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Market Assessment and Technical Feasibility Study of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Ash Use

Description: Western Research Institute in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute, Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy Technology Center (METC), has undertaken a research and demonstration program designed to examine the market potential and the technical feasibility of ash use options for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) ashes. The assessment is designed to address six applications, including: (1) structural fill, (2) road base construction, (3) supplementary cementing materials in portland cement, (4) synthetic aggregate, and (5) agricultural/soil amendment applications. Ash from low-sulfur subbituminous coal-fired Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, and ash from the high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired American Electric Power (AEP) bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing. This paper addresses the technical feasibility of ash use options for PFBC unit using low- sulfur coal and limestone sorbent (karhula ash) and high-sulfur coal and dolomite sorbents (AEP Tidd ash).
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Bland, A.E. & Brown, T.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags. Quarterly report, March 1--May 31, 1996

Description: Integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) technology is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of lightweight aggregates (LWA) and ultra-lightweight (ULWA) from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase 1, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot-scale, and Phase 2, which involves commercial evaluation of these aggregates in a number of applications. The following significant events occurred during this reporting period: testing of slag-based lightweight aggregates for roof tile and concrete applications.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversion of coal wastes into waste-cleaning materials. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

Description: In the last few months we have been working on the conversion of various fly ashes into zeolites. It was reported in the last report that by fusing fly ash with sodium hydroxide, all fly ashes that were studied can be converted into zeolites. Apparently, the fusion between the fly ash and sodium hydroxide produced sodium silicates which dissolve more readily than fly ash itself. The higher concentration of silicates within the solutions enhances the formation of zeolites. In this report, we summarize the results on the ion-exchange behavior of those treated fly ash with Cs{sup +}, Co{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} ions as well as the characterization of the concentration of Si, Al, and Na in the curing solutions.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Shih, Wei-Heng
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use of depleted uranium metal as cask shielding in high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal systems

Description: The US DOE has amassed over 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium from its uranium enrichment operations. Rather than dispose of this depleted uranium as waste, this study explores a beneficial use of depleted uranium as metal shielding in casks designed to contain canisters of vitrified high-level waste. Two high-level waste storage, transport, and disposal shielded cask systems are analyzed. The first system employs a shielded storage and disposal cask having a separate reusable transportation overpack. The second system employs a shielded combined storage, transport, and disposal cask. Conceptual cask designs that hold 1, 3, 4 and 7 high-level waste canisters are described for both systems. In all cases, cask design feasibility was established and analyses indicate that these casks meet applicable thermal, structural, shielding, and contact-handled requirements. Depleted uranium metal casting, fabrication, environmental, and radiation compatibility considerations are discussed and found to pose no serious implementation problems. About one-fourth of the depleted uranium inventory would be used to produce the casks required to store and dispose of the nearly 15,400 high-level waste canisters that would be produced. This study estimates the total-system cost for the preferred 7-canister storage and disposal configuration having a separate transportation overpack would be $6.3 billion. When credits are taken for depleted uranium disposal cost, a cost that would be avoided if depleted uranium were used as cask shielding material rather than disposed of as waste, total system net costs are between $3.8 billion and $5.5 billion.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Yoshimura, H.R.; Ludwigsen, J.S. & McAllaster, M.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Disposal of fluidized-bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence. Quarterly report, March 1--May 31, 1996

Description: During Phase 1 (first 18 months) the project is segregated into four areas of reporting: (A) Grout Formulation, (B) Grout Characterization, (C) Water Quality Monitoring, (D) Subsidence Control and Contaminant Transport. The first component involves formulating a grout mixture with appropriate flowability to be used in filling complex mine voids. The Grout Characterization component will determine the flow characteristics of the formulated grout. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase 3 (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the strength requirements and the migration of contaminants through the candidate grouts. This report separately discusses progress on all components of the program in order of project subtask.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Structural insulated panels produced from recycled Expanded-Polystrene (EPS) foam scrap. Final report

Description: This report documents a research project undertaken to assess the feasibility of using scrap reground expanded polystyrene (EPS) in the manufacture of structural insulated panels (SIPs) in order to save material costs and reduce the amount of EPS waste products to be disposed. The project team, managed by Steven Winter Associates, Inc., a Norwalk, Connecticut-based building systems research and consulting firm included: Thermal Foams, Inc., a Buffalo-based manufacturer of EPS products; BASF Corp., the world`s largest producer of EPS beads; Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which performed thermal tests (ASTM C-518); RADCO, Inc. which performed material properties tests: density (ASTM C-303), flexural strength (ASTM C-203), tensile strength (ASTM D-1623), and transverse load test of SIPs panels (ASTM E-72). The report documents the manufacturing and testing process and concludes that there was relatively little difference in the thermal and structural characteristics under normal loading conditions of the panels tested with varying amount of regrind (from 10% - 25%) and those made with 100% virgin beads. The report recommends that additional tests be undertaken, but suggests that, based on the test results, reground EPS can be successfully used in the cores of SIPs in amounts up to 25%.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Grinnell, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, June 1, 1996--August 30, 1996

Description: To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of. This sludge is a result of reacting limestone with sulfur dioxide to precipitate calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. It consists of calcium sulfite, gypsum, and unreacted limestone or lime, with miscellaneous objectionable impurities such as iron oxides, silicates, and magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxides or salts. These impurities prevent many sludges from being utilized as a replacement for natural gypsum, and as a result they must be disposed of in landfills, which presents a serious disposal problem. Knowledge of scrubber sludge characteristics is necessary for the development of purification technologies which will make it possible to directly utilize scrubber sludges rather then landfilling them. This project is studying the use of minimal-reagent froth flotation as the purification process, using the surface properties of the particles of unreacted limestone to remove them and their associated impurities from the material, leaving a purified calcium sulfite/gypsum product. In this quarter, the installation of a laboratory-scale flotation column was completed. In addition to the installation of the flotation column, research on the determination of the surface properties of the components of the scrubber sludge was continued. Auger electron spectroscopy was investigated as a method for determining the composition of the first few monolayers of unreacted limestone and calcium sulfite/sulfate particles.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Kawatra, S.K. & Eisele, T.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use of fluidized-bed combustion ash in agricultural applications. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1996

Description: The field experimental site was located on a well drained Beltsville silt loam soil. Field soil samples were analyzed for trace elements prior to treatment initiation from each of the 12 plot areas. Blackberry plants were planted in June 1995. In August 1995, foliar samples from the field planted blackberry plants were obtained prior to soil treatment applications, Average leaf fresh and dry weights were recorded as well as elemental analysis data. At the end of August, 1995, four plots were treated with fluidized bed combustion (FBC) materials, another four with (FBC) materials plus manure, and the remaining four were used as controls. Post-treatment foliar samples were obtained, weighed and analyzed. Blackberry fruit samples were also obtained, freeze-dried and analyzed. Twenty-four soil columns were constructed from 6 inches (ID) PVC pipes and filled with replicates of the field experiment, control (soil alone), FBC material, manure, and FBC material plus manure. The equivalent of 1 inch of rainfall (200 ml distilled water) was applied weekly for 16 weeks. The day after rainfall additions leachates were collected, filtered and analyzed for pH and electrical conductivity. The remaining sample volumes were frozen until the completion of the study and then analyzed for elemental content. These results are presented. Analysis of the FBC material and dairy manure used in all experiments are presented in Table 1. For comparative purposes, analysis of agricultural limestone is also presented.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Korcak, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996

Description: On September 30, 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Souther Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled ``Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines``. Under the agreement SIUC will develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement, using virtually dry materials, and (2) hydraulic placement, using a ``paste`` mixture of materials with about 70% solids. Phase II of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase II is to develop and fabricate the equipment for both the pneumatic and hydraulic placement technologies, and to conduct a surface demonstration-test of both technologies. During the current quarter the main thrust was to develop the equipment necessary for the program. Shop drawings were completed for the pneumatic placement equipment, and purchase orders issued for many of the component parts. The final pneumatic placement system will be assembled in the SIUC Carterville facility.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report

Description: The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.
Date: April 30, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Systems and economic analysis of microalgae ponds for conversion of CO{sub 2} to biomass. Final report

Description: There is growing evidence that global warming could become a major global environmental threat during the 21st century. The precautionary principle commands preventive action, at both national and international levels, to minimize this potential threat. Many near-term, relatively inexpensive, mitigation options are available. In addition, long-term research is required to evaluate and develop advanced, possibly more expensive, countermeasures, in the eventuality that they may be required. The utilization of power plant CO{sub 2} and its recycling into fossil fuel substitutes by microalgae cultures could be one such long-term technology. Microalgae production is an expanding industry in the U.S., with three commercial systems (of approximately 10 hectare each) producing nutriceuticals, specifically beta-carotene, extracted from Dunaliella, and Spirulina biomass. Microalgae are also used in wastewater treatment. Currently production costs are high, about $10,000/ton of algal biomass, almost two orders of magnitude higher than acceptable for greenhouse gas mitigation. This report reviews the current state-of-the-art, including algal cultivation and harvesting-processing, and outlines a technique for achieving very high productivities. Costs of CO{sub 2} mitigation with microalgae production of oils ({open_quotes}biodiesel{close_quotes}) are estimated and future R&D needs outlined.
Date: March 21, 1996
Creator: Benemann, J.R. & Oswald, W.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber. Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Technical progress report, September 1, 1994--August 31, 1995

Description: About 285 million tires are discarded every year; less than 100 million are currently being recycled, with the rest being placed in landfills and other waste sites. A solution to reduce the littering of the environment is to use ground tire rubber in road construction. Currently, about 27 million tons of asphalt are used each year in road construction and maintenance of the country`s 2 million miles of roads. If all of the waste tire rubber could be combined with asphalt in road construction, it would displace less than 6% of the total asphalt used each year, yet could save about 60 trillion Btus annually. Purpose of this project is to provide data needed to optimize the performance of rubber-asphalt concretes. The first phase is to develop asphalts and recycling agents tailored for compatibility with ground tire rubber. Chapter 2 presents results on Laboratory Testing and Evaluation: fractionate asphalt material, reblending for aromatic asphalts, verifying optimal curing parameters, aging of blends, and measuring ductilities of asphalt-rubber binders. Chapter 3 focuses on Evaluating Mixture Characteristics (modified binders). Chapter 4 covers Adhesion Test Development (water susceptibility is also covered). The final chapter focuses on the Performance/Economic Update and Commercialization Plan.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R. & Glover, C.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mississippi DOE EPSCoR planning grant. Final report

Description: The Mississippi DOE EPSCoR planning grant committee identified three focus areas for a proposal submitted on January 25, 1995, to the US DOE: Human Resource Development, Environmental Synergisms from Fuel Mixtures of Tire Particles and Low Rank Coals, and Energy Efficient Heat Transfer Equipment and Materials. In the human resources are, efforts were undertaken to identify and develop linkages with educational institutions, national laboratories, and industries and to identify strategies for attracting and involving students in areas leading to technical careers. The fuel mixtures project was directed toward developing ways to combine scrap tire particles and lignite coal into a blended fuel that could be used in electric power generation. In the energy efficient heat transfer area, analytical and experimental investigations were planned to increase the efficiency of heat exchangers and insulating materials.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Steele, W.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 3. Engineering development. Annual report, April 1, 1995--May 15, 1996

Description: Refineries discharge large volumes of H2, CO, and CO 2 from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This R&D program seeks to develop, demonstrate, and commercialize a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol for blending with gasoline. A 200,000 BPD refinery could produce up to 38 million gallons ethanol per year. The program is being conducted in 3 phases: II, technology development; III, engineering development; and IV, demonstration. Phase I, exploratory development, has been completed. The research effort has yielded two strains (Isolates O-52 and C-01) which are to be used in the pilot studies to produce ethanol from CO, CO2, and H2 in petroleum waste gas. Results from single continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) laboratory tests have shown that 20-25 g/L ethanol can be produced with < 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Laboratory studies with two CSTRs in series have yielded ethanol concentrations of 30-35 g/L with 2-4 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Water recycle from distillation back to the fermenter shows that filtration of the water before distillation eliminates the recycle of toxic materials back to the fermenter. Product recovery in the process will use direct distillation to the azeotrope, followed by adsorption to produce neat ethanol. This is less energy intensive than e.g. solvent extraction, azeotropic distillation, or pervaporation. Economic projections are quite attractive; the economics are refinery stream dependent and thus vary depending on refinery location and operation.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C & Gaddy, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utilization of low NOx coal combustion by-products. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1996

Description: The objective of this project was to commercialize fly ash beneficiation at various facilities around the country. The paper describes laboratory characterization of fly ash samples, pilot plant testing, product testing, and market and economic analyses. Products include concrete, concrete blocks and bricks, plastic fillers, activated carbon, and metal matrix composites.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversion of coal wastes into waste-cleaning materials. Quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996

Description: It is shown that fly ash can be used to participate in the formation of mesoporous materials. The dissolution of silicate species changes the surfactant/Si molar ratio in the silicate-surfactant solutions precipitating the MCM-41 phase. The current results demonstrate that fly ash can be used to form mesoporous materials and the impurities in the fly ash is not detrimental to the formation of MCM-41 phase. Although the MCM-41 phase can be formed with fly ash in the silicate-surfactant solutions, no MCM-41 phase can be made with solutions of surfactant/Si=0.35. The study so far indicates that fly ash has the potential to be used to form mesoporous materials. However, in order to make further progress, the concentration of silicate and aluminate species in the solutions needs to be controlled. In other words, the chemistry of the fly ash solutions needs to be studied in more detail. In the next few months, the authors plan to study the effects of using different fly ash solutions for the formation of zeolites as the first step in controlling the chemistry of fly ash solutions. Once the chemical composition of the fly ash can be controlled, it may be possible to increase the amount of participation of fly ash to the formation of mesoporous materials.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Shih, W.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products. Quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1996--May 31, 1996

Description: To reduce their sulfur emissions, many coal-fired electric power plants use wet flue-gas scrubbers. These scrubbers convert sulfur oxides into solid sulfate and sulfite sludge, which must then be disposed of. This sludge is a result of reacting limestone with sulfur dioxide to precipitate calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate. It consists of calcium sulfite, gypsum, and unreacted limestone or lime, with miscellaneous objectionable impurities such as iron oxides, silicates, and magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxides or salts. These impurities prevent many sludges from being utilized as a replacement for natural gypsum, and as a result they must be disposed of in landfills, which presents a serious disposal problem.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Kawatra, S.K. & Eisele, T.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Task 6.4 - the use of coal ash in ceramics. Topical report, July--December 1995

Description: Previous empirical tests at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) have indicated that coal combustion by-products are a viable starting material for the production of a variety of ceramic products, including brick, tile, and high-flexural-strength ceramics. The EERC has focused on high-temperature properties of coal ashes and has provided valuable insight into ash transformations, fouling, and stagging for the utility industry. It is proposed to utilize the information generated in these past projects to develop material selection criteria and product manufacturing techniques based on scientific and engineering characteristics of the ash. Commercialization of the use of coal combustion by-products in ceramics is more likely to become viable if a quality-assured product can be made, and predictive materials selection is a key component of a quality-assured product. The objective of this work was to demonstrate the development and production of a ceramic material utilizing coal ash as a key component. Chemical and high-temperature properties of ash were carefully determined with the objective of identifying criteria for materials selection and manufacturing options for ceramic production.
Date: March 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DU-AGG pilot plant design study

Description: The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is developing new methods to produce high-density aggregate (artificial rock) primarily consisting of depleted uranium oxide. The objective is to develop a low-cost method whereby uranium oxide powder (UO[sub 2], U[sub 3]O[sub ]8, or UO[sub 3]) can be processed to produce high-density aggregate pieces (DU-AGG) having physical properties suitable for disposal in low-level radioactive disposal facilities or for use as a component of high-density concrete used as shielding for radioactive materials. A commercial company, G-M Systems, conducted a design study for a manufacturing pilot plant to process DU-AGG. The results of that study are included and summarized in this report. Also explained are design considerations, equipment capacities, the equipment list, system operation, layout of equipment in the plant, cost estimates, and the proposed plan and schedule.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Lessing, P.A. & Gillman, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, June 30--September 30, 1996

Description: During the fourth quarter of Phase 2, work continued on evaluating treatment of the seventh residue of Phase 1, conducting scholarly work, preparing for field work, preparing and delivering presentations, and making additional outside contacts. The work consisted of further testing of the solidification of the seventh hazardous waste--the sandblast residue from paint removal in a building--and examining the microstructure of the products of solidification. There were two treated waste mixtures which demonstrated immediate stabilization, the sandblast residue w/30% spray drier residue (CONSOL) and the sandblast residue w/50% PFBC residue (Tidd).
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Cobb, J. T.; Neufeld, R. D. & Blachere, J. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Decomposition of PCBs in Oils Using Gamma Radiolysis A Treatability Study - Final Report

Description: Several legacy hydraulic oil waste streams contaminated with Aroclor 1260 and small amounts of Cesium-137 have been in storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) due to the lack of appropriate treatment facilities. The goal of this study was to demonstrate that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) could be selectively decomposed in the oils. Removal of the PCB component to less than the 2 mg/L treatment standard should result in a waste oil that is not regulated by the Toxic Substances Control Act. Irradiation of the oils with high gamma-ray doses produces free electrons in the solution that react with PCBs. The reaction results in dechlorination of the PCBs to produce biphenyl. The gamma-ray source was spent reactor fuel stored in the Advanced Test Reactor canal at the INEL. A dry tube extends into the canal which allowed for positioning of samples in the proximity of the fuel. The gamma-ray dose rates at the samples varied from 10 to 30 kGy/h. This was measured using commercially available FWT-60 dosimeters. Irradiation of samples in a series of progressively increasing absorbed doses allowed the generation of rate constants used to predict absorbed doses necessary to meet the 2 mg/kg treatment standard. Three separate irradiation experiments were performed. The first irradiation used a maximum absorbed dose of 183 kGy. This experiment demonstrated that the PCB concentration decreased and allowed calculation of preliminary rate constants. The second irradiation used a maximum absorbed dose of 760 kGy. From this experiment, accurate rate constants were calculated, and the necessary absorbed dose to achieve the treatment standard was calculated. In the third irradiation of 2,242 kGy, all three waste streams were adequately decontaminated.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Mincher, B. J. & Arbon, R. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A silica/fly ash-based technology for controlling pyrite oxidation. Semi-annual technical progress report, September 1, 1995--February 29, 1996

Description: The overall objective is to develop methodologies by which sodium metasilicate or fly ash may produce an effective coating on pyrite surfaces for inhibiting pyrite oxidation. Accomplishments are described for the following tasks: Pyrite surface reactivity; Micro column leaching experiments; and Large column leaching experiments.
Date: March 28, 1996
Creator: Evangelou, V.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 2 report

Description: A study was initiated in December 1990 to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products. A Phase 1 report provided results of an extensive characterization of chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of 58 dry FGD by-product samples. The Phase 1 report concluded that high volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics related to their ability to substitute for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mine lands). Phase 2 objectives were (1) to conduct laboratory and greenhouse studies of FGD and soil (spoil) mixtures for agronomic and engineering applications, (2) to initiate field studies related to high volume agronomic and engineering uses, and (3) to develop the basic methodological framework for estimation of the financial and economic costs and benefits to society of several FGD reuse options and to make some preliminary runs of economic models. High volume beneficial reuses of dry FGD by-products have been successfully demonstrated. Adverse environmental impacts have been negligible. Although few sources of dry FGD by-products currently exist in Ohio and the United States there is potential for smaller coal-fired facilities to adopt S0{sub 2} scrubbing technologies that produce dry FGD material. Also much of what we have learned from studies on dry FGD by-products is applicable to the more prevalent wet FGD by-products. The adaptation of the technologies demonstrated in this project seem to be not only limited by economic constraints, but even more so, by the need to create awareness of the market potential of using these FGD by-products.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Stehouwer, R.; Dick, W. & Bigham, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utilization of low NO{sub x} coal combustion by-products. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

Description: Accomplishments to date are described for the following tasks. Task 2, Laboratory characterization, involved sample collection, material characterization, and laboratory testing of ash processing operations. The paper describes settling tests, leaf filter tests, centrifuge tests, and hydrocyclone tests. No pilot plant tests (Task 3) were performed this quarter. Task 4, Product testing, involves concrete testing (effect of power plant ashes on concrete properties), concrete block/brick, plastic fillers, activated carbon, and metal matrix composites. Task 5, Market and economic analysis, is also discussed.
Date: January 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department