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Chemometric Analysis of Two Dimensional Decay Data: Application to {sup 17}O NMR Relaxation Matrices

Description: The use of {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy as a tool to investigate aging in polymer systems has recently been demonstrated. Because the natural abundance of {sup 17}O is extremely low (0.037%), the use of labeled {sup 17}O{sub 2} during the oxidation of polymers produces {sup 17}O NMR spectra whose signals arise entirely from the degradation species (i.e. signals from the bulk or unaged material are not observed). This selective isotopic labeling eliminates the impact of interference from the unaged material, cause (1) above. As discussed by Alam et al. spectral overlap between different degradation species as well as errors in quantification remains a major difficulty in {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy. As a demonstration of the DECRA and CTBSA methods, relaxation matrices obtained from {sup 17}O NMR for model alcohol systems are evaluated. The benefits and limitations of these newly developed chemometric techniques are discussed.
Date: March 18, 1999
Creator: Alam, M.K. & Alam, T.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling the interacting detonation fronts observed by low energy radiography

Description: We have completed a series of experiments in which we made radiographs of interacting detonation fronts in a high explosive. Although the fronts and interactions were observed, the experimental data were insufficient to distinguish between two computer models which we employed to simulate the experiments.
Date: September 18, 1998
Creator: Aufderheide, M; Egan, P O; Morgan, D L & Vantine, H C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Potential Disadvantages of Microtechnology for Future High Consequence Safety Applications

Description: Microtechnologies (e.g., microelectronics, and micromachines) are useful and promising for many applications. However, since the small size and specialized materials of electronics in general and microtechnologies in particular appear to make them sensitive to many normal and abnormal environments, and since complete characterization of the newer technologies is lacking, they must be used with extreme caution in high consequence safety applications. Based on what is now known, we believe that they should not be proposed for high consequence safety applications, particularly for nuclear weapons detonation safety.
Date: December 18, 1998
Creator: Caldwell, M.; Cooper, J.A.; Covan, J.M.; D'Antonio, P.E. & Spray, S.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of fluorescence lifetime diagnostic. Project accomplishments summary (Attachment 1), Revision 1

Description: Fiber-optic-based sensors are excellent candidates for detecting the presence and monitoring the levels of degradation products in stockpiled weapons. Specifically, fluorescence-based sensors are extremely sensitive, can have high specificity for compounds of interest, and are electrically inert. In addition to their applications in the enhanced surveillance program, fiber optic sensors are important for remote sensing, environmental remediation, and medical diagnostics. Optiphase Inc. has developed inexpensive technology for extremely precise measurement of phase shifts of interferometric optical and electrical signals. The company was interested in applying this capability in the rapidly expanding field of fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy, but lacked the expertise and resources associated with fluorescence chemistry and instrumentation. LLNL`s fiber-optic sensor group had significant expertise in these areas, but had previously concentrated its efforts on the chemistry, sensitivity, and selectivity of fluorescence amplitude-based sensors. Stability is a well known issue with this type of sensor whereas lifetime-based sensors exhibit excellent stability, a critical factor for the efficacy of sensors employed in the long-term monitoring of stockpiled weapons. Cooperation with the company afforded LLNL access to enabling, proprietary technology which could simplify and accelerate the transition to the next level of Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP) sensor sophistication, namely fluorescence lifetime based sensors.
Date: February 18, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Broadband acoustic source processing in a noisy shallow ocean environment

Description: Acoustic sources found in the ocean environment are spatially complex and broadband, complicating the analysis of received acoustic data considerably. A model-based approach is developed for a broadband source in a shallow ocean environment characterized by a normal-mode propagation model. Here we develop the optimal Bayesian solution to the broadband pressure-field enhancement and modal function extraction problem.
Date: July 18, 1996
Creator: Candy, J.V. & Sullivan, E.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal stability of PBX-9404, LX03 and LX04

Description: In the Hotcake experiments, PBX-9404 was subjected to various temperature spikes from 202 degrees Centigrade to 268 degrees Centigrade to determine conditions which would result in ignition of the explosive. since that time, measurements have been made of decomposition rates of PBX-9404, LX03, LX04, and pure HMX, at temperatures from about 240 degrees Centigrade to 270 degrees Centigrade. These data have been combined to provide a more accurate definition of the thermal stability of high explosives based on HMX. A set of values of decomposition rates and heats of decomposition has been obtained which is consistent with all previous Hotcake experiments, and will allow predictions of the results of similar experiments with PBX-9404, LX03, and LX04. Computations were made with the Hangfire program on the IBM 7090.
Date: September 18, 1961
Creator: Edwards, A. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

3D Atlas vertical plate oil transmission line field calculations. Final report

Description: Because of questions regarding current density and inductance estimates of the Atlas oil transmission line in the region where the vertical plates connect to the disk line, calculations using the 3D FE program Flux3d were initiated. Flux3d inductance values are nearly that estimated by D. Scudder. Calculations for three base designs of E. Ballard and D. Pierce were completed where several variations for each base design were used to determine the important parameters affecting inductance and to check inductance consistency. Flux3d showed for the first base design a very high current density of 36MA/m at the connection between the vertical and horizontal ground plates resulting in a magnetic pressure of 120 kpsi. The second base design modified this connection to reduce the current density to 20MA/m and 36 kpsi and for design 3 current density is 17MA/m. Maximum current density on the hot plates is 20MA/m for all 3 designs. These values assumed 1.2MA per VTL or 45.6MA total system current. Electrical fields on the top of the hot plate near the disk line connection is about 50% greater than the nominal value near the center of the vertical plates.
Date: September 18, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report of Official Foreign Travel to Germany, May 16-June 1, 2001

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) and associated agencies have moved rapidly toward electronic production, management, and dissemination of scientific and technical information. The World-Wide Web (WWW) has become a primary means of information dissemination. Electronic commerce (EC) is becoming the preferred means of procurement. DOE, like other government agencies, depends on and encourages the use of international standards in data communications. Like most government agencies, DOE has expressed a preference for openly developed standards over proprietary designs promoted as ''standards'' by vendors. In particular, there is a preference for standards developed by organizations such as the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) that use open, public processes to develop their standards. Among the most widely adopted international standards is the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML, ISO 8879:1986, FIPS 152), to which DOE long ago made a commitment. Besides the official commitment, which has resulted in several specialized projects, DOE makes heavy use of coding derived from SGML: Most documents on the WWW are coded in HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), which is an application of SGML. The World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C), with the backing of major software houses like Adobe, IBM, Microsoft, Netscape, Oracle, and Sun, is promoting XML (eXtensible Markup Language), a class of SGML applications, for the future of the WWW and the basis for EC. In support of DOE's use of these standards, I have served since 1985 as Chairman of the international committee responsible for SGML and related standards, ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34 (SC34) and its predecessor organizations. During my May 2001 trip, I chaired the spring 2001 meeting of SC34 in Berlin, Germany. I also attended XML Europe 2001, a major conference on the use of SGML and XML sponsored by the Graphic Communications Association (GCA), and chaired a meeting of the ...
Date: June 18, 2001
Creator: Mason, J. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stability of Trilateral Forces: III, Large Unsymmetric Forces

Description: For large unsymmetric forces, at few weapons permissile all forces are reserved, costs are constant, and configurations are stable. At many weapons permissile, no weapons are reserved, and stability degrades. For small unequal forces, the equal sides ignore the smaller forces and deter each other as in bilinear engagements. For large unequal forces, the equal sides ignore each other, commit all forces to the unequal side, and stability indices approach those observed for large triads.
Date: September 18, 1998
Creator: Canavan, G. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) Munition Classification System enhancements. Final report

Description: Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a non-destructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technology has resulted in three generations of instrumentation, funded by the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), specifically designed for field identification of chemical weapon (CW) munitions. Each generation of ARS instrumentation was developed with a specific user in mind. The ARS1OO was built for use by the U.N. Inspection Teams going into Iraq immediately after the Persian Gulf War. The ARS200 was built for use in the US-Russia Bilateral Chemical Weapons Treaty (the primary users for this system are the US Onsite Inspection Agency (OSIA) and their Russian counterparts). The ARS300 was built with the requirements of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in mind. Each successive system is an improved version of the previous system based on learning the weaknesses of each and, coincidentally, on the fact that more time was available to do a requirements analysis and the necessary engineering development. The ARS300 is at a level of development that warrants transferring the technology to a commercial vendor. Since LANL will supply the computer software to the selected vendor, it is possible for LANL to continue to improve the decision algorithms, add features where necessary, and adjust the user interface before the final transfer occurs. This paper describes the current system, ARS system enhancements, and software enhancements. Appendices contain the Operations Manual (software Version 3.01), and two earlier reports on enhancements.
Date: September 18, 1997
Creator: Vela, O.A. & Huggard, J.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 485: Cactus Spring Ranch Pu and DU Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

Description: This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 485: Cactus Spring Ranch Plutonium (Pu) and Depleted Uranium (DU) Site, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located at the Cactus Spring Ranch on the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, CAU 485 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) TA-39-001-TAGR. This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary for CAU 485. The Corrective Action Decision Document and Closure Report have been combined into one report because sample data collected during the preliminary assessment investigation (PAI) performed in January and February 1998 showed no evidence of contamination at the site. In the past, this CAU included holding pens which housed sheep and burros used to test inhalation uptake from atmospheric releases of Pu and DU, and the animals were sacrificed after the tests. Specifically, the investigation focused on data to determine: if surface activities of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides were present; if potential contaminants of concern (COCs) such as Pu and DU were present; and if plutonium was present in the soil and dung at levels significantly above background levels. Investigation results concluded that surface radiological activities of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides were within range of typical background levels. Evaluation of process knowledge determined plutonium to be the only potential COC, but soil and dung samples tested were not positive for plutonium-238 and only two samples had positive concentrations of plutonium 239/240 (subsequent plutonium alpha spectroscopy results demonstrated that there was no plutonium contamination in the Cactus Spring surface soil or dung). Therefore, the DOE/NV recommended that no corrective action was required at CAU 485; further, no Corrective Action Plan was required. No use restrictions were required to be ...
Date: September 18, 1998
Creator: United States. Department of Energy. Nevada Operations Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inspection record card, W71, Type 5-2 Serial Number L773

Description: This paper consists of the inspection record of a W71 Type 5-2 weapon, Serial No. L773. The inspector determined that the unit does not contain material capable of a nuclear explosion and does not contain high explosives. The mock-up/test weapon was inspected in June, 1974 and limited life components were manufactured in February, 1972.
Date: June 18, 1974
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LDRD final report: photonic analog-to-digital converter (ADC) technology

Description: We report on an LDRD seed program of novel technology development (started by an FY98 Engineering Tech-base project) that will enable extremely high-fidelity analog-to-digital converters for a variety of national security missions. High speed (l0+ GS/s ), high precision (l0+ bits) ADC technology requires extremely short aperture times ({approx}1ps ) with very low jitter requirements (sub 10fs ). These fundamental requirements, along with other technological barriers, are difficult to realize with electronics: However, we outline here, a way to achieve these timing apertures using a novel multi-wavelength optoelectronic short-pulse optical source. Our approach uses an optoelectronic feedback scheme with high optical Q to produce an optical pulse train with ultra-low jitter ( sub 5fs) and high amplitude stability (<10{sup 10}). This approach requires low power and can be integrated into an optoelectronic integrated circuit to minimize the size. Under this seed program we have demonstrated that the optical feedback mechanism can be used to generate a high Q resonator. This has reduced the technical risk for further development, making it an attractive candidate for outside funding.
Date: February 18, 1999
Creator: Bowers, M; Deri, B; Haigh, R; Lowry, M; Sargis, P; Stafford, R et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Capabilities, activities and resource of Mound laboratory

Description: Mound Laboratory, Miamisburg, Ohio is operated by Monsanto Research Corporation and is responsible to the Albuquerque Operations Office. It is an integrated production and laboratory facility which performs production and process development for weapons programs and conducts research and development for several other ERDA programs. Its missions are directed toward explosives and nuclear technologies. Total authorized plant and equipment is valued at $105.3 million. Gross operating funds for FY 1975 are estimated at $42.5 million. FY 1975 employment at midyear was 1,699. This paper provides an overview of the staff and technical qualifications, and technical capabilities of the Mound Laboratory.
Date: March 18, 1975
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Industrial Sites Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4)

Description: This Leachfield Corrective Action Units (CAUs) Work Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Under the FFACO, a work plan is an optional planning document that provides information for a CAU or group of CAUs where significant commonality exists. A work plan may be developed that can be referenced by leachfield Corrective Action Investigation Plans (CAIPs) to eliminate redundant CAU documentation. This Work Plan includes FFACO-required management, technical, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management documentation common to several CAUs with similar site histories and characteristics, namely the leachfield systems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TT R). For each CAU, a CAIP will be prepared to present detailed, site-specific information regarding contaminants of potential concern (COPCs), sampling locations, and investigation methods.
Date: December 18, 1998
Creator: /NV, DOE
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detainee Provisions in the National Defense Authorization Bills

Description: This report offers a brief background of the salient issues raised by H.R. 1540 and S. 1867 regarding detention matters, provides a section-by-section analysis of the relevant subdivision of each bill, and compares the bills' approaches with respect to the major issues they address.
Date: November 18, 2011
Creator: Elsea, Jennifer K. & Garcia, Michael John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detainee Provisions in the National Defense Authorization Bills

Description: This report offers a brief background of the salient issues raised by H.R. 1540 and S. 1867 regarding detention matters, provides a section-by-section analysis of the relevant subdivision of each bill, and compares the bills' approaches with respect to the major issues they address.
Date: July 18, 2011
Creator: Elsea, Jennifer K. & Garcia, Michael John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of Prime Movers Suitable for USMC Expeditionary Power Sources

Description: This report documents the results of the ORNL investigation into prime movers that would be desirable for the construction of a power system suitable for the United States Marine Corps (USMC) expeditionary forces under Operational Maneuvers From The Sea (OMFTS) doctrine. Discrete power levels of {approx}1, 5, 15, and 30 kW are considered. The only requirement is that the prime mover consumes diesel fuel. A brief description is given for the prime movers to describe their basic scientific foundations and relative advantages and disadvantages. A list of key attributes developed by ORNL has been weighted by the USMC to indicate the level of importance. A total of 14 different prime movers were scored by ORNL personnel in four size ranges (1,5, 15, & 30 kW) for their relative strength in each attribute area. The resulting weighted analysis was used to indicate which prime movers are likely to be suitable for USMC needs. No single engine or prime mover emerged as the clear-cut favorite but several engines scored as well or better than the diesel engine. At the higher load levels (15 & 30 kW), the results indicate that the open Brayton (gas turbine) is a relatively mature technology and likely a suitable choice to meet USMC needs. At the lower power levels, the situation is more difficult and the market alone is not likely to provide an optimum solution in the time frame desired (2010). Several prime movers should be considered for future developments and may be satisfactory; specifically, the Atkinson cycle, the open Brayton cycle (gas turbine), the 2-stroke diesel. The rotary diesel and the solid oxide fuel cell should be backup candidates. Of all these prime movers, the Atkinson cycle may well be the most suitable for this application but is an immature technology. Additional demonstrations of this ...
Date: April 18, 2000
Creator: Theiss, T.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, July 2002, Rev. No. 0

Description: This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 140 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 140 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-08-01, Detonation Pits; 05-08-02, Debris Pits; 05-17-01, Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site (Buried); 05-19-01, Waste Disposal Site; 05-23-01, Gravel Gertie; 05-35-01, Burn Pit; 05-99-04, Burn Pit; 22-99-04, Radioactive Waste Dump; 23-17-01, Hazardous Waste Storage Area. All nine of these CASs are located within Areas 5, 22, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. This CAU is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The NTS has been used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. The CASs in CAU 140 were used for testing, material storage, waste storage, and waste disposal. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution criteria and resolve the decision statements. Phase I will determine if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels. This data will be evaluated at all CASs. Phase II will determine the extent of the contaminant(s) of concern (COCs). This data will only be evaluated for CASs with a COC identified during Phase I. Based on process knowledge, the COPCs for CAU 140 include volatile organics, semivolatile organics, petroleum hydrocarbons, explosive residues, herbicides, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. The results of this ...
Date: July 18, 2002
Creator: /NV, NNSA
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Homeland Security: Establishment and Implementation of the United States Northern Command

Description: This report discusses the U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM), which was established by the Department of Defense (DOD) to fight terrorism at home. Significant organizational and procedural progress has been made in setting up this organization. However, questions remain concerning interagency relationships and information sharing.
Date: August 18, 2006
Creator: Bowman, Steven R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Research on gas transport in chimneys: a progress report

Description: The results of the AGRINI and TIERRA experiments have led us to study three general topics: collapse phenomenology, CO/sub 2/ content measurement, and gas transport in chimneys. Our results so far are fragmentary, but we have been able to come to some tentative conclusions: (1) a layer of strong material between depths of 24 and 32 m, and perhaps some relatively strong material deeper, may have caused the AGRINI crater shape. This layer was absent at the nearby LABAN and CROWDIE events. We were unable to locate the layer with a surface penetrometer or surface seismic methods, but it may be possible to measure strength vs depth in situ by examining the penetration depth of a projectile. (2) We can probably improve our knowledge of the in situ CO/sub 2/ content by calibrating a commercial carbon/oxygen logging system for NTS conditions. (3) It is possible to measure the response of the gas in a chimney to changes in atmospheric pressure. There can be significantly different gas transport in chimneys with the same pressure response, depending on the porosity and the distribution of the porosity. It is possible to perform an inexpensive experiment to study the gas transport in an existing chimney.
Date: March 18, 1986
Creator: Hearst, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department