Studies with Colloids Containing Radioisotopes of Yttrium, Zirconium, Columbium, and Lanthanum: 1. The Chemical Principles and Methods Involved in Preparation of Colloids of Yttrium, Zirconium, Columbium, and Lanthanum

Description: For a number of investigations, including fundamental studies of radiation effects on living tissues and therapeutic utilization of radioisotopes, it is valuable to have methods for the selective localization of radioisotopes in certain tissues. Finely dispersed anhydrous chromic phosphate has been found useful by Jones, Wrobel, and Lyons in selectively irradiating the liver and spleen with p{sup 32} beta particles. The present studies, reported in this and the following communication, are concerned with methods for controlled selective localization of colloids (incorporating radioisotopes) in the liver, spleen, or bone marrow, and with an analysis of some of the factors involved in the phenomenon of localization.
Date: April 21, 1948
Creator: Gofman, John W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Studies with Colloids Containing Radioisotopes of Yttrium, Zirconium, Columbium and Lanthaum: 2. The Controlled Selective Localization of Radioisotopes of Yttrium, Zirconium, Columbium in the Bone Marrow, Liver and Spleen

Description: Several workers have shown that certain colloidally dispered materials are removed from the blood stream by the liver and spleen. Jones, Wrobel, and Lyons have utilized suspensions of anhydrous chromic phosphate for the selective irradiation of the liver and spleen with p{sup 32} beta particles. Gersh demonstrated that colloidal calcium phosphate is taken up by the liver and spleen. He stressed the failure of bone marrow phagocytes to take up this colloid in rats and dogs (though he referred to possible uptake in the marrow of rabbits under special conditions), and commented on the relative 'refractoriness' in general of the bono marrow as compared with liver and spleen with respect to the uptake of colloidal dyes from the blood stream. Some histological data indicate that 'Thorotrast' (a colloidal thorium dioxide preparation) is deposited in the bone marrow as well as in the liver and spleen, but no quantitative data as to the relative distribution are available. In the preceding communication the methods for the preparation of colloids incorporating radioisotopes of yttrium, columbium, and zirconium were given. The present studies are concerned with the localization of such colloids primarily in the bone marrow or primarily in the spleen and liver, with an analysis of some of the factors which may be responsible for differences in localization.
Date: April 21, 1948
Creator: Dobson, E.L.; Gofman, J.W.; Jones, H.B.; Kelly, Lola S. & Walker, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Metabolism of Curium in the RAT

Description: The heaviest of the known elements is curium, which was recently discovered by Seaborg and his associates. This new element can be produced by the alpha particle transmutation of plutonium by the following reaction: {sub 94}Pu{sup 239} + {sub 2}He{sup 4} {yields} {sub 96}Cm{sup 242} + {sub 0}N{sup 1} This isotope of curium is radioactive and decays by the emission of an alpha particle to form plutonium 238 which, in turn, is also radioactive. Curium 242 has a half-life of 150 days, and its radioactive daughter, plutonium 238, has a half-life of 50 years. This isotope of plutonium decays by the emission of an alpha particle to form uranium 234 which has a half-life of 233,000 years. Shortly after the organization of the Atomic Energy Project, it became apparent that formidable problems would be presented as the result of the release of nuclear energy. One of the most urgent of these was the hazard presented by the production of large quantities of the radio-elements created by the fission of uranium and the coincidental formation of neptunium and plutonium. In an attempt to evaluate the potential danger presented by these radio-elements from the chain reacting pile, a large series of metabolic studies with experimental animals were undertaken in a number of laboratories working upon the Atomic Energy program. These studies, which have been briefly summarized elsewhere, included a series of investigations on the metabolism in the rat of the more important members of the fission products in the carrier-free state, as well as most of the heaviest elements at the end of the periodic table. These studies made it possible to predict on a semi-quantitative basis the potential hazards that this large number of radioactive elements might present should they gain entry into the body.
Date: January 15, 1948
Creator: Hamilton, J.; Scott, K. & Axelrod, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ATOMIC DISPLACEMENTS PRODUCED BY FISSION FRAGMENTS AND FISSION NEUTRONS IN MATTER

Description: About four-fifths of the energy of the fission process is shared by the two heavy fragments into which the nucleus splits. This energy, of about 80 Mev. per fragment, is transferred to the medium in which the fission takes place in two ways. First, because each fragment is stripped of about half of its electrons during most of its path, it will interact strongly with electrons and thus lose energy through ionizing collisions with other atoms. Secondly, the fragments will lose energy by elastic collisions with atoms as a whole. Each fragment leaves in its wake a cloud of moving electrons and atoms. This cloud will roughly resemble a cylinder whose radius will increase with time on account of the motion of the struck electrons and atoms. They may now investigate two features of the slowing down process. First as it affects the fragment, i.e. we calculate its range, straggling, etc. And secondly they may work out the motion of the cylinder of moving particles, its effect on the medium, etc.
Date: June 29, 1949
Creator: Ozeroff, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

C-616 UF$sub 6$ HYDROLYSIS FUMES

Description: Experiments were carried out to determine how fast the concentration of suspended material decreases in fumes produced by the hydrolysis of UF/sub 6/ vapor in damp air. The rate of aggregation is a function chiefly of the number of particles per unit gas volume, but depends also on the chemical composition, size and shape of the particles, the temperature and pressure, and the degree of agitation. The rate of settling depends on the weight and shape of the particles and the viscosity of the gas. (W.L.H.)
Date: January 24, 1945
Creator: Fisher, M. & Cines, M.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department