3,515 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

The Kevin-Sunburst Oil Field and Other Possibilities of Oil and Gas in the Sweetgrass Arch, Montana

Description: From introduction: The discovery of oil near Kevin, Mont., in March, 1922, gave prominence to the Sweetgrass arch, which is a large structural uplift somewhat similar in size and degree of folding to the Cincinnati arch. Most of the development so far attempted on this fold has been on the Kevin-Sunburst dome, a bulge upon the crest of the arch just south of the Canadian boundary. The dome covers about 16 townships, is nearly circular in outline, and has very low dips away from its highest point in all directions. Within the last five years (1923-1927) about 1,500 wells have been drilled upon it, over 880 of which are rated as productive. Since May, 1925, the field has stood second in production in the Rocky Mountain States being exceeded only by Salt Creek.
Date: 1929
Creator: Collier, Arthur J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tests of Commercial Densimeters for LNG Service

Description: Abstract: Densimeters for liquefied natural gas (LNG) from four manufacturers were tested in liquid methane and an LNG-like mixture of methane, propane, and nitrogen in the density reference system (DRS). The calibration and performance of one type tested for the first time are reported. The stability of the calibrations and performances of three densimeters of a type previously tested have been examined and are also reported here.
Date: June 1982
Creator: Siegwarth, J. D. & LaBrecque, J. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of Crunch-Flow Routines to Constrain Present and Past Carbon Fluxes at Gas-Hydrate Bearing Sites

Description: In November 2012, Oregon State University initiated the project entitled: Application of Crunch-Flow routines to constrain present and past carbon fluxes at gas-hydrate bearing sites. Within this project we developed Crunch-Flow based modeling modules that include important biogeochemical processes that need to be considered in gas hydrate environments. Our modules were applied to quantify carbon cycling in present and past systems, using data collected during several DOE-supported drilling expeditions, which include the Cascadia margin in US, Ulleung Basin in South Korea, and several sites drilled offshore India on the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea. Specifically, we completed modeling efforts that: 1) Reproduce the compositional and isotopic profiles observed at the eight drilled sites in the Ulleung Basin that constrain and contrast the carbon cycling pathways at chimney (high methane flux) and non-chimney sites (low methane, advective systems); 2) Simulate the Ba record in the sediments to quantify the past dynamics of methane flux in the southern Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia margin; and 3) Provide quantitative estimates of the thickness of individual mass transport deposits (MTDs), time elapsed after the MTD event, rate of sulfate reduction in the MTD, and time required to reach a new steady state at several sites drilled in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) Basin off India. In addition we developed a hybrid model scheme by coupling a home-made MATLAB code with CrunchFlow to address the methane transport and chloride enrichment at the Ulleung Basins chimney sites, and contributed the modeling component to a study focusing on pore-scale controls on gas hydrate distribution in sediments from the Andaman Sea. These efforts resulted in two manuscripts currently under review, and contributed the modeling component of another pare, also under review. Lessons learned from these efforts are the basis of a mini-workshop to be held at Oregon State University (Feb 2014) ...
Date: January 31, 2014
Creator: Torres, Marta
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

Description: Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) Continued coordinating the final selection of candidates and field implementation with Oneok. Oneok plans on performing the operations early in 2003.
Date: March 1, 2003
Creator: Reeves, Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

Description: Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) Began preparing final project report, less the field implementation component. (2) Coordinated the final selection of candidates and field implementation with Oneok.
Date: March 1, 2003
Creator: Reeves, Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

Description: Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) The contract was signed on August 20, 2000. Little work has been performed other than preliminary planning to get the project underway.
Date: March 1, 2003
Creator: Reeves, Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

Description: Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) Finished preparing the final project report, less the field implementation component. Sent to DOE for review. (2) Continued coordinating the final selection ...
Date: March 1, 2003
Creator: Reeves, Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

Description: Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: (1) The search for another field site was abandoned after discussion with DOE. There is a clear absence of willing industry partners to ...
Date: March 1, 2003
Creator: Reeves, Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT IN THE MID-CONTINENT

Description: Stripper gas wells are an important source of domestic energy supply and under constant threat of permanent loss (shut-in) due to marginal economics. In 1998, 192 thousand stripper gas wells produced over a Tcf of gas, at an average rate of less than 16 Mcfd. This represents about 57% of all producing gas wells in the onshore lower-48 states, yet only 8% of production. Reserves of stripper gas wells are estimated to be only 1.6 Tcf, or slightly over 1% of the onshore lower-48 total (end of year 1996 data). Obviously, stripper gas wells are at the very margin of economic sustenance. As the demand for natural gas in the U.S. grows to the forecasted estimate of over 30 Tcf annually by the year 2010, supply from current conventional sources is expected to decline. Therefore, an important need exists to fully exploit known domestic resources of natural gas, including those represented by stripper gas wells. The overall objectives of this project are to develop an efficient and low-cost methodology to broadly categorize the well performance characteristics for a stripper gas field, identify the high-potential candidate wells for remediation, and diagnose the specific causes for well underperformance. With this capability, stripper gas well operators can more efficiently and economically produce these resources and maximize these gas reserves. A further objective is to identify/develop, evaluate and test ''new and novel,'' economically viable remediation options. Finally, it is the objective of this project that all the methods and technologies developed in this project, while being tested in the Mid-Continent, be widely applicable to stripper gas wells of all types across the country. The project activities during the reporting period were: Continued coordinating the final selection of candidates and field implementation with Oneok. Oneok plans on performing the operations early in 2003.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Reeves, Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Safety at Gas-Processing Plants

Description: From Summary and introduction: "This report presents up-to-date information on design, construction, operation, and maintenance of natural gasoline and gas-processing plants, with particular emphasis on procedures and practices that will promote maximum safety for workers in such installations."
Date: 1960
Creator: Kintz, G. M. & Hill, Frances C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recent Developments in the Absorption Process for Recovering Gasoline from Natural Gas

Description: From Introduction: "This report gives the results of a study conducted by the Bureau of Mines for the purpose of informing the petroleum industry on the recent progress in the development and application of the absorption process for recovering gasoline from natural gas."
Date: 1919
Creator: Dykema, W. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Leakage from High-Pressure Natural-Gas Transmission Lines

Description: From Scope of Report: "With the cooperation of the Natural Gas Association of America, therefore, the Bureau of Mines has made a scientific study of leakage losses. The fundamental purpose of a study has been to gather information that will aid operating companies in their leakage problems and as a result to conserve natural gas for domestic and industrial consumption instead of allowing it dissipated into the air."
Date: 1928
Creator: Rawlins, E. L. & Wosk, L. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development

Description: Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as ...
Date: March 31, 2012
Creator: Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Hause, Jennifer; Lovett, Raymond; Johnson, David Locke Harry & Patchen, Doug
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Natural Gas Markets: Overview and Policy Issues

Description: This report examines current conditions and trends in the U.S. natural gas markets. Key market elements examined include prices, consumption, production, imports, and infrastructure. Expectations about the future, as reflected in recent official forecasts, are also incorporated here. Furthermore, the report reviews key factors likely to affect market outcomes. These factors include weather, the economy, oil prices, and infrastructure development.
Date: May 23, 2008
Creator: Hederman, William F., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

Description: As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have continued to enhance and streamline our software, and we are testing the final stages of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We are continuing to process this well data and are identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, preparation of the final technical report is underway.
Date: July 1, 2001
Creator: Boyer, Charles M., II & MacDonald, Ronald J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

Description: As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have continued to enhance and streamline our software, and we are testing the final stages of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We are continuing to process this well data and are identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, preparation of the final technical report is underway.
Date: October 1, 2001
Creator: Boyer, Charles M., II & MacDonald, Ronald J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

Description: As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We are currently in the final stages of developing and testing our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We will be processing this well data and identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate these methodologies. Preparation of the final technical report is underway.
Date: April 1, 2001
Creator: Boyer, Charles M., II & MacDonald, Ronald J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Israel's Offshore Natural Gas Discoveries Enhance Its Economic and Energy Outlook

Description: Israel has been dependent on energy imports since it became a nation in 1948, but the recent offshore natural gas discoveries could change that and possibly make Israel an exporter of natural gas. Development of the recently discovered natural gas fields-Tamar, Dalit, and Leviathan- likely will decrease Israel's needs for imported natural gas, imported coal, and possibly imported oil. A switch to natural gas would most likely affect electric generation, but could also improve Israel's trade balance and lessen carbon dioxide emissions.
Date: May 4, 2011
Creator: Ratner, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Subquality natural gas sweetening and dehydration potential of the physical solvent N-formyl-morpholine

Description: Almost all gas produced in the United States requires processing before it is placed in the transmission system. For approximately 50% of the gas, this is just dehydration. The remainder, however, requires processing that is more complex and costly. A report to the Gas Research Institute states that about 30% of the proven gas reserves contained sufficient nitrogen, carbon dioxide or hydrogen sulfide to be classified as a subquality.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Semrau, J.T.; Palla, N. & Lee, A.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

More than just wires : applying complexity theory to communications network assurance.

Description: Complexity Theory is the study of order within otherwise chaotic systems (Holland, 1999). Complexity Theory often focuses on Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS). A CAS is a system of components that interact and reproduce while adapting to their environment. A CAS consists of large numbers of components that are diverse in both form and capability. A CAS exhibits unstable coherence in spite of constant disruptions and a lack of central planning. Large-scale, interconnected infrastructures such as communication networks are CAS. These infrastructures are vastly more dynamic than their predecessors. Such infrastructures consist of a large number of components and participants that are diverse in both form and capability. Furthermore, these infrastructures exhibit unstable coherence in spite of constant disruptions and a lack of central planning. Viewing large-scale, interconnected infrastructures with complex physical architectures, such as communication networks, as CAS can provide many new insights (Bower and Bunn, 2000; North, 2000a, 2000b, and 2001). The CAS approach emphasizes the specific evolution of integrated infrastructures and their participants' behavior, not just simple trends or end states. The adaptation of the infrastructure participants to changing conditions is paramount. Also, the effects of random events and uncertainty are explicitly considered. One powerful computational approach to understanding CAS is agent-based modeling and simulation (ABMS). Applying ABMS to communication networks and the infrastructures upon which they depend may allow such networks to be understood as more than just wires. Communication networks may then be electronically managed as complete, dynamic systems. An example is the integrated, systems-level computational perspective ABMS has provided to electrical and natural gas infrastructure research (North, 2001). This holistic computational perspective may allow both the physical and human dimensions of complex systems such as communication networks to be anticipated and managed on-line, in real time. Thus, ABMS may be an important tool for developing ...
Date: September 5, 2002
Creator: North, M.; Macal, C.; Thomas, W. H.; Miller, D. & Peerenboom, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nitrogen Removal From Low Quality Natural Gas

Description: Natural gas provides more than one-fifth of all the primary energy used in the United States. It is especially important in the residential sector, where it supplies nearly half of all the energy consumed in U.S. homes. However, significant quantities of natural gas cannot be produced economically because its quality is too low to enter the pipeline transportation system without some type of processing, other than dehydration, to remove the undesired gas fraction. Such low-quality natural gas (LQNG) contains significant concentration or quantities of gas other than methane. These non- hydrocarbons are predominantly nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide, but may also include other gaseous components. The nitrogen concentrations usually exceeds 4%. Nitrogen rejection is presently an expensive operation which can present uneconomic scenarios in the potential development of natural gas fields containing high nitrogen concentrations. The most reliable and widely used process for nitrogen rejection from natural gas consists of liquefying the feed stream using temperatures in the order of - 300{degrees}F and separating the nitrogen via fractionation. In order to reduce the gas temperature to this level, the gas is compressed, cooled by mullet-stream heat exchangers, and expanded to low pressure. Significant energy for compression and expensive materials of construction are required. Water and carbon dioxide concentrations must be reduced to levels required to prevent freezing. SRI`s proposed research involves screening new nitrogen selective absorbents and developing a more cost effective nitrogen removal process from natural gas using those compounds. The long-term objective of this project is to determine the technical and economical feasibility of a N{sub 2}2 removal concept based on complexation of molecular N{sub 2} with novel complexing agents. Successful development of a selective, reversible, and stable reagent with an appropriate combination of capacity and N{sub 2} absorption/desorption characteristics will allow selective separation of N{sub 2} ...
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Alvarado, D.B.; Asaro, M.F.; Bomben, J.L.; Damle, A.S. & Bhown, A.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department