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CHANGING RELEASE CRITERIA FROM PAST TO PRESENT

Description: Beginning with the decommissioning of nuclear power plants the release, criteria for radioactive materials has gained importance significantly. After decommissioning and dismantling, most of the residues need not be treated as radioactive waste, since they contain only small amounts of radioactivity. The Karlsruhe Research Center already dismantled two research reactors completely (the Karlstein Super Heated Steam Reactor and the Niederaichbach Nuclear Power Plant), while several additional decommissioning projects are currently in progress. About 70 % of the total waste mass within each project can be released from the area of atomic regulations and licenses. At the Niederaichbach and Karlstein sites the release procedures and the release criteria were determined in the decommissioning license, where issues such as controlling and release values were fixed. Additionally, each step of the release process has to be coordinated with the regulator. Today the general release criteria are contained in the atomic act. Depending on the nature of the material to be released (e.g. building structures or metallic waste), and depending on the further use of the material, such as unrestricted reuse or waste disposal, release values for each nuclide are established. To prepare the release of materials, a release plan including the release measurement results is sent to the regulator, who has to officially approve the concept.
Date: February 27, 2003
Creator: Graf, A. & Valencia, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Civilian nuclear power on the drawing board: the development of Experimental Breeder Reactor-II.

Description: On September 28, 2001 a symposium was held at Argonne National Laboratory as part of the festivities to mark the 100th birthday of Enrico Fermi. The symposium celebrated Fermi's ''contribution to the development of nuclear power'' and focused on one particular ''line of development'' resulting from Fermi's interest in power reactors: Argonne's fast reactor program. Symposium participants made many references to the ways in which the program was linked to Fermi, who led the team which created the world's first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction. For example, one presentation featured an April, 1944 memo that described a meeting attended by Fermi and others. The memo came from the time when research on plutonium and the nuclear chain reaction at Chicago's WWII Metallurgical Laboratory was nearing its end. Even as other parts of the Manhattan Engineering Project were building on this effort to create the bombs that would end the war, Fermi and his colleagues were taking the first steps to plan the use of nuclear energy in the postwar era. After noting that Fermi ''viewed the use of [nuclear] power for the heating of cities with sympathy,'' the group outlined several power reactor designs. In the course of discussion, Fermi and his colleagues took the first steps in conjuring the vision that would later be brought to life with Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) and Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), the celebrated achievements of the Argonne fast reactor program. Group members considered various schemes for a breeder reactor in which the relatively abundant U-238 would be placed near a core of fissionable material. The reactor would be a fast reactor; that is, neutrons would not be moderated, as were most wartime reactors. Thus, the large number of neutrons emitted in fast neutron fission would hit the U-238 and create ''extra'' fissionable ...
Date: February 20, 2003
Creator: Westfall, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

University of Virginia Reactor Facility Decommissioning Results

Description: The University of Virginia Reactor Facility started accelerated decommissioning in 2002. The facility consists of two licensed reactors, the CAVALIER and the UVAR. This paper will describe the progress in 2002, remaining efforts and the unique organizational structure of the project team.
Date: February 24, 2003
Creator: Ervin, P. F.; Lundberg, L. A.; Benneche, P. E.; Mulder, R. U. & Steva, D. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Substantial Variability Exists in Utilities' Nuclear Decommissioning Funding Adequacy: Baseline Trends (1997-2001); and Scenario and Sensitivity Analyses (Year 2001)

Description: This paper explores the trends over 1997-2001 in my baseline simulation analysis of the sufficiency of electric utilities' funds to eventually decommission the nation's nuclear power plants. Further, for 2001, I describe the utilities' funding adequacy results obtained using scenario and sensitivity analyses, respectively. In this paper, I focus more on the wide variability observed in these adequacy measures among utilities than on the results for the ''average'' utility in the nuclear industry. Only individual utilities, not average utilities -- often used by the nuclear industry to represent its funding adequacy -- will decommission their nuclear plants. Industry-wide results tend to mask the varied results for individual utilities. This paper shows that over 1997-2001, the variability of my baseline decommissioning funding adequacy measures (in percentages) for both utility fund balances and current contributions has remained very large, reflected in the sizable ranges and frequency distributions of these percentages. The relevance of this variability for nuclear decommissioning funding adequacy is, of course, focused more on those utilities that show below ideal balances and contribution levels. Looking backward, 42 of 67 utility fund (available) balances, in 2001, were above (and 25 below) their ideal baseline levels; in 1997, 42 of 76 were above (and 34 below) ideal levels. Of these, many utility balances were far above, and many far below, such ideal levels. The problem of certain utilities continuing to show balances much below ideal persists even with increases in the adequacy of ''average'' utility balances.
Date: February 26, 2003
Creator: Williams, D. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Extraction of Heavy Metals by Means of a New Electrolytic Method

Description: The extraction of metals in known metallurgical methods is pursued on the basis of separating as much as possible the desired metal's content from the ore concentrate, in the most economical manner. When these principles are also applied to the extraction of heavy metals, the related environmental factors do not readily meet with requirements. Today, an acceptable extraction technology for metals must satisfy the need to produce the deep separation of metals from their source in both economical and environmentally safe manner. This pertains to the direction of our ongoing research and development, among others in the field of environmental remediation. Earlier, we successfully addressed in an environmentally safe manner the selective extraction of radioactive isotopes from liquid radioactive wastes, produced at Armenia's Metzamor Nuclear Power Plant and implemented a functioning LRW station at the NPP. Currently, we extended our new electrodialysis-based electrolytic method in a laboratory scale, for the extraction and deep separation of different metals, including the heavy metals. Our new method, its efficiency, economy and full compliance with environmental issues will be presented.
Date: February 25, 2003
Creator: Guiragossian, Z. G.; Martoyan, G. A.; Injeyan, S. G.; Tonikyan, S. G. & Nalbandyan, G. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Belgoprocess Strategy Relating to the Management of Materials from Decommissioning

Description: Belgium started its nuclear program quite early. The first installations were constructed in the fifties, and presently, more than 55 % of the Belgian electricity production is provided by nuclear power plants. After 30 years of nuclear experience, Belgium started decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the eighties with two main projects: the BR3-PWR plant and the Eurochemic reprocessing plant. The BR3-decommissioning project is carried out at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, while the decommissioning of the former Eurochemic reprocessing plant is managed and operated by Belgoprocess n.v., which is also operating the centralized waste treatment facilities and the interim storage for Belgian radioactive waste. Some fundamental principles have to be considered for the management of materials resulting from the decommissioning of nuclear installations, equipment and/or components, mainly based on the guidelines of the ''IAEA-Safety Fundamentals. The Principles of Radioactive Waste Management. Safety Series No. 111-F, IAEA, Vienna, 1995'' with respect to radioactive waste management. Two of the fundamental principles indicated in this document are specifically dealing with the strategy for the management of materials from decommissioning, ''Generation of radioactive waste shall be kept to the minimum practicable'' (seventh principle), and ''Radioactive waste shall be managed in such a way that it will not impose undue burdens on future generations'' (fifth principle). Based on these fundamental principles, Belgoprocess has made a straightforward choice for a strategy with minimization of the amount of materials to be managed as radioactive waste. This objective is obtained through the use of advanced decontamination techniques and the unconditional release of decontaminated materials. Unconditionally released materials are recycled, such as i.e., metal materials that are removed to conventional melting facilities, or are removed to conventional industrial disposal sites if they have no remaining value. In order to achieve these objectives, Belgoprocess uses techniques and equipment that enable ...
Date: February 27, 2003
Creator: Teunckens, L.; Lewandowski, P.; Walthery, R. & B., Ooms.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The future of reactor neutrino experiments: A novel approach to measuring theta{sub 13}

Description: Results from non-accelerator neutrino oscillation experiments have provided evidence for the oscillation of massive neutrinos. The subdominant oscillation, the coupling of the electron neutrino flavor to the third mass eigenstate, has not been measured yet. The size of this coupling U{sub e3} and its corresponding mixing angle theta{sub 13} are critical for CP violation searches in the lepton sector and will define the future of accelerator neutrino physics. The current best limit on U{sub e3} comes from the CHOOZ reactor neutrino disappearance experiment. In this talk we review proposals for future measurements of theta-13 with reactor antineutrinos.
Date: August 24, 2003
Creator: Heeger, Karsten M.; Freedman, Stuart J. & Luk, Kam-Biu
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydrodynamic phenomena of gas-filled chamber due to target implosion in fusion reactors.

Description: Use of an intermediate gas in the reaction chamber of an inertial fusion power reactor is under consideration to decrease the thermal shock to the walls resulting from target implosions. A model was developed and implemented in HEIGHTS package to simulate hydrodynamic and radiation shock waves in the chamber and used to determine the effect of xenon gas at various densities ranging from mtorr up to tens of torr. Numerical calculations for the dense-gas case indicated that two pressure peaks result from the shock wave interacting with the chamber wall, and radiation energy accumulates directly in front of the hydrodynamic shock wave. The shock wave should reach a maximum pressure peak when the chamber gas has a density between the two extremes analyzed. In general, calculated results with our model compared favorably with previously published data.
Date: July 2, 2003
Creator: Sizyuk, V. & Hassanein, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NNSA / IAEA VVER reactor safety workshops. May 2002 - April 2003. Executive summary.

Description: Over the past year, the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has sponsored four workshops to compare the probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) of Soviet-designed VVER power plants. The ''International Workshop on Safety of First-Generation VVER-440 Nuclear Power Plants'' was held on May 20-25, 2002, in Piestany, Slovakia. A short follow-on workshop was held in Bratislava, Slovakia, on November 5-6, 2002, to complete the work begun in May. Piestany was the location also for the ''International Workshop on Safety of Second-Generation VVER-440 Nuclear Power Plants'' (September 9-14, 2002) and the ''International Workshop on Safety of VVER-1000 Nuclear Power Plants'' (April 7-12, 2003). The four workshops were held in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Slovakia (UJD), the Center for Nuclear Safety in Central and Eastern Europe (CENS), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objectives of the workshops were to identify the impact of the improvements on the core damage frequency; the contribution to the PRA results of different assumptions about events that can occur at the plants; and to understand, identify, and prioritize potential improvements in hardware and plant operation of VVER nuclear power plants. These objectives were achieved based on insights gained from recent PRAs completed by the plants and their technical support organizations. Nine first-generation VVER-440 plants (nominally of the VVER-440/230 design) are currently operating in Armenia, Bulgaria, Russia, and Slovakia. Sixteen VVER-440/213 plants are currently operating in the Czech Republic, Hungary, Russia, Slovakia, and Ukraine. Twenty-three VVER-1000 plants are currently operating in Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Russia, and Ukraine. Eleven addition plants are in the advanced stages of construction in various parts of the world. The workshops reviewed the current configuration and safety status of each plant represented, which have all implemented numerous safety upgrades from the original VVER designs. The ...
Date: July 29, 2003
Creator: Evans, M. & Petri, M. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fuel-Cycle energy and emission impacts of ethanol-diesel blends in urban buses and farming tractors.

Description: About 2.1 billion gallons of fuel ethanol was used in the United States in 2002, mainly in the form of gasoline blends containing up to 10% ethanol (E10). Ethanol use has the potential to increase in the U.S. blended gasoline market because methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), formerly the most popular oxygenate blendstock, may be phased out owing to concerns about MTBE contamination of the water supply. Ethanol would remain the only viable near-term option as an oxygenate in reformulated gasoline production and to meet a potential federal renewable fuels standard (RFS) for transportation fuels. Ethanol may also be blended with additives (co-solvents) into diesel fuels for applications in which oxygenation may improve diesel engine emission performance. Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate the fuel-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission effects of ethanol-gasoline blends relative to those of gasoline for applications in spark-ignition engine vehicles (see Wang et al. 1997; Wang et al. 1999; Levelton Engineering et al. 1999; Shapouri et al. 2002; Graboski 2002). Those studies did not address the energy and emission effects of ethanol-diesel (E-diesel or ED) blends relative to those of petroleum diesel fuel in diesel engine vehicles. The energy and emission effects of E-diesel could be very different from those of ethanol-gasoline blends because (1) the energy use and emissions generated during diesel production (so-called ''upstream'' effects) are different from those generated during gasoline production; and (2) the energy and emission performance of E-diesel and petroleum diesel fuel in diesel compression-ignition engines differs from that of ethanol-gasoline blends in spark-ignition (Otto-cycle-type) engine vehicles. The Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs (DCCA) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory to conduct a full fuel-cycle analysis of the energy and emission effects of E-diesel blends relative to those of petroleum diesel when used in the types of ...
Date: September 11, 2003
Creator: Wang, M.; Saricks, C. & Lee, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CONDITIONING TECHNOLOGY FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE RESULTED FROM THE TREATMENT OF LIQUID WASTE FROM THE ROMANIAN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

Description: For the conditioning of spent resins contaminated with radionuclides, such as: 137Cs, 134Cs, 60Co, 58Co, 57Co, 54Mn, etc., techniques of direct immobilization in cement, bitumen and organic polymers have been tested. The selected process was the bituminization using industrial bitumen, I 60-70, made in Romania, which had very good characteristics. The paper presents stages of the research project, technical conditions for the process and advantages of the bituminization of spent resins.
Date: February 27, 2003
Creator: Arsene, Carmen; Andrei, Veronica & Negoiu, Dumitru
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Particle-bed gas-cooled fast reactor (PB-GCFR) design. Project final technical report (Sept 2001 - Aug 2003).

Description: The objective of this project is to develop a conceptual design of a particle-bed, gas-cooled fast reactor (PB-GCFR) core that meets the advanced reactor concept and enhanced proliferation-resistant goals of the US Department of Energy's NERI program. The key innovation of this project is the application of a fast neutron spectrum environment to enhance both the passive safety and transmutation characteristics of the advanced particle-bed and pebble-bed reactor designs. The PB-GCFR design is expected to produce a high-efficiency system with a low unit cost. It is anticipated that the fast neutron spectrum would permit small-sized units ({approx} 150 MWe) that can be built quickly and packaged into modular units, and whose production can be readily expanded as the demand grows. Such a system could be deployed globally. The goals of this two-year project are as follows: (1) design a reactor core that meets the future needs of the nuclear industry, by being passively safe with reduced need for engineered safety systems. This will entail an innovative core design incorporating new fuel form and type; (2) employ a proliferation-resistant fuel design and fuel cycle. This will be supported by a long-life core design that is refueled infrequently, and hence, reduces the potential for fuel diversion; (3) incorporate design features that permit use of the system as an efficient transmuter that could be employed for burning separated plutonium fuel or recycled LWR transuranic fuel, should the need arise; and (4) evaluate the fuel cycle for waste minimization and for the possibility of direct fuel disposal. The application of particle-bed fuel provides the promise of extremely high burnup and fission-product protection barriers that may permit direct disposal.
Date: October 27, 2003
Creator: Taiwo, T. A.; Wei, T. Y. C.; Feldman, E. E.; Hoffman, E. A.; Fatone, M.; Holland, J. W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Naval Reactors Facility Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003

Description: The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 2003 at the Naval Reactors Facility are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy.
Date: December 31, 2003
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOE-EPRI On-Line Monitoring Implementation Guidelines

Description: Industry and EPRI experience at several plants has shown on-line monitoring to be very effective in identifying out-of-calibration instrument channels or indications of equipment-degradation problems. The EPRI implementation project for on-line monitoring has demonstrated the feasability of on-line monitoring at several participating nuclear plants. The results have been very enouraging, and substantial progress is anticipated in the coming years.
Date: January 2, 2003
Creator: E. Davis, R. Bickford
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors - annual report, January-December 2001.

Description: This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from January to December 2001. Topics that have been investigated include (a) environmental effects on fatigue S-N behavior of austenitic stainless steels (SSs), (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic SSs, and (c) EAC of Alloy 600. The effects of key material and loading variables, such as strain amplitude, strain rate, temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO) level in water, and material heat treatment, on the fatigue lives of wrought and cast austenitic SSs in air and LWR environments have been evaluated. The mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic SSs in LWR environments has also been examined. The results indicate that the presence of a surface oxide film or difference in the characteristics of the oxide film has no effect on fatigue crack initiation in austenitic SSs in LWR environments. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests and post-test fractographic analyses were conducted on several model SS alloys irradiated to {approx}2 x 10{sup 21} n {center_dot} cm{sup -2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx}3 dpa) in He at 289 C in the Halden reactor. The results were used to determine the influence of alloying and impurity elements on the susceptibility of these steels to IASCC. Corrosion fatigue tests were conducted on nonirradiated austenitic SSs in high-purity water at 289 C to establish the test procedure and conditions that will be used for the tests on irradiated materials. A comprehensive irradiation experiment was initiated to obtain many tensile and disk specimens irradiated under simulated pressurized water reactor conditions at {approx}325 C to 5, 10, 20, and 40 dpa. Crack growth tests were completed on 30% cold-worked Alloy 600 in high-purity water under various environmental and loading conditions. The results are compared with data obtained earlier ...
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Clark, R. W.; Gruber, E. E; Hiller, R. W.; Shack, W. J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Review of the margins for ASME code fatigue design curve - effects of surface roughness and material variability.

Description: The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. The Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of the existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data for carbon and low-alloy steels and wrought and cast austenitic SSs to define the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters on the fatigue lives of the steels. Experimental data are presented on the effects of surface roughness on the fatigue life of these steels in air and LWR environments. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are discussed. Data available in the literature have been reviewed to evaluate the conservatism in the existing ASME Code fatigue evaluations. A critical review of the margins for ASME Code fatigue design curves is presented.
Date: October 3, 2003
Creator: Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J. & Technology, Energy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Deployment Options for A Spent Fuel Treatment Facility in the United States

Description: A promising alternative to direct disposal is to process the commercial spent nuclear fuel into key partitions permitting recovery of some of the energy value while providing vital flexibility to the operation of a repository in a manner to minimize and possibly defer the near-term need for future repositories. It is assumed that such a Spent Fuel Treatment Facility (SFTF) will provide significant benefit to the US nuclear waste program and this paper focuses on key options for deployment of such a facility. The SFTF would partition the spent fuel into manageable components that could be recovered, recycled, or dispositioned as economically beneficial to the overall fuel cycle and/or enhances the repository performance. The goal of the SFTF is to reduce the high level waste volume going to a repository, provide for more effective heat management, enhance the containment performance of the specific waste forms, and provide for energy recovery or transmutation as practical.
Date: November 20, 2003
Creator: McGuire, DH.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final MTI Data Report: Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station

Description: During the periods from May 2000 to September 2001 and March 5 to April 10, 2002, cooling-lake surface water temperature data was collected at the Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Station near Granbury, Texas. This effort was led by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) with the assistance of plant personnel. Permission for setting up these monitoring sites was granted by TXU Energy, which owns the plant site and surrounding property including Squaw Creek reservoir where the measurements were taken. This work was done in support of SRTC's ground truth mission for the U.S. Department of Energy's Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) satellite.
Date: March 17, 2003
Creator: Parker, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final MTI Data Report: Pilgrim Nuclear Station

Description: During the period from May 2000 to September 2001, ocean surface water temperature data was collected at the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station near Plymouth, MA. This effort was led by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) with the assistance of a local sub-contractor, Marine BioControl Corporation of Sandwich, MA. Permission for setting up the monitoring system was granted by Energy Corporation, which owns the plant site. This work was done in support of SRTC's ground truth mission for the U.S. Department of Energy's Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) satellite.
Date: March 17, 2003
Creator: Parker, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final MTI Data Report: Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant

Description: During the period from September 2000 to April 2002, surface water temperature data was collected at the Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant near Homestead, FL. This effort was led by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) with the assistance of local plant personnel. Permission for setting up the monitoring sites was granted by Florida Power and Light, which owns the plant site. This work was done in support of SRTC's ground truth mission for the U.S. Department of Energy's Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI).
Date: March 17, 2003
Creator: Parker, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ion Chamber Compensation Tests

Description: The purpose of this report is to present the results of a series of tests performed to determine the need for gamma compensation of the ion chambers used to monitor the neutron flux in the 100 Area reactors.
Date: February 14, 2003
Creator: Mallard, R.L. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stabilization of Metal-Loaded Ion-Exchange Resin with a Porous Silica Supporter Through Thermal Treatment

Description: A new ion exchanger with porous silica as a supporting material and diphosphonic acid as a functional chelating group has been developed at ANL for the effective removal of transition metals and actinide ions from very acidic radioactive liquid wastes. The applicability of this resin for the treatment of low- and/or intermediate-level aqueous waste from nuclear power plants (NPP) has not been reported in scientific literature, but is under study now in Korea. The major radioisotopes in NPP radioactive liquid waste are Cs and Co in neutral pH ranges. This study on the thermal stabilization of metal-loaded waste resin has been carried out in parallel with the sorption experiment. Thermal treatment of metal (Co, Cs or U) loaded resin was accomplished to see the possibility of enhancing the safety and stability of the final product during transportation and disposal. In this paper, characteristics of the metal-loaded resins before and after heat treatment at three different thermal conditions were investigated and compared with each other to see the effectiveness of the thermal treatment method.
Date: February 25, 2003
Creator: Kim, I-T. Park, H-S.; Yoo, J-H. & Kim, J-H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Status of the NRC Decommissioning Program

Description: On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule or LTR) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program that was presented during WM'02. It discusses the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process, current issues being faced in the decommissioning program, such as partial site release and restricted release of sites, as well as the status of the decommissioning of complex sites and those listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors and the transfer of complex decommissioning sites and sites listed on the SDMP to Agreement States. Finally the paper provides an update of the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including an effort to consolidate and risk-inform decommissioning guidance.
Date: February 24, 2003
Creator: Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L.; Buckley, J.; Pogue, E. & Banovac, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department