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CROSS SECTION MEASUREMENTS IN THE MAIN INJECTOR PARTICLE PRODUCTION (FNAL-E907) EXPERIMENT AT 58 GEV ENERGY

Description: Cross-sections are presented for 58 GeV {pi}, K, and p on a wide range of nuclear targets. These cross-sections are essential for determining the neutrino flux in measurements of neutrino cross-sections and oscillations. The E907 Main Injector Particle Production (MIPP) experiment at Fermilab is a fixed target experiment for measuring hadronic particle production using primary 120 GeV/c protons and secondary {pi}, K, and p beams. The particle identification is made by dE/dx in a time projection chamber, and by time-of-flight, differential Cherenkov and ring imaging Cherenkov detectors, which together cover a wide range of momentum from 0.1 GeV/c up to 120 GeV/c. MIPP targets span the periodic table, from hydrogen to uranium, including beryllium and carbon. The MIPP has collected {approx} 0.26 x 10{sup 6} events of 58 GeV/c secondary particles produced by protons from the main injector striking a carbon target.
Date: December 1, 2009
Creator: Gunaydin, Yusuf Oguzhan & U., /Iowa
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a Focusing DIRC

Description: Benefiting from the recent introduction of new fast vacuum-based photon detectors with a transit time spread of {sigma}{sub TTS} {approx} 30-150 ps, we are developing a novel RICH detector capable of correcting the chromatic error through good time measurements; we believe that this is the first time such a technique has been demonstrated. We have built and successfully tested a particle identification detector called ''Focusing DIRC''. The concept of the prototype is based on the BaBar DIRC, with several important improvements: (a) much faster pixelated photon detectors based on Burle MCP-PMTs and Hamamatsu MaPMTs, (b) a focusing mirror which allows the photon detector to be smaller and less sensitive to background in future applications, (c) electronics allowing the measurement of single photon timing to better than {sigma} {approx} 100-200ps, which allows a correction of the chromatic error. The detector was tested in a SLAC 10GeV/c electron test beam. This detector concept could be used for particle identification at Super B-factory, ILC, GlueX, Panda, etc.
Date: December 12, 2006
Creator: Benitez, J.; Bedajanek, I.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Mazaheri, G.; Ratcliff, B.; Suzuki, K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurements of CP asymmetries and branching fractions of two-body charmless decays of B^0 and B^0_s mesons

Description: The thesis is organized as follows: Chapter 1 describes the theoretical framework of non-leptonic B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} H{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} decays, with a simple overview of the CP violation mechanism within the Standard Model and of the most used phenomenological approaches in the evaluation of strong interaction contributions. The chapter contains also a review of the theoretical expectations and the current experimental measurements along with a discussion about the importance of studying such decays. Chapter 2 contains a general description of the Tevatron collider and of the CDF II detector. Chapter 3 is devoted to the description of the data sample used for the measurement and the method used in extracting the signal from the background. Particular attention is dedicated to the on-line trigger selection, which is crucial to collect a sample enriched in B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} decays. Chapter 4 shows how the information from kinematics and particle identification was used to achieve a statistical discrimination amongst modes to extract individual measurements. The available resolutions in mass or in particle identification are separately insufficient for an event-by-event separation of B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} modes. The choice of observables and the technique used to combine them is an important and innovative aspect of the analysis described in this thesis. Chapter 5 is devoted to the accurate determination of the invariant mass lineshape. This is a crucial ingredient for resolving overlapping mass peaks. This chapter details all resolution effects with particular attention at the tails due to the emission of low-energy photons from charged kaons and pions in the final state (FSR). For the first time the effect of FSR has been accurately accounted for in a CDF analysis. Chapter 6 describes how kinematic and PID information, discussed in chap. 4 and chap. 5 ...
Date: December 1, 2007
Creator: Morello, Michael Joseph & /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Report - Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program - Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Sandia National Laboratory

Description: This report covers the three main projects that collectively comprised the Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program. Chapter 1 describes the direct interrogation of individual particles by laser desorption within the ion trap mass spectrometer analyzer. The goals were (1) to develop an ''intelligent trigger'' capable of distinguishing particles of biological origin from those of nonbiological origin in the background and interferent particles and (2) to explore the capability for individual particle identification. Direct interrogation of particles by laser ablation and ion trap mass spectrometry was shown to have good promise for discriminating between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin, although detailed protocols and operating conditions were not worked out. A library of more than 20,000 spectra of various types of biological particles has been assembled. Methods based on multivariate analysis and on neural networks were used to discriminate between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin. It was possible to discriminate between at least some species of bacteria if mass spectra of several hundred similar particles were obtained. Chapter 2 addresses the development of a new ion trap mass analyzer geometry that offers the potential for a significant increase in ion storage capacity for a given set of analyzer operating conditions. This geometry may lead to the development of smaller, lower-power field-portable ion trap mass spectrometers while retaining laboratory-scale analytical performance. A novel ion trap mass spectrometer based on toroidal ion storage geometry has been developed. The analyzer geometry is based on the edge rotation of a quadrupolar ion trap cross section into the shape of a torus. Initial performance of this device was poor, however, due to the significant contribution of nonlinear fields introduced by the rotation of the symmetric ion-trapping geometry. These nonlinear resonances contributed to poor mass resolution and sensitivity and ...
Date: December 18, 2002
Creator: Whitten, W.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

First results with the Microball and Gammasphere

Description: The Microball, an improved 4{pi} multi-detector array, was used recently in conjunction with Gammasphere in three experiments. Highlights of the first results are presented here. The Microball consists of 95 CsI(T{ell}) scintillation detectors with individual Si photodiode readout, arranged in 9 rings. In these first experiments the Microball performed as designed, but the results in new physics exceeded the authors` expectations. They can say with certainty that by its powerful channel selection the Microball enhanced the performance of Gammasphere by one full coincidence fold. This was possible for all exit channels involving charged particle emission, with increasing performance benefit as one progressed to lighter reaction systems. They summarize the essential characteristics of the Microball and give some performance benchmarks. A detailed description of the Microball is given.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Sarantites, D.G.; Hua, P.F. & LaFosse, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The BNL rare kaon decay program

Description: The rare kaon decay program at Brookhaven National Laboratory is reviewed. Results from the last round of experiments are briefly discussed. The three experiments currently collecting data are described. Prospects for future experiments are discussed.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Littenberg, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Prospects for HERMES-spin structure studies at HERA

Description: HERMES (HERA Measurement of Spin), is a second generation experiment to study the spin structure of the nucleon by using polarized internal gas targets in the HERA 35-GeV electron storage ring. Scattered electrons and coincident hadrons will be detected in an open geometry spectrometer which will include particle identification. Measurements are planned for each of the inclusive structure functions, g{sub 1},(x), g{sub 2}(x), b{sub 1}(x) and A(x), as well as the study of semi-inclusive pion and kaon asymmetries. Targets of hydrogen, deuterium and {sup 3}He will be studied. The accuracy of data for the inclusive structure functions will equal or exceed that of current experiments. The semi-inclusive asymmetries will provide a unique and sensitive probe of the flavor dependence of quark helicity distributions and properties of the quark sea. Monte Carlo simulations of HERMES data for experiment asymmetries and polarized structure functions are discussed.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Jackson, H.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Composite particle production in relativistic Au+Au collisions at AGS: First results from the E866 forward spectrometer @ 2, 4, and 10.8 A{center_dot}GeV

Description: Particle spectra were measured for Au + Au collisions at 2, 4, and 10. 8 A{center_dot}GeV using the E866 spectrometers. Recent results on proton emission and composite particle production form the E866 forward spectrometer data taken in 1994 together with the first results from the 1995/6 AGS running period are presented. Preliminary results indicate a decrease in the coalescence scaling coefficient with increasing projectile energy and centrality.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Ashktorab, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interesting aspects of the STAR detector and physics program

Description: The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) is a large acceptance collider detector scheduled to begin operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the fall of 1999. Simply stated, the physics goals of STAR are, (1) to study the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density; (2) to search for signatures of a deconfined partonic phase of matter; and (3) to study the importance of spin as a fundamental property of QCD interactions and measure the spin-dependent parton distributions (gluon, valence quark, sea quark) of the proton. The detector design and methods of accomplishing the physics goals are addressed in this report.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Hallman, T.J. & Collaboration, STAR
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Systematics of mid-rapidity E{sub T} and multiplicity distributions in nucleus and nucleon collisions at AGS energies

Description: In the period 1986--1992, the E802 Collaboration at the BNL-AGS made systematic measurements of transverse energy (E{sub T}) emission in an electromagnetic calorimeter (PbGl) which covered the pseudorapidity interval 1.25 {le} {eta} {le} 2.50 and half the azimuth (where mid-rapidity for these energies is y{sub cm}{sup N N} {approx_equal} 1.6 - 1.7 depending the species). The other half of the azimuth was occupied by a 25 msr magnetic spectrometer with full particle identification. Runs were also taken with two different full-azimuth configurations of the PbGl, covering 1.25 {le} {eta} {le} 2.44, and also 1.3 {le} {eta} {le} 2.4. It was noticed that the shapes of the upper edges of the E{sub T} distributions, as represented for example by the p parameter in a gamma distribution fit, seemed to vary with the solid angle of the configuration. To systematically investigate this effect, the A-dependence and pseudorapidity-interval ({delta}{eta}) dependence of E{sub T} distributions in the half-azimuth electromagnetic calorimeter were measured for p+Be, p+Au, O+Cu, Si+Au and Au+Au collisions.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Tannenbaum, M.J. & Collaboration, E802
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The DHG sum rule measured with medium energy photons

Description: The structure of the nucleon has many important features that are yet to be uncovered. Of current interest is the nucleon spin-structure which can be measured by doing double-polarization experiments with photon beams of medium energies (0.1 to 2 GeV). One such experiment uses dispersion relations, applied to the Compton scattering amplitude, to relate measurement of the total reaction cross section integrated over the incident photon energy to the nucleon anomalous magnetic moment. At present, no single facility spans the entire range of photon energies necessary to test this sum rule. The Laser-Electron Gamma Source (LEGS) facility will measure the double-polarization observables at photon energies between 0.15--0.47 MeV. Either the SPring8 facility, the GRAAL facility (France), or Jefferson Laboratory could make similar measurements at higher photon energies. A high-precision measurement of the spin-polarizability and the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule is now possible with the advent of high-polarization solid HD targets at medium energy polarized photon facilities such as LEGS, GRAAL and SPring8. Other facilities with lower polarization in either the photon beam or target (or both) are also pursuing these measurements because of the high priority associated with this physics. The Spin-asymmetry (SASY) detector that will be used at LEGS has been briefly outlined in this paper. The detector efficiencies have been explored with simulations studies using the GEANT software, with the result that both charged and uncharged pions can be detected with a reasonable efficiency (> 30%) over a large solid angle. Tracking with a TPC, which will be built at LEGS over the next few years, will improve the capabilities of these measurements.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Hicks, K.; Ardashev, K. & Babusci, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detector implications for eletroweak physics at the Tevatron

Description: D0 and CDF are two large, powerful, multipurpose detectors with outstanding tracking, calorimeter and muon systems that have done an excellent job in exploiting the Top Quark, b Quark, QCD, New Phenomena/Exotics and Electroweak Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The upgrades of the D0 and CDF detectors will further enhance their capabilities for physics at the Tevatron. The addition of a magnetic field and silicon vertex chamber will open up new physical opportunities for D0, and the replacement of the plug and forward gas calorimeters with new scintillator based calorimeters will give CDF uniform calorimetry over all {eta}.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Madaras, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The PHENIX experiment at RHIC

Description: The primary goals of the heavy-ion program of the PHENIX collaboration are the detection of the quark-gluon plasma and the subsequent characterization of its physical properties. To address these aims, PHENIX will pursue a wide range of high energy heavy-ion physics topics. The breadth of the physics program represents the expectation that it will require the synthesis of a number of measurements to investigate the physics of the quark-gluon plasma. The broad physics agenda of the collaboration is also reflected in the design of the PHENIX detector itself, which is capable of measuring hadrons, leptons and photons with excellent momentum and energy resolution. PHENIX has chosen to instrument a selective acceptance with multiple detector technologies to provide very discriminating particle identification abilities. Additionally, PHENIX will take advantage of RHIC`s capability to collide beams of polarized protons with a vigorous spin physics program, a subject covered in a separable contribution to these proceedings.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Morrison, D.P.; Akiba, Y.; Alford, O. & Collaboration, PHENIX
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pion and kaon correlations in high energy heavy-ion collisions. Annual report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

Description: Data analysis is in progress for recent experiments performed by the NA44 collaboration with the first running of 160 A GeV {sup 208}Pb-induced reactions at the CERN SPS. Identified singles spectra were taken for pions, kaons, protons, deuterons, antiprotons and antideuterons. Two-pion interferometry measurements were made for semi-central-triggered {sup 208}Pb + Pb collisions. An upgraded multiple-particle spectrometer allows high statistics data sets of identified particles to be collected near mid-rapidity. A second series of experiments will be performed in the fall of 1995 with more emphasis on identical kaon interferometry and on the measurement of rare particle spectra and correlations. Modest instrumentation upgrades by TAMU are designed to increase the trigger function for better impact parameter selection and improved collection efficiency of valid events. An effort to achieve the highest degree of projectile-target stopping is outlined and it is argued that an excitation function on the SPS is needed to better understand reaction mechanisms. Analysis of experimental results is in the final stages at LBL in the EOS collaboration for two-ion interferometry in the 1.2 A GeV Au+Au reaction, taken with full event characterization.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Wolf, K.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental studies of rare K{sup +} decays

Description: Experiment E865 at the BNL AGS is a search for the lepton number violating decay K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}e{sup {minus}} with an expected sensitivity of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}12}. The experimental apparatus involves a magnetic spectrometer with two Cerenkov counters, a calorimeter and a muon detector for particle identification. In addition, other rare K{sup +} decays are studied. The experiment has been collecting data since 1995, and preliminary results are presented.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Appel, R.; Atoyan, G.S. & Bassalleck, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

University of Virginia High Energy Physics Group. Final performance report, June 1, 1989--January 31, 1994

Description: The US Department of Energy Contracts for 1989 covered the initial year of the University of Virginia High Energy Physics Group. The first proposal was submitted in the fall of 1988 and the first allocation of funding was received in June 1989. This first contract which covered the time period June 1, 1989--January 31, 1990 was in the amount of $186,000 and covered UVa HEP group operations and equipment during that period. At that point, a regular contract year was established and two subsequent contracts were issued for February 1, 1990--January 31, 1991 and February 1, 1991--January 31, 992 with awards of $280,000 and $580,000, respectively. The funding between June, 1989 and January, 1992 covered the activities of both the UVa Theory Group (Task A) and the UVa HEP Experimental Group (Task B). Expenditures of all above funds was completed by January 31, 1994. In this time period, certain initial things were accomplished using the operating funds provided by DOE and the seed funds ($2.2 million over the period). There were three main areas of activities, the building of the University of Virginia HEP infrastructure (construction of lab space, computer facilities, electronic shop, machine shop and office space), the hiring of personnel (faculty, post docs, and students) and the physics activities of the group. Much of the physics program of the experimental group revolved around the study of production and decay of heavy flavor. A list of technical papers generated by their work is provided.
Date: December 31, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Charm decays and high energy photoproduction. Final report, April 1994--May 1997

Description: This project involved continued participation by the Physics Department at the Mayaguez Campus of the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) in high energy physics experiments carried out at Fermilab. The UPR is a member of the E831 collaboration which includes Fermilab and leading US, Italian, Brazilian and Korean universities. E831 is an upgrade to the E687 spectrometer with the goal of a tenfold increase in the statistics for the study of the photoproduction and decay of charmed particles. This spectrometer has been significantly upgraded to maintain and expand its capabilities even at considerably higher beam intensities. E687 completed its last data run in January 1992. Approximately 100,000 charm events were fully reconstructed from this data and results of the analysis have appeared in several publications. The UPR has been participating in E687 since 1985 when the experiment was in its early stages of construction. A grant from the DOE Division of High Energy Physics (starting in April 1994) and another from the DOE EPSCoR Program (starting in October 1994) allowed a considerable increase in the activities of the UPR group. Given the group`s capable performance, the responsibilities assigned to it by the collaboration have increased to the point where they now include four major detectors in E831. All four detectors were ready on time for the start of the E831 run in July 1996. This is a remarkable performance if one considers that there is only one senior member in the group and that the students are all MS or undergraduate students. The group has also been active in the development of simulation, data acquisition and analysis software.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Lopez, A. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MEGA -- A search for {mu} {r_arrow} e{gamma}

Description: The MEGA experiment is a search for the decay {mu} {r_arrow} e{gamma}. Even though there is no fundamental reason to expect lepton number to be a conserved quantity, processes such as {mu} {r_arrow} e{gamma} have not been observed. (The present upper limit for the branching ratio for {mu} {r_arrow} e{gamma} is 4.9 x 10{sup {minus}11}.) The minimal standard model of electroweak interactions, which is enormously successful, builds in lepton number conservation. However, the decay {mu} {r_arrow} e{gamma} is expected in many extensions to the standard model, in particular in supersymmetry models. The experimental signature for {mu} {r_arrow} e{gamma} from decays at rest is the observation of a positron and photon, each of 52.8 MeV , that are back-to-back, in time coincidence, and originate from a common spatial point. The MEGA detector consists of two spectrometers designed to measure the kinematic characteristics of positrons and photons to search for events with this signature. The primary difficulty in the analysis of these data has been the development of reconstruction algorithms that balance efficiency and resolution. Also, many calibrations and corrections are needed to get optimum resolutions. Most surviving candidate events are accidentals. Results of analysis are given.
Date: December 1, 1998
Creator: Mischke, R. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recent developments on the STAR detector system at RHIC

Description: The STAR detector system is designed to provide tracking, momentum analysis and particle identification for many of the mid-rapidity charged particles produced in collisions at the RHIC collider. A silicon vertex detector (SVT) provides three layers of tracking near the interaction point. This is followed by the main time projection chamber (TPC), which continues tracking out to 200 cm radial distance from the interaction region. The detector design also includes an electromagnetic calorimeter, various trigger detectors, and radial TPCs in the forward region. The entire system is enclosed in a 0.5 T solenoid magnet. A progress report is given for the various components of the STAR detector system. The authors report on the recent developments in the detector proto-typing and construction, with an emphasis on the main TPC, recent TPC cosmic ray testing and shipping to Brookhaven National Laboratory.
Date: December 1997
Creator: Argonne National Laboratory
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High energy ion collisions. Final technical report, December 14, 1995--March 17, 1997

Description: This grant supported one year of work on Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions at the University of New Mexico. The Principal Investigator, an Adjunct Associate Professor at UNM, recruited a student (Mikhail Kopytine), sent him to CERN for several months to participate in the final data taking period of the NA44 experiment at CERN, then initiated analysis of the data collected during the run. A Hewlett-Packard workstation was purchased and Mr. Kopytine performed calibration, software development, and data analysis using it. A collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and other faculty members at the University of New Mexico was begun, with the goal of working closely together on the PHENIX experiment for RHIC. At this time, a close collaboration continues, centered around the Muon tracking detectors for PHENIX. Station 1 of the tracking system is under construction at UNM, while stations 2 and 3 are the responsibility of LANL. The following accomplishments were made: (1) Participation in final data taking period of NA44; (2) Work on commissioning of aerogel Cerenkov trigger and performed offline analysis to demonstrate its performance; (3) Calibration of the uranium calorimeter in NA44 in preparation for Data Summary Tape production; (4) An optimized DST production for tapes with single pion, kaon, and proton triggers for Pb+Pb collisions was performed; (5) Analysis of pion and kaon distributions and production cross sections from Pb+Pb collisions; and (6) Participation in MVD development meetings and contributed to planning of the analysis software for MVD.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Jacak, B. V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spin physics with the PHENIX detector system

Description: The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has extended its scope to cover spin physics using polarized proton beams. The major goals of the spin physics at RHIC are elucidation of the spin structure of the nucleon and precision tests of the symmetries. Sensitivities of the spin physics measurements with the PHENIX detector system are reviewed.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Saito, N. & Collaboration, PHENIX
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The BRAHMS experiment at RHIC goals and status

Description: The BRAHMS experiment is designed to measure semi-inclusive spectra of charged hadron over a wide range of rapidity. It will yield information on particle production, both at central rapidity and in the baryon rich fragmentation region. Examples of measures for soft as well as for hard physics are presented. The present status of BRAHMS is discussed, as well as the plans for measurements in the first year of running at RHIC.
Date: December 1, 1998
Creator: Videbaek, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Theoretical aspects of light meson spectroscopy

Description: In this pedagogical review the authors discuss the theoretical understanding of light hadron spectroscopy in terms of QCD and the quark model. They begin with a summary of the known and surmised properties of QCD and confinement. Following this they review the nonrelativistic quark potential model for q{anti q} mesons and discuss the quarkonium spectrum and methods for identifying q{anti q} states. Finally, they review theoretical expectations for non-q{anti q} states (glueballs, hybrids and multiquark systems) and the status of experimental candidates for these states.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Barnes, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PHOBOS experiment at RHIC

Description: The study of relativistic heavy nuclei collisions at RHIC opens a new area of physics--the physics of hadronic matter at very high energy densities. The conditions necessary to create a new state of matter, never before seen in the laboratory, may be reached. It gives a chance to study the quantum chromodynamics predictions of the phase transition from hadronic matter to a quark-gluon plasma. The PHOBOS experiment will investigate almost all predicted signals of the QGP formation. General event properties (angular distribution of charged particles, total multiplicity) will be combined with detailed information on particles emitted in the central rapidity region (particle ratios {pi}/K/p, p{sub t} spectra, correlations, {phi} meson properties). Similar studies will be done also in the other three experiments at RHIC, but there are many important observables for which PHOBOS will provide unique information. The multiplicity detector covers almost a full phase space, recording all charged particles with pseudorapidities {vert_bar}{eta}{vert_bar} {le} 5.4. In the PHOBOS spectrometer particles emitted in the central rapidity region will be measured and identified starting from lowest transverse momenta (20 MeV/c for pions). The high rate unbiased trigger gives a chance to see unpredicted phenomena and enables the study of very rare processes that require large statistics. The measurements of the converting photons planned for some runs will be used to study the {pi}{sup 0}/({pi}{sup +} + {pi}{sup {minus}}) ratio in selected phase space intervals.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Wozniak, K. & Collaboration, PHOBOS
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department