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Effects of surface condition on the corrosion of candidate structural materials in a simulated HTGR-GT environment

Description: A simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) helium environment was used to study the effects of surface finish conditions on the subsequent elevated-temperature corrosion behavior of key candidate structural materials. The environment contained helium with 500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2//50 ..mu..atm CO/50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4//<0.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O at 900/sup 0/C with total test exposure durations of 3000 hours. Specimens with lapped, grit-blasted, pickled, and preoxidized surface conditions were studied. Materials tested included two cast superalloys, IN 100 and IN 713LC; one centrifugally cast high-temperature alloy, HK 40 one oxice-dispersion-strengthened alloy, Inconel MA 754; and three wrought high-temperature alloys, Hastelloy Alloy X, Inconel Alloy 617, and Alloy 800H.
Date: February 1, 1980
Creator: Thompson, L.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of proposed German safety criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

Description: This work reviews proposed safety criteria prepared by the German Bundesministerium des Innern (BMI) for future licensing of gas-cooled high-temperature reactor (HTR) concepts in the Federal Republic of Germany. Comparison is made with US General Design Criteria (GDCs) in 10CFR50 Appendix A and with German light water reactor (LWR) criteria. Implications for the HTR design relative to the US design and safety approach are indicated. Both inherent characteristics and design features of the steam cycle, gas turbine, and process heat concepts are taken into account as well as generic design options such as a pebble bed or prismatic core.
Date: May 1, 1980
Creator: Barsell, A.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HTGR Gas Turbine Program. Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1979

Description: Information on the HTGR-GT program is presented concerning systems design methods; systems dynamics methods; alternate design; miscellaneous controls and auxiliary systems; structural mechanics; shielding analysis; licensing; safety; availability; reactor turbine system integration with plant; PCRV liners, penetrations, and closures; PCRV structures; thermal barrier; reactor internals; turbomachinery; turbomachine remote maintenance; control valve; heat exchangers; plant protection system; and plant control system.
Date: May 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-temperature gas-cooled reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume IV

Description: Information is presented concerning medium-enriched uranium/thorium once-through fuel cycle; medium-enrichment uranium-233/thorium recycle fuel; high-enrichment uranium-235/thorium recycle (spiked) fuel cycle; high-enrichment uranium-233/thorium recycle (spiked) fuel cycle; and gas-turbine high-temperature gas-cooled reactor.
Date: January 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle description

Description: The Nonproliferation Alterntive Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates.
Date: June 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, July 1, 1979-September 30, 1979

Description: The results of work performed from July 1, 1979 through September 30, 1979 on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program are presented. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment, and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The status of the data management system is presented. In addition, the progress in the screening test program is described.
Date: March 7, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gas-cooled reactor programs: High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Base-Technology Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

Description: Progress in HTGR studies is reported in the following areas: HTGR chemistry; fueled graphite development; prestressed concrete pressure vessel development; structural materials; HTGR graphite studies; and evaluation of the pebble-bed HTR.
Date: July 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

Description: The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.
Date: December 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-temperature gas reactor (HTGR) market assessment, synthetic fuels analysis

Description: This study is an update of assessments made in TRW's October 1979 assessment of overall high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) markets in the future synfuels industry (1985 to 2020). Three additional synfuels processes were assessed. Revised synfuel production forecasts were used. General environmental impacts were assessed. Additional market barriers, such as labor and materials, were researched. Market share estimates were used to consider the percent of markets applicable to the reference HTGR size plant. Eleven HTGR plants under nominal conditions and two under pessimistic assumptions are estimated for selection by 2020. No new HTGR markets were identified in the three additional synfuels processes studied. This reduction in TRW's earlier estimate is a result of later availability of HTGR's (commercial operation in 2008) and delayed build up in the total synfuels estimated markets. Also, a latest date for HTGR capture of a synfuels market could not be established because total markets continue to grow through 2020. If the nominal HTGR synfuels market is realized, just under one million tons of sulfur dioxide effluents and just over one million tons of nitrous oxide effluents will be avoided by 2020. Major barriers to a large synfuels industry discussed in this study include labor, materials, financing, siting, and licensing. Use of the HTGR intensifies these barriers.
Date: August 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of thermally sprayed coatings for high-temperature wear-protection applications

Description: Under normal high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating conditions, faying surfaces of metallic components under high contact pressure are prone to friction, wear, and self-welding damage. Component design calls for coatings for the protection of the mating surfaces. Anticipated operating temperatures up to 850 to 950/sup 0/C (1562 to 1742/sup 0/F) and a 40-y design life require coatings with excellent thermal stability and adequate wear and spallation resistance, and they must be compatible with the HTGR coolant helium environment. Plasma and detonation-gun (D-gun) deposited chromium carbide-base and stabilized zirconia coatings are under consideration for wear protection of reactor components such as the thermal barrier, heat exchangers, control rods, and turbomachinery. Programs are under way to address the structural integrity, helium compatibility, and tribological behavior of relevant sprayed coatings. In this paper, the need for protection of critical metallic components and the criteria for selection of coatings are discussed. The technical background to coating development and the experience with the steam cycle HTGR (HTGR-SC) are commented upon. Coating characterization techniques employed at General Atomic Company (GA) are presented, and the progress of the experimental programs is briefly reviewed. In characterizing the coatings for HTGR applications, it is concluded that a systems approach to establish correlation between coating process parameters and coating microstructural and tribological properties for design consideration is required.
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Li, C.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison between instrumented precracked Charpy and compact specimen tests of carbon steels

Description: The General Atomic Company High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is housed within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Various carbon steel structural members serve as closures at penetrations in the vessel. A program of testing and evaluation is underway to determine the need for reference fracture toughness (K/sub IR/) and indexing procedures for these materials as described in Appendix G to Section III, ASME Code for light water reactor steels. The materials of interest are carbon steel forgings (SA508, Class 1) and plates (SA537, Classes 1 and 2) as well as weldments of these steels. The fracture toughness behavior is characterized with instrumented precracked Charpy V-votch specimens (PCVN) - slow-bend and dynamic - and compact specimens (10-mm and 25-mm thicknesses) using both linear elastic (ASTM E399) and elastic-plastic (equivalent Energy and J-Integral) analytical procedures. For the dynamic PCVN tests, force-time traces are analyzed according to the procedures of the Pressure Vessel Research Council (PVRC)/Metal Properties Council (MPC). Testing and analytical procedures are discussed and PCVN results are compared to those obtained with compact specimens.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Nanstad, R.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design of the HTGR for process heat applications

Description: This paper discusses a design study of an advanced 842-MW(t) HTGR with a reactor outlet temperature of 850/sup 0/C (1562/sup 0/F), coupled with a chemical process whose product is hydrogen (or a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) generated by steam reforming of a light hydrocarbon mixture. This paper discusses the plant layout and design for the major components of the primary and secondary heat transfer systems. Typical parametric system study results illustrate the capability of a computer code developed to model the plant performance and economics.
Date: May 1, 1980
Creator: Vrable, D.L. & Quade, R.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

GCRA review and appraisal of HTGR reactor-core-design program. [HTGR-SC, -R, -NHSDR]

Description: The reactor-core-design program has as its principal objective and responsibility the design and resolution of major technical issues for the reactor core and core components on a schedule consistent with the plant licensing and construction program. The task covered in this review includes three major design areas: core physics, core thermal and hydraulic performance fuel element design, and in-core fuel performance evaluation.
Date: September 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, April 1, 1979-June 30, 1979

Description: The results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Work covered in this report includes the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment, and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The status of the data management system is presented. In addition, the progress in the screening test program is described.
Date: January 25, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Licensing topical report: interpretation of general design criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

Description: This Licensing Topical Report presents a set of General Design Criteria (GDC) which is proposed for applicability to licensing of graphite-moderated, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Modifications as necessary to reflect HTGR characteristics and design practices have been made to the GDC derived for applicability to light-water-cooled reactors and presented in Appendix A of Part 50, Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, including the Introduction, Definitions, and Criteria. It is concluded that the proposed set of GDC affords a better basis for design and licensing of HTGRs.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Orvis, D.D. & Raabe, P.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Irradiation performance of HTGR fuel rods in HFIR experiments HRB-11 and -12

Description: Capsules HRB-11 and -12 were irradiated in support of development of weak-acid-resin-derived recycle fuel for the high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel cycle for the HTGR. Fissil fuel particles with initial oxygen-to-metal ratios between 1.0 and 1.7 performed acceptably to full burnup for HEU fuel. Particles with ratios below 1.0 showed excessive chemical interaction between rare earth fission products and the SiC layer.
Date: June 1, 1980
Creator: Homan, F.J.; Tiegs, T.N.; Kania, M.J.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Thoms, K.R.; Robbins, J.M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Licensing topical report: the measurement and modelling of time-dependent fission product release from failed HTGR fuel particles under accident conditions

Description: The release of fission products from failed fuel particles was measured under simulated accident (core heatup) conditions. A generic model and specific model parameters that describe delayed fission product release from the kernels of failed HTGR fuel particles were developed from the experimental results. The release of fission products was measured from laser-failed BISO ThO/sub 2/ and highly enriched (HEU) TRISO UC/sub 2/ particles that had been irradiated to a range of kernel burnups. The burnups were 0.25, 1.4, and 15.7% FIMA for ThO/sub 2/ particles and 23.5 and 74% FIMA for UC/sub 2/ particles. The fission products measured were nuclides of xenon, iodine, krypton, tellurium, and cesium.
Date: April 1, 1980
Creator: Myers, B.F. & Morrissey, R.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel-cycle costs for alternative fuels

Description: This paper compares the fuel cycle cost and fresh fuel requirements for a range of nuclear reactor systems including the present day LWR without fuel recycle, an LWR modified to obtain a higher fuel burnup, an LWR using recycle uranium and plutonium fuel, an LWR using a proliferation resistant /sup 233/U-Th cycle, a heavy water reactor, a couple of HTGRs, a GCFR, and several LMFBRs. These reactor systems were selected from a set of 26 developed for the NASAP study and represent a wide range of fuel cycle requirements.
Date: January 1, 1980
Creator: Rainey, R.H.; Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J. & Unger, W.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of a vertical continuous centrifuge for clarification of HTGR dissolver slurries

Description: A series of statistically designed centrifuge performance tests was conducted to evaluate the solid-liquid separation efficiency of a vertical continuous centrifuge. Test results show that 100% of the particles greater than 4 microns in diameter were removed from simulated HTGR fuel reprocessing dissolver solutions. Centrifugal force and liquid density are the principal variables affecting separation efficiency.
Date: March 1, 1980
Creator: Olguin, L.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fission product Pd-SiC interaction in irradiated coated particle fuels

Description: Silicon carbide is the main barrier to fission product release from coated particle fuels. Consequently, degradation of the SiC must be minimized. Electron microprobe analysis has identified that palladium causes corrosion of the SiC in irradiated coated particles. Further ceramographic and electron microprobe examinations on irradiated particles with kernels ranging in composition from UO/sub 2/ to UC/sub 2/, including PuO/sub 2 -x/ and mixed (Th, Pu) oxides, and in enrichment from 0.7 to 93.0% /sup 235/U revealed that temperature is the major factor affecting the penetration rate of SiC by Pd. The effects of kernel composition, Pd concentration, other fission products, and SiC properties are secondary.
Date: April 1, 1980
Creator: Tiegs, T.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA): an integrated system for HTGR coated particle fuel performance assessment

Description: The Irradiated-Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA) System, designed and built at ORNL, provides the capability of making statistically accurate failure fraction measurements on irradiated HTGR coated particle fuel. The IMGA records the gamma-ray energy spectra from fuel particles and performs quantitative analyses on these spectra; then, using chemical and physical properties of the gamma emitters it makes a failed-nonfailed decision concerning the ability of the coatings to retain fission products. Actual retention characteristics for the coatings are determined by measuring activity ratios for certain gamma emitters such as /sup 137/Cs//sup 95/Zr and /sup 144/Ce//sup 95/Zr for metallic fission product retention and /sup 134/Cs//sup 137/Cs for an indirect measure of gaseous fission product retention. Data from IMGA (which can be put in the form of n failures observed in N examinations) can be accurately described by the binomial probability distribution model. Using this model, a mathematical relationship between IMGA data (n,N), failure fraction, and confidence level was developed. To determine failure fractions of less than or equal to 1% at confidence levels near 95%, this model dictates that from several hundred to several thousand particles must be examined. The automated particle handler of the IMGA system provides this capability. As a demonstration of failure fraction determination, fuel rod C-3-1 from the OF-2 irradiation capsule was analyzed and failure fraction statistics were applied. Results showed that at the 1% failure fraction level, with a 95% confidence level, the fissile particle batch could not meet requirements; however, the fertile particle exceeded these requirements for the given irradiation temperature and burnup.
Date: February 1, 1980
Creator: Kania, M.J. & Valentine, K.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department